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United States Military Bases Nevada

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NEWS
April 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Photos of Area 51, the super-secret Air Force test site in Nevada that tantalizes UFO and conspiracy buffs, are being posted on the Internet. Aerial Images Inc. of Raleigh, N.C., plans to post five images in collaboration with Microsoft, Kodak, Digital Equipment Corp., Autometric Inc. and the Russian agency Sovinformsputnik. The partners launched a Russian satellite in 1998 to map Earth's surface and Area 51.
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NEWS
April 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Photos of Area 51, the super-secret Air Force test site in Nevada that tantalizes UFO and conspiracy buffs, are being posted on the Internet. Aerial Images Inc. of Raleigh, N.C., plans to post five images in collaboration with Microsoft, Kodak, Digital Equipment Corp., Autometric Inc. and the Russian agency Sovinformsputnik. The partners launched a Russian satellite in 1998 to map Earth's surface and Area 51.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1998 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you're hunting for signs of travelers lost in uncharted space, what better place to look than the land of flying saucers? That's where anthropologist Jerry Freeman of Pearblossom found himself when he set off to follow the trail of the Lost '49ers--the wagon train that ended up in the desert instead of the gold fields when it made a wrong turn about 150 years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1998 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you're hunting for signs of travelers lost in uncharted space, what better place to look than the land of flying saucers? That's where anthropologist Jerry Freeman of Pearblossom found himself when he set off to follow the trail of the Lost '49ers--the wagon train that ended up in the desert instead of the gold fields when it made a wrong turn about 150 years ago.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | Associated Press
Southern Nevada will become home to a new military base on more than 4,500 acres of desert land overlooking the Nellis Air Force Base, according to Bureau of Land Management officials. The yet-unfinished plans call for two armored battalions, an armored brigade headquarters, an attack helicopter squadron and support facilities designed to accommodate 1,300 to 1,500 soldiers.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They have destroyed Scud missile launchers, won dogfights against enemy MIG-23s, and dodged repeated assaults from anti-aircraft artillery--so far without ever leaving the United States. But the knowledge that they could be called at any moment to exchange their practice missions for combat runs has turned this long-scheduled Air Force pilot training session in the rugged Nevada desert into a life-or-death course in the real thing.
NEWS
March 20, 1991 | SHANNON SANDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While gamblers in warm, dry Las Vegas casinos plunk coins intoslot machines, two men stand vigil in the icy rain about 120 miles to the north, scanning the sky. Jackpot. "Look at that!" yells Sean David Morton, pointing to a tiny, distant light. "It's bobbing up and down, making figure eights and weaving motions. It's zipping through the sky at an amazing speed." Sean David Morton has spotted an extraterrestrial craft. Yup, a flying saucer, he says.
NEWS
October 3, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Before Navy aircraft carriers put to sea, the pilots fly to central Nevada to hone their attack skills by steering low over desert mountains and sagebrush valleys--and sometimes over ranches and Indian ceremonial grounds. Being startled by sonic booms and pasture-skimming fighters has long been an accepted price of life in Nevada, where military jets fly over 70% of the state.
NEWS
March 20, 1991 | SHANNON SANDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While gamblers in warm, dry Las Vegas casinos plunk coins intoslot machines, two men stand vigil in the icy rain about 120 miles to the north, scanning the sky. Jackpot. "Look at that!" yells Sean David Morton, pointing to a tiny, distant light. "It's bobbing up and down, making figure eights and weaving motions. It's zipping through the sky at an amazing speed." Sean David Morton has spotted an extraterrestrial craft. Yup, a flying saucer, he says.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They have destroyed Scud missile launchers, won dogfights against enemy MIG-23s, and dodged repeated assaults from anti-aircraft artillery--so far without ever leaving the United States. But the knowledge that they could be called at any moment to exchange their practice missions for combat runs has turned this long-scheduled Air Force pilot training session in the rugged Nevada desert into a life-or-death course in the real thing.
NEWS
October 3, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Before Navy aircraft carriers put to sea, the pilots fly to central Nevada to hone their attack skills by steering low over desert mountains and sagebrush valleys--and sometimes over ranches and Indian ceremonial grounds. Being startled by sonic booms and pasture-skimming fighters has long been an accepted price of life in Nevada, where military jets fly over 70% of the state.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | Associated Press
Southern Nevada will become home to a new military base on more than 4,500 acres of desert land overlooking the Nellis Air Force Base, according to Bureau of Land Management officials. The yet-unfinished plans call for two armored battalions, an armored brigade headquarters, an attack helicopter squadron and support facilities designed to accommodate 1,300 to 1,500 soldiers.
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