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NEWS
July 21, 1988
U.S. Marines based in Panama twice exchanged gunfire with unidentified intruders spotted at an American military installation near the Panama Canal, according to the U.S. Southern Command. No one was reported injured. A statement released by the Southern Command's press office said the first incident occurred Tuesday afternoon when a Marine patrol encountered two armed intruders close to a fuel depot near Howard Air Base.
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NEWS
February 26, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton told a high-level delegation from Saudi Arabia on Tuesday that he is determined to do whatever is necessary to protect U.S. forces in the desert kingdom from the sort of terrorist bombing that killed 19 Air Force personnel last year as they slept in their barracks in Dhahran. White House Press Secretary Mike McCurry, who told reporters of Clinton's assertion, supplied no details about increased security precautions. But the U.S.
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NEWS
July 20, 1996 | From Associated Press
A U.S. team inspected a military housing complex Friday where 19 American airmen died in a bombing last month, hoping to find ways to prevent future terrorist attacks. The 40-member team led by retired Army Gen. Wayne Downing will also seek Saudi cooperation to improve security around U.S. military bases. The FBI is looking for clues to determine who carried out the June 25 bombing.
NEWS
July 20, 1996 | From Associated Press
A U.S. team inspected a military housing complex Friday where 19 American airmen died in a bombing last month, hoping to find ways to prevent future terrorist attacks. The 40-member team led by retired Army Gen. Wayne Downing will also seek Saudi cooperation to improve security around U.S. military bases. The FBI is looking for clues to determine who carried out the June 25 bombing.
NEWS
June 27, 1996 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The massive 5,000-pound truck bomb that killed 19 Americans in Saudi Arabia on Tuesday could have had deadly impact as far as three-fourths of a mile away--a far greater range than the 100 feet that U.S. officials allowed as a security barrier. "The security measures in place were not adequate to protect against casualties in this bombing," said Brian Jenkins, a terrorism expert at the international security firm Kroll & Associates.
NEWS
February 26, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton told a high-level delegation from Saudi Arabia on Tuesday that he is determined to do whatever is necessary to protect U.S. forces in the desert kingdom from the sort of terrorist bombing that killed 19 Air Force personnel last year as they slept in their barracks in Dhahran. White House Press Secretary Mike McCurry, who told reporters of Clinton's assertion, supplied no details about increased security precautions. But the U.S.
NEWS
June 28, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Air Force officials in Saudi Arabia adopted tighter security practices Thursday in response to what they see as a continuing terrorist threat. Following Tuesday night's deadly bombing, military experts met with Saudi counterparts to look at widening the security perimeter around the targeted American compound and to erect stronger barriers against possible attackers, an Air Force general said.
NEWS
June 30, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As troops began installing a 400-foot security perimeter around a military compound bombed by terrorists last week, President Clinton on Saturday appointed a retired general to carry out a "full assessment" of the attack and to review the safety of U.S. forces across the Middle East. The installation of the widened buffer around the Khobar Towers housing complex near Dhahran was announced during a visit by Defense Secretary William J.
NEWS
January 13, 1991 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Security at Orange County, San Diego and other California military bases has heightened as local officials brace for potential terrorist attacks and the country veers toward a possible war, Pentagon officials said Friday. At Navy bases across the state, officials have issued a "condition alpha," or a low-level security alert.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a startling breach of military security, 10 civilians clad in Army uniforms and wearing authentic-looking ID cards gained entry to the U.S. Seabee base here last weekend and conducted a class in infantry tactics, base officials said Wednesday. The nine men and one woman, members of a group calling itself U.S.
NEWS
June 30, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As troops began installing a 400-foot security perimeter around a military compound bombed by terrorists last week, President Clinton on Saturday appointed a retired general to carry out a "full assessment" of the attack and to review the safety of U.S. forces across the Middle East. The installation of the widened buffer around the Khobar Towers housing complex near Dhahran was announced during a visit by Defense Secretary William J.
NEWS
June 28, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Air Force officials in Saudi Arabia adopted tighter security practices Thursday in response to what they see as a continuing terrorist threat. Following Tuesday night's deadly bombing, military experts met with Saudi counterparts to look at widening the security perimeter around the targeted American compound and to erect stronger barriers against possible attackers, an Air Force general said.
NEWS
June 27, 1996 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The massive 5,000-pound truck bomb that killed 19 Americans in Saudi Arabia on Tuesday could have had deadly impact as far as three-fourths of a mile away--a far greater range than the 100 feet that U.S. officials allowed as a security barrier. "The security measures in place were not adequate to protect against casualties in this bombing," said Brian Jenkins, a terrorism expert at the international security firm Kroll & Associates.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | JEFF MEYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the Cold War, a small group of men reportedly infiltrated Point Mugu Naval Air Weapons Station and bivouacked on the beach under cover of night. The next morning, the Navy took them by surprise. In a textbook two-pronged assault, an amphibious landing craft crashed through the surf while jeeps rolled across the sand. Outgunned and outflanked, the men surrendered. And the base was once again safe from surfers.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a startling breach of military security, 10 civilians clad in Army uniforms and wearing authentic-looking ID cards gained entry to the U.S. Seabee base here last weekend and conducted a class in infantry tactics, base officials said Wednesday. The nine men and one woman, members of a group calling itself U.S.
NEWS
January 13, 1991 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Security at Orange County, San Diego and other California military bases has heightened as local officials brace for potential terrorist attacks and the country veers toward a possible war, Pentagon officials said Friday. At Navy bases across the state, officials have issued a "condition alpha," or a low-level security alert.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Lax security and sloppy record-keeping at U.S. Army posts in Europe expose billions of dollars worth of military supplies, including some of the nation's most sophisticated weapons, to theft by terrorist groups or diversion for profit, a congressional study released Wednesday warned. At one post in West Germany, it took supply officers almost a year to locate 24 Stinger anti-aircraft missiles in their inventory after the Army requested them for training exercises elsewhere.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | JEFF MEYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the Cold War, a small group of men reportedly infiltrated Point Mugu Naval Air Weapons Station and bivouacked on the beach under cover of night. The next morning, the Navy took them by surprise. In a textbook two-pronged assault, an amphibious landing craft crashed through the surf while jeeps rolled across the sand. Outgunned and outflanked, the men surrendered. And the base was once again safe from surfers.
NEWS
July 21, 1988
U.S. Marines based in Panama twice exchanged gunfire with unidentified intruders spotted at an American military installation near the Panama Canal, according to the U.S. Southern Command. No one was reported injured. A statement released by the Southern Command's press office said the first incident occurred Tuesday afternoon when a Marine patrol encountered two armed intruders close to a fuel depot near Howard Air Base.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Lax security and sloppy record-keeping at U.S. Army posts in Europe expose billions of dollars worth of military supplies, including some of the nation's most sophisticated weapons, to theft by terrorist groups or diversion for profit, a congressional study released Wednesday warned. At one post in West Germany, it took supply officers almost a year to locate 24 Stinger anti-aircraft missiles in their inventory after the Army requested them for training exercises elsewhere.
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