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United States Military Bases Panama

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October 5, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writers
The chief of state security, two other officers in Panama's military high command and 35 soldiers were arrested after a failed attempt to overthrow dictator Manuel A. Noriega, the government said Wednesday night. The announcement, in a "war communique" read on national television, was the first indication that support for the failed coup Tuesday may have gone beyond the middle-level officers who claimed responsibility for it. Maj. Moises Giroldi Vega, leader of the forces who seized Gen.
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NEWS
March 12, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States formally handed its Rodman Naval Station to Panama, the first of five military bases to be turned over this year ahead of the historic transfer of the Panama Canal. In a simple yet colorful morning ceremony, a contingent of sailors in dress whites gently lowered the Stars and Stripes. Rodman is the first of five bases that the U.S. is relinquishing under a 1977 treaty signed by President Carter that surrenders the entire canal to Panama by Dec. 31.
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NEWS
September 27, 1997 | From Reuters
The U.S. military's Southern Command staff and their families packed their bags for a new home in Miami on Friday, slipping out quietly after an often-controversial 81-year presence in Panama. The last 250 of a 980-strong contingent of the Pentagon's front-line operations in Latin America and the Caribbean boarded two chartered planes at Howard Air Force Base near the Panama Canal and bid a discreet farewell to Panama.
NEWS
September 27, 1997 | From Reuters
The U.S. military's Southern Command staff and their families packed their bags for a new home in Miami on Friday, slipping out quietly after an often-controversial 81-year presence in Panama. The last 250 of a 980-strong contingent of the Pentagon's front-line operations in Latin America and the Caribbean boarded two chartered planes at Howard Air Force Base near the Panama Canal and bid a discreet farewell to Panama.
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Public support for keeping U.S. military bases after the year 2000 has risen to 58%, an increase of nearly 17%, in recent months because of concern over loss of jobs, a public opinion poll found. Only 27.8% of Panamanians favor closing the bases. The nationwide poll of 1,017 Panamanians was taken between Feb. 23 and March 3. Under a 1977 treaty, the United States must close its bases before the year 2000. About 10,000 American troops are based in Panama.
NEWS
August 25, 1988
More than half of the U.S. military personnel in Panama have moved from private homes to the safety of U.S. military bases because of Washington's dispute with Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, a Defense Department spokesman said. "There is a perceived threat to U.S. individuals and property," the spokesman said, adding that Noriega followers had stepped up harassment of U.S.
NEWS
June 23, 1988
The United States is sending 250 more troops to Panama as part of a continuing move to boost security for U.S. installations there, a spokesman for the U.S. Southern Command said. Col. Ronald Sconyers said the additional troops are support personnel needed "to round out" the buildup of security forces that began last March amid rising tensions between Washington and Panama's strongman, Gen. Manuel A. Noriega.
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
About 100 Marines fired rifles and mortars for two hours at a group of 40 to 50 intruders in dark uniforms in the second encounter in two days at a Navy fuel depot near the Panama Canal, U.S. military authorities said Wednesday. Despite the intense gunfire and support from American helicopters with searchlights, the Marines neither inflicted nor suffered casualties, and they captured none of the unidentified trespassers, U.S. officials said.
NEWS
March 12, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States formally handed its Rodman Naval Station to Panama, the first of five military bases to be turned over this year ahead of the historic transfer of the Panama Canal. In a simple yet colorful morning ceremony, a contingent of sailors in dress whites gently lowered the Stars and Stripes. Rodman is the first of five bases that the U.S. is relinquishing under a 1977 treaty signed by President Carter that surrenders the entire canal to Panama by Dec. 31.
NEWS
September 19, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighty-one years of tradition will end Thursday when the United States Southern Command lowers the American flag for the last time over the post that has been the U.S. military headquarters in Latin America. SouthCom, the most controversial remaining symbol of American hegemony in the region, is moving to Miami. Watching SouthCom depart, Panamanians are of two minds.
NEWS
September 7, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Ernesto Perez Balladares of Panama, in the United States for talks with President Clinton, on Wednesday suggested creating a Western Hemisphere anti-narcotics center in one of the American military facilities scheduled to be turned over to Panama at the end of the century. Perez Balladares said at a news conference that Clinton seemed "very interested" in the proposed center, which would encourage cooperation among the region's governments to stop drug trafficking and money laundering.
NEWS
June 6, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You would think Jasmine Nelson, a Panamanian law student, would have more reasons than most people to want to see an end to 90 years of U.S. domination of her country. After all, U.S. firepower destroyed her neighborhood during the 1989 invasion that ousted Gen. Manuel A. Noriega. She spent her formative years schooled in the anti-imperialist rhetoric of the 1980s. She believes that the Panama Canal ought to be run by Panamanians and that U.S.
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Public support for keeping U.S. military bases after the year 2000 has risen to 58%, an increase of nearly 17%, in recent months because of concern over loss of jobs, a public opinion poll found. Only 27.8% of Panamanians favor closing the bases. The nationwide poll of 1,017 Panamanians was taken between Feb. 23 and March 3. Under a 1977 treaty, the United States must close its bases before the year 2000. About 10,000 American troops are based in Panama.
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The people don't applaud U.S. troops so much these days. T-shirts bearing pro-U.S. invasion slogans hang unsold in the shops. And politicians are beginning to think they can make a name for themselves by criticizing U.S. policy. The bloom may not be entirely off the rose, but the petals are fading amid signs of uncertainty in relations between Washington and the coalition government the United States installed after the invasion last December.
NEWS
December 24, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At H-hour, 1 a.m. Wednesday, a team of 20 Navy SEAL commandos stole onto Paitilla airfield intent on disabling the airplanes that Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega was expected to use to flee the massive American onslaught. According to intelligence reports, the airfield was lightly defended. But instead of the expected cakewalk, the SEALs encountered three armored personnel carriers full of heavily armed and well-trained troops. A "hellacious fire-fight" ensued.
NEWS
November 21, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Security has been tightened at all U.S. military installations in Panama because unidentified terrorists linked to the Latin American drug cartels have threatened to attack American targets there, Administration sources said Monday. U.S. officials in Washington said that the threat, received a week ago, is being taken "very seriously." They declined to be more specific, citing security concerns.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writers
The chief of state security, two other officers in Panama's military high command and 35 soldiers were arrested after a failed attempt to overthrow dictator Manuel A. Noriega, the government said Wednesday night. The announcement, in a "war communique" read on national television, was the first indication that support for the failed coup Tuesday may have gone beyond the middle-level officers who claimed responsibility for it. Maj. Moises Giroldi Vega, leader of the forces who seized Gen.
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