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United States Military Bases Japan

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NEWS
April 1, 1992 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirteen sailors have been court-martialed or discharged for alleged homosexual activity at the U.S. Navy base in Yokosuka, Japan, and a continuing investigation may result in charges against several others, including some officers, Navy officials said Tuesday. Civilian and Navy sources familiar with the inquiry said as many as 40 more Navy enlisted men and officers are being investigated, including two commanders and three lieutenants. Officials from the San Diego Veterans Assn.
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NEWS
February 7, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The top U.S. Marine in Japan won't be punished for calling Okinawan officials "nuts and a bunch of wimps" in an e-mail message to his staff, the Pentagon said Tuesday. Marine Lt. Gen. Earl Hailston's comments became the latest irritant in the touchy U.S.-Okinawan relationship when they appeared Tuesday in Ryukyu Shimpo, the biggest newspaper published on the Japanese island, which is home to 26,000 U.S. troops.
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NEWS
March 19, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
This tiny hamlet of sugar cane farmers, nestled quietly in a thick forest in the north of Okinawa, is waging a symbolic battle that may signal a new era in the military alliance binding the United States and Japan. The U.S. Marine Corps wants to build a landing pad about a mile away to train Marines in the tactical use of Harrier jets, a combat aircraft that can take off and land vertically.
NEWS
July 23, 2000 | From Associated Press
President Clinton told U.S. troops Saturday that they "need to be good neighbors" to the people of Okinawa, who are weary of the massive American military presence on this Japanese island and angry about instances of unruly conduct and crime. "Each of us has a personal obligation to do everything that we can to strengthen our friendship and to do nothing to harm it," Clinton instructed thousands of Marines, soldiers, sailors and airmen who waited past 11 p.m.
NEWS
September 5, 1996 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese government is using Okinawa to protect the peace and prosperity of mainland Japan while ignoring the hardships that Okinawans have suffered from 50 years of a heavy U.S. military presence, the province's embattled leader charged Wednesday. "I am afraid they don't care," Gov. Masahide Ota of Okinawa said bitterly. In an hourlong, exclusive interview conducted on the anniversary of the rape of a 12-year-old Okinawan schoolgirl involving three U.S.
NEWS
September 8, 1996 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For centuries, most Japanese homes have had a sacred alcove to display the household's prize possessions: an ancient scroll, a seasonal flower arrangement, the family's samurai sword. But in the southern archipelago of Okinawa, which was an independent kingdom until Japan annexed it in 1879, the mainland's military traditions never took hold. Here, the object lovingly displayed in many alcoves, or tokonomas, is a musical instrument, the three-stringed sansen.
NEWS
February 7, 1998 | From Associated Press
Okinawa's governor said Friday that he opposes building an offshore heliport for American armed forces, the centerpiece of a plan to reduce the heavy U.S. military presence on the southern Japanese island. Gov. Masahide Ota said local residents are unhappy with the Japanese government's plan to build the floating platform off the island's eastern coast.
NEWS
July 4, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Two pieces of metal were fired from small steel pipes toward a U.S. military base on the outskirts of Tokyo in what Japanese police suspect was attempted sabotage by leftist radicals. There were no reports of injuries or damage inside or outside Yokota Air Base, although one projectile landed near a runway. Police were still searching to find out where the other landed.
NEWS
January 5, 2000 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
Enough with this talk of millennia. Let's go back to taking things one year at a time. That's especially wise for Asia and for the American role there. A year is time enough for six separatist rebellions in Indonesia, five North Korean extortions, four Japanese governments, three Hong Kong court rulings pledging subservience to China, two Chinese political crackdowns and one (short-lived) Chinese opening--not to mention half a dozen switches in Asia policy by the Clinton administration.
NEWS
April 20, 1996 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
China on Friday rebuffed the Clinton administration's new initiative for talks on the future of the Korean peninsula by suggesting that the governments in Seoul and Pyongyang will have to work out their own differences before outside powers become involved. Chinese Foreign Minister Qian Qichen also reacted coolly to the upgrading of security ties between the United States and Japan, warning that Washington and Tokyo should not extend their defense cooperation throughout Asia.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
Tens of thousands of protesters formed a chain around a major U.S. air base Thursday in a show of opposition to the American military presence here ahead of President Clinton's visit for the Group of 8 summit. Organizers claimed to have mobilized more than 25,000 people for the chain, which stretched 11 miles around Kadena Air Base, one of the largest U.S. military installations here.
NEWS
July 4, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Two pieces of metal were fired from small steel pipes toward a U.S. military base on the outskirts of Tokyo in what Japanese police suspect was attempted sabotage by leftist radicals. There were no reports of injuries or damage inside or outside Yokota Air Base, although one projectile landed near a runway. Police were still searching to find out where the other landed.
NEWS
July 4, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just when things were appearing relatively calm at the controversial U.S. military bases on Okinawa, a Marine was arrested Monday for allegedly molesting a 14-year-old girl. The case threatens to exacerbate tensions over the thousands of American troops on the island. The situation peaked in 1995 after three U.S. servicemen were convicted in the rape of a 12-year-old girl.
NEWS
May 19, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Save the dugongs, cry Japanese environmentalists. They warn that plans to relocate a U.S. military air base in Okinawa could wipe out Japan's last remaining population of the timid, endangered marine mammal that's a relative of the Florida manatee. As part of an effort to reduce the annoyance to Okinawans of hosting about 27,000 U.S. troops, the United States in 1996 agreed to return the Futenma air base to Japan as soon as an alternative site is provided.
NEWS
March 16, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Japan have reached a deal to clean up an incinerator that the U.S. Navy says has spewed toxic chemicals over an American base in Japan and which has been an irritant in the two countries' relationship for years, a senior U.S. official said Wednesday. The two countries planned to announce a deal today--a day after Defense Secretary William S.
NEWS
January 5, 2000 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
Enough with this talk of millennia. Let's go back to taking things one year at a time. That's especially wise for Asia and for the American role there. A year is time enough for six separatist rebellions in Indonesia, five North Korean extortions, four Japanese governments, three Hong Kong court rulings pledging subservience to China, two Chinese political crackdowns and one (short-lived) Chinese opening--not to mention half a dozen switches in Asia policy by the Clinton administration.
NEWS
December 2, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan and the United States agreed today to marshal their combined technological powers to build the world's first floating heliport in a proposal that represents one of the largest reversions of land by U.S. military forces on the southern island of Okinawa. One year after three U.S.
NEWS
September 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
Okinawans voted more than 10 to 1 Sunday in favor of a reduction of U.S. military bases on their islands, in a referendum aimed at pressuring Washington to pull out its troops. With virtually all of the ballots counted, about 90% of voters said that there were too many U.S. troops on their southern islands and that an agreement giving the troops special legal status should be changed. About 8% voted against the referendum.
NEWS
December 12, 1999 | From Associated Press
Despite its aversion to nuclear weapons, Japan allowed more American nuclear weapons on its territory during the 1950s and '60s than officials of either country have publicly acknowledged, according to declassified U.S. government documents. Nuclear weapons for U.S.
NEWS
April 12, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voters in Japan's capital said yes Sunday to hawkish politician and well-known author Shintaro Ishihara, who promised to create a "Tokyo That Can Say No" if elected prefectural governor. The charismatic Ishihara, 66, best known for his largely anti-U.S. policy book, "The Japan That Can Say No," already has begun to create headaches for U.S. and Japanese officials over his vow to recover the Yokota U.S. Air Force base located on Tokyo's outskirts.
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