Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Military Bases San Francisco
IN THE NEWS

United States Military Bases San Francisco

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 11, 1987 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
The FBI is investigating allegations that 37 or more children were molested at a child-care center at the Presidio Army base here since mid-1985, authorities said Monday. At least four children contracted chlamydia, a common, treatable venereal disease, Presidio spokesman Bob Mahoney said. Another child initially tested positive for exposure to the acquired immune deficiency syndrome virus, but a more reliable test showed no infection.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 9, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Marine Corps thought it had found the ideal spot to practice an amphibious landing in a "hostile urban environment": the city of San Francisco. But the Corps soon learned just how hostile the environment can be here, when the National Park Service rejected its request to come ashore on a beach at the Presidio, the 222-year-old fort that became a national park in 1994. "I'll be very honest, I was shocked," said Lt.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 27, 1991 | Associated Press
The Army plans to vacate the Presidio in September, 1994, a year earlier than originally scheduled, according to a National Park Service official. Brian O'Neill, superintendent of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, told local officials Tuesday that he learned of the new date from "pretty current" information. But the 6th Army public affairs office at the San Francisco base denied that any change in the target date has been decided.
NEWS
October 3, 1994 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In military-speak, a force of "civilian personnel" numbering in the tens of thousands "invaded" the U.S. Army's venerable Presidio over the weekend, marking the moment when the seaside promontory that is the nation's oldest military base fell into the hands of the public. After four years of planning and discussions, the Army retreated to occupy about a third of the sprawling, largely forested facility at the south end of the Golden Gate Bridge on Friday.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While it provoked fury in many military towns across the country, the Pentagon's latest base-closing list was greeted Friday in a few locales as nothing less than salvation--and proof that strenuous politicking can pay off. Such was the sentiment in Alameda, Calif., where the Alameda Naval Depot and Naval Air Station were spared from the shutdown that has been threatened intermittently for two decades.
NEWS
February 5, 1988
Hawaii Sen. Daniel Inouye said he has it on good authority that the battleship Missouri will be home-ported in Pearl Harbor instead of the Navy's first choice, San Francisco. Inouye told the Honolulu Advertiser that he had heard from "very reliable sources" of the decision to base the battleship in Hawaii. A spokesman for the Navy in Washington and at Pacific Fleet headquarters in Honolulu said they had heard nothing about the assignment of the renovated battleship to Pearl Harbor.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
A compromise added to a $286-million defense appropriations bill now before the U.S. Senate is increasing the possibility that some military functions could continue at San Francisco's historic Presidio even after most of it is closed and converted into a national park.
NEWS
April 23, 1987 | MIKE MILLS, Times Staff Writer
A Senate Armed Services subcommittee approved a $27.5-million plan Wednesday to build a Navy home port in San Francisco and to upgrade the one in Long Beach. A House committee turned down a similar provision in its version of the legislation earlier this month but is now showing growing acceptance of the idea.
NEWS
October 24, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) Friday lost a last-ditch effort to save a Navy plan that would have based the battleship Missouri in San Francisco next year. Senate members of a conference committee attempting to work out differences with their House counterparts on defense authorization legislation Friday turned down Wilson's $11-million compromise proposal.
NEWS
August 12, 1994 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past two years, national park planners have proclaimed that the historic Presidio will be a "national park unlike any other." Their prediction is coming true, but not the way they envisioned. When the National Park Service officially takes over the scenic Army post Oct. 1, the Presidio will be the only national park occupied primarily by the U.S. Army.
NEWS
October 21, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Park Service has unveiled the details of its sweeping $590-million plan to convert the historic Presidio Army post here into a "global center" to address environmental problems and foster international cooperation. In a break with traditional park management, the Park Service has called for leasing most of the post's 510 historic buildings to private, nonprofit groups that would stage conferences, establish visitor centers, provide workshops and conduct scientific research.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the United States began cranking up its military machine before World War II, Alameda sprang into being. Now a pleasant bay-side community with scores of renovated Victorians and a serene, 1950s feel, it came of age as a Navy town just south of Oakland. With the coming closure of the Alameda Naval Air Station and a key tenant, the Alameda Naval Aviation Depot--and the eventual loss of about 8,700 military and civilian jobs--the city of 80,000 faces dramatic changes.
NEWS
June 28, 1993 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unexpected act of compassion, the federal base closing commission voted Sunday to spare the Navy Supply Center in Oakland, but moments later decided to shut down two other facilities in the hard-hit Bay Area. The actions brought projected Bay Area job losses as the result of base cuts to 25,600.
NEWS
August 12, 1992 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a salon at the top of the Transamerica pyramid, diplomats from five continents gathered over Chardonnay and prawns to hear a revolutionary marketing appeal. The pitch: The U.S. government wants foreign countries to invest in turning one of this nation's most historic military posts--the Presidio of San Francisco--into a global center for solving the world's problems.
NEWS
June 27, 1991 | Associated Press
The Army plans to vacate the Presidio in September, 1994, a year earlier than originally scheduled, according to a National Park Service official. Brian O'Neill, superintendent of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, told local officials Tuesday that he learned of the new date from "pretty current" information. But the 6th Army public affairs office at the San Francisco base denied that any change in the target date has been decided.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While it provoked fury in many military towns across the country, the Pentagon's latest base-closing list was greeted Friday in a few locales as nothing less than salvation--and proof that strenuous politicking can pay off. Such was the sentiment in Alameda, Calif., where the Alameda Naval Depot and Naval Air Station were spared from the shutdown that has been threatened intermittently for two decades.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|