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NEWS
June 11, 1996 | Reuters
Defense lawyers for William Kreutzer, an Army sergeant accused of opening fire on scores of soldiers during morning calisthenics, told jurors Monday that Kreutzer suffered from depression and was unable to get counseling from the Army before the shooting. Kreutzer, 27, a member of a crack paratrooper unit who had been awarded the Army's Good Conduct Medal, is charged with murdering a fellow 82nd Airborne Division soldier, 38-year-old Maj. Stephen Badger, last October.
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NEWS
October 17, 1997 | From Associated Press
Six Marines and seven civilians were arrested Thursday in a nationwide investigation into the theft of military weapons, including rocket launchers, machine guns, mines, mortars and grenades. Federal undercover agents bought large quantities of weapons and ammunition during an 18-month operation, said William Perry, special agent in charge of the FBI's Charlotte office. Much of the ordnance was stolen from Camp Lejeune, the sprawling Marine base in eastern North Carolina.
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NEWS
March 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A 1993 congressional study warned against concentrating aircraft squadrons at the Air Force base where two planes collided in flight and killed 23 soldiers on the ground. The study by the General Accounting Office cautioned against basing many squadrons of different planes at Pope Air Force Base in Fayetteville, N.C., and Mountain Home Air Force Base in Idaho. Since the end of the Cold War, Pope has been quietly transformed into one of the nation's two special strike force wings.
NEWS
June 11, 1996 | Reuters
Defense lawyers for William Kreutzer, an Army sergeant accused of opening fire on scores of soldiers during morning calisthenics, told jurors Monday that Kreutzer suffered from depression and was unable to get counseling from the Army before the shooting. Kreutzer, 27, a member of a crack paratrooper unit who had been awarded the Army's Good Conduct Medal, is charged with murdering a fellow 82nd Airborne Division soldier, 38-year-old Maj. Stephen Badger, last October.
NEWS
March 6, 1991 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peace in the Middle East transformed Fayetteville, N.C., home of the 82nd Airborne Division, into a jubilant town, one that is anticipating the return of the first large group of U.S. troops as soon as Thursday. So much has changed since a month ago, when Connie Bidwell and two associates began planning a support rally for the troops overseas. Now, she says, the rally--scheduled for Sunday--"has changed to a homecoming celebration."
NEWS
October 30, 1995 | from Associated Press
A weapon recovered near a sniper's ambush at Ft. Bragg, N.C., was bought at a Maryland shop that federal and state officials say has provided guns connected with numerous crimes, a government source said Sunday. A 9-millimeter Glock pistol found at the scene of the shootings Friday was purchased from the Freestate Arms and Munitions gun shop in Temple Hills, Md., in 1990, said the government source, who spoke on condition of not being further identified. Army Sgt. William J.
NEWS
May 11, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A military judge at Ft. Bragg, N.C., rejected an Army sergeant's guilty plea to killing one soldier and wounding 18 others in a sniper attack, officials said. The judge, Col. Peter E. Brownback III, rejected it because prosecutors said they would attempt to show Sgt. William J. Kreutzer was guilty of the more serious crime of premeditated murder. The plea would have carried a maximum sentence of life imprisonment. Under military law, Kreutzer cannot plead guilty to premeditated murder.
NEWS
September 16, 1994 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ritual is familiar: the ships of war leaving the dock, the wives and children waving tearful farewells, members of Congress bellowing about whether the national interest is truly at stake. These are the images of a time when the country is poised on the brink of battle. But in this small and friendly military town near Ft. Bragg--home of the rapid-deployment specialists of the Army's 18th Airborne Corps--such scenes are more than just images. In Spring Lake, war is not a video game.
NEWS
October 17, 1997 | From Associated Press
Six Marines and seven civilians were arrested Thursday in a nationwide investigation into the theft of military weapons, including rocket launchers, machine guns, mines, mortars and grenades. Federal undercover agents bought large quantities of weapons and ammunition during an 18-month operation, said William Perry, special agent in charge of the FBI's Charlotte office. Much of the ordnance was stolen from Camp Lejeune, the sprawling Marine base in eastern North Carolina.
NEWS
May 11, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A military judge at Ft. Bragg, N.C., rejected an Army sergeant's guilty plea to killing one soldier and wounding 18 others in a sniper attack, officials said. The judge, Col. Peter E. Brownback III, rejected it because prosecutors said they would attempt to show Sgt. William J. Kreutzer was guilty of the more serious crime of premeditated murder. The plea would have carried a maximum sentence of life imprisonment. Under military law, Kreutzer cannot plead guilty to premeditated murder.
NEWS
October 30, 1995 | from Associated Press
A weapon recovered near a sniper's ambush at Ft. Bragg, N.C., was bought at a Maryland shop that federal and state officials say has provided guns connected with numerous crimes, a government source said Sunday. A 9-millimeter Glock pistol found at the scene of the shootings Friday was purchased from the Freestate Arms and Munitions gun shop in Temple Hills, Md., in 1990, said the government source, who spoke on condition of not being further identified. Army Sgt. William J.
NEWS
September 16, 1994 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ritual is familiar: the ships of war leaving the dock, the wives and children waving tearful farewells, members of Congress bellowing about whether the national interest is truly at stake. These are the images of a time when the country is poised on the brink of battle. But in this small and friendly military town near Ft. Bragg--home of the rapid-deployment specialists of the Army's 18th Airborne Corps--such scenes are more than just images. In Spring Lake, war is not a video game.
NEWS
March 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A 1993 congressional study warned against concentrating aircraft squadrons at the Air Force base where two planes collided in flight and killed 23 soldiers on the ground. The study by the General Accounting Office cautioned against basing many squadrons of different planes at Pope Air Force Base in Fayetteville, N.C., and Mountain Home Air Force Base in Idaho. Since the end of the Cold War, Pope has been quietly transformed into one of the nation's two special strike force wings.
NEWS
March 6, 1991 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peace in the Middle East transformed Fayetteville, N.C., home of the 82nd Airborne Division, into a jubilant town, one that is anticipating the return of the first large group of U.S. troops as soon as Thursday. So much has changed since a month ago, when Connie Bidwell and two associates began planning a support rally for the troops overseas. Now, she says, the rally--scheduled for Sunday--"has changed to a homecoming celebration."
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