Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Military Bases New Jersey
IN THE NEWS

United States Military Bases New Jersey

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
Military and FBI officials were investigating the theft of 100 restricted-area badges and more than 1,000 blank military identification cards from a base office, a spokeswoman said Thursday. Someone broke a window to gain entry to the office last weekend, Capt. Deborah Bosick said. No suspects have been identified. Authorities were primarily worried that the stolen cards could be used for admission to the base commissary or for check-cashing and other fraudulent purposes in the community, Bosick said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
Military and FBI officials were investigating the theft of 100 restricted-area badges and more than 1,000 blank military identification cards from a base office, a spokeswoman said Thursday. Someone broke a window to gain entry to the office last weekend, Capt. Deborah Bosick said. No suspects have been identified. Authorities were primarily worried that the stolen cards could be used for admission to the base commissary or for check-cashing and other fraudulent purposes in the community, Bosick said.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 6, 1988
The new commander of Ft. Dix has proposed the first base-wide ban on smoking at a U.S. military installation, the Army said. The sweeping proposal by Maj. Gen. James Wurman would prohibit smoking by the base's 4,000 permanent military personnel and the training population of up to 12,000 soldiers. It would apply inside each of the sprawling base's 1,500 buildings.
NEWS
October 6, 1988
The new commander of Ft. Dix has proposed the first base-wide ban on smoking at a U.S. military installation, the Army said. The sweeping proposal by Maj. Gen. James Wurman would prohibit smoking by the base's 4,000 permanent military personnel and the training population of up to 12,000 soldiers. It would apply inside each of the sprawling base's 1,500 buildings.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|