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United States Military Bases Okinawa

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NEWS
July 19, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like the other fiercely independent residents of the island of Okinawa, Aiko Tsujino took to the streets with her volunteer group to help gussy up downtown for the G-8 summit that begins this week. But when President Clinton arrives for the meeting of the world's leading industrialized nations, she'll have mixed feelings at best. "Of course we want to welcome Clinton warmly," said Tsujino, who opened her popular Yunangi tavern 30 years ago, when Okinawa was still a U.S. territory.
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NEWS
July 19, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like the other fiercely independent residents of the island of Okinawa, Aiko Tsujino took to the streets with her volunteer group to help gussy up downtown for the G-8 summit that begins this week. But when President Clinton arrives for the meeting of the world's leading industrialized nations, she'll have mixed feelings at best. "Of course we want to welcome Clinton warmly," said Tsujino, who opened her popular Yunangi tavern 30 years ago, when Okinawa was still a U.S. territory.
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NEWS
November 16, 1998 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Residents of Japan's southernmost island, Okinawa, the linchpin of the U.S. military presence in Asia, narrowly voted out the longtime incumbent governor Sunday after he had vigorously opposed U.S. bases there and elected in his place a businessman who may be more conciliatory to American interests. Keiichi Inamine, 65, who had focused his campaign on reviving the economy, squeaked by Gov. Masahide Ota, 73, whose main platform was ousting the U.S. bases. The vote was 374,833 to 337,369.
NEWS
November 16, 1998 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Residents of Japan's southernmost island, Okinawa, the linchpin of the U.S. military presence in Asia, narrowly voted out the longtime incumbent governor Sunday after he had vigorously opposed U.S. bases there and elected in his place a businessman who may be more conciliatory to American interests. Keiichi Inamine, 65, who had focused his campaign on reviving the economy, squeaked by Gov. Masahide Ota, 73, whose main platform was ousting the U.S. bases. The vote was 374,833 to 337,369.
NEWS
September 14, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Succumbing to the powerful forces arrayed against him, Okinawa Gov. Masahide Ota announced Friday that he is ending his yearlong fight to block the renewal of leases for land used by the U.S. military on his southern Japanese island. "This decision was the most difficult in my six-year career" as governor, a visibly distressed Ota said at a nationally televised news conference. "It was truly painful and severe . . . but I made the decision hoping this result would lead to resolving the issue."
NEWS
September 14, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Succumbing to the powerful forces arrayed against him, Okinawa Gov. Masahide Ota announced Friday that he is ending his yearlong fight to block the renewal of leases for land used by the U.S. military on his southern Japanese island. "This decision was the most difficult in my six-year career" as governor, a visibly distressed Ota said at a nationally televised news conference. "It was truly painful and severe . . . but I made the decision hoping this result would lead to resolving the issue."
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