Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Military Bases Southern California
IN THE NEWS

United States Military Bases Southern California

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in the not too distant past, when the Southern California economy was robust and passenger demand for air travel seemed limitless, regional airport planners worried--almost wistfully--about the day when new terminals and runways would be needed. Now, they really are worried.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 20, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a time when Oceanside was proud to call itself home to one of the nation's most populous Marine Corps bases. But time--like a good Marine--marches on and now Oceanside is trying to refashion its downtown as a resort and entertainment center, with a beachfront hotel, museums, a 16-screen movie theater, restaurants and more.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 20, 1994 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the budget ax falls on military posts across the nation, this vast aerospace stronghold--once a stomping ground for "Right Stuff" test pilots, now a landing ground for space shuttles--remains a prosperous contradiction. In an era of defense downsizing, its $457-million budget is substantially fatter this year than last. Its 15,000 employees bustle confidently among hangars, offices and classrooms. Dozens of sleek military jets take off and land each day, as they have for years.
NEWS
September 4, 1996 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the heart of the soon-to-be-shuttered Long Beach Naval Station is a ficus-studded lane that leads from a breezy waterfront vista to a sparkling 25-meter pool and a professional-quality basketball court. Around the corner sit four fully lighted softball fields with fresh chalk on the baselines. And down the road, on the other side of a chain-link fence, a bulldozer waits to devour it all.
NEWS
March 11, 1991 | DEAN E. MURPHY and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was dark, late and cold, but Kim Watrous and three of his buddies would not budge from their post on a dirt shoulder along Cactus Avenue early Sunday morning. The four Vietnam veterans had come to the gate of March Air Force Base outside Riverside with a clear purpose in mind. "We wanted to let these Marines know they're welcome home just as much as those who arrived yesterday," said Watrous, standing beside his red Chevrolet truck adorned with an assortment of American and military flags.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1995
This school's educational program will be as unusual as its history: Former Navy housing on Long Beach's west side will become a school for ninth-graders only. Class size at Savannah Academy will be limited to 25-29 students, compared to a Long Beach Unified School District average of 32. Classes will be 90 minutes long instead of the usual 53 minutes. The curriculum will focus on academic skills--only reading, writing, math and computer literacy will be taught.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1995
Amid the huge empty buildings of the former General Dynamics missile plant in Pomona, where thousands once toiled, Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) pledged Monday to help the city acquire the idle site from the U.S. Navy and develop it to create jobs through new industries. "The opportunities here for jobs and economic growth are endless. This is such a fabulous property for development," said Boxer, who toured the plant with city leaders.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | SONNI EFRON and NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Residents surrounding the U.S. Marine Corps Air Station at El Toro were warned Friday about increasing aircraft noise this weekend, the latest sign that the nationwide military alert in response to Iraqi aggression is being felt on the home front.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1991
Vons Cos. said it will donate 30 trailer loads of food and other products to five major military bases in Southern California to assist servicemen and servicewomen and their families who have been affected by the Middle East crisis. Harrods, the landmark London department store, said it will cut 600 jobs, 14% of its work force, due to sales hit by recession and a sharp drop in tourism, resulting from the war.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1993 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in the not too distant past, when the Southern California economy was robust and passenger demand for air travel seemed limitless, regional airport planners worried--almost wistfully--about the day when new terminals and runways would be needed. Now, they really are worried.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1995
Amid the huge empty buildings of the former General Dynamics missile plant in Pomona, where thousands once toiled, Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) pledged Monday to help the city acquire the idle site from the U.S. Navy and develop it to create jobs through new industries. "The opportunities here for jobs and economic growth are endless. This is such a fabulous property for development," said Boxer, who toured the plant with city leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1995 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For better than five decades, this vast desert military reserve has been a proving ground for some of America's fastest and most exotic aircraft, from the XP-59, the nation's first jet, to the radar-dodging B-2 bomber. For much of that time, the base also has been a dumping ground for vast amounts of toxic chemicals, from aviation fuel and solvents to experimental rocket propellants. Leaky pipelines left an underground water table contaminated with 300,000 gallons of jet fuel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1995
This school's educational program will be as unusual as its history: Former Navy housing on Long Beach's west side will become a school for ninth-graders only. Class size at Savannah Academy will be limited to 25-29 students, compared to a Long Beach Unified School District average of 32. Classes will be 90 minutes long instead of the usual 53 minutes. The curriculum will focus on academic skills--only reading, writing, math and computer literacy will be taught.
NEWS
July 20, 1994 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the budget ax falls on military posts across the nation, this vast aerospace stronghold--once a stomping ground for "Right Stuff" test pilots, now a landing ground for space shuttles--remains a prosperous contradiction. In an era of defense downsizing, its $457-million budget is substantially fatter this year than last. Its 15,000 employees bustle confidently among hangars, offices and classrooms. Dozens of sleek military jets take off and land each day, as they have for years.
NEWS
July 20, 1994 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the budget ax falls on military posts across the nation, this vast aerospace stronghold--once a stomping ground for "Right Stuff" test pilots, now a landing ground for space shuttles--remains a prosperous contradiction. In an era of defense downsizing, its $457-million budget is substantially fatter this year than last. Its 15,000 employees bustle confidently among hangars, offices and classrooms. Dozens of sleek military jets take off and land each day, as they have for years.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in the not too distant past, when the Southern California economy was robust and passenger demand for air travel seemed limitless, regional airport planners worried--almost wistfully--about the day when new terminals and runways would be needed. Now, they really are worried.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1995 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For better than five decades, this vast desert military reserve has been a proving ground for some of America's fastest and most exotic aircraft, from the XP-59, the nation's first jet, to the radar-dodging B-2 bomber. For much of that time, the base also has been a dumping ground for vast amounts of toxic chemicals, from aviation fuel and solvents to experimental rocket propellants. Leaky pipelines left an underground water table contaminated with 300,000 gallons of jet fuel.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Edwards Air Force Base, contaminated by nitric acid, solvents and other volatile substances, has been proposed for the first time as one of 94 national environmental priority sites, according to a report released Friday. Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base in San Diego County was also nominated to be added to the priority list for cleanup because of potential ground-water and soil contamination from PCBs, pesticides, solvents and fuels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1993 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While most U.S. military installations are facing cutbacks in this post-Cold War world, Edwards Air Force Base finds itself in the unusual position of dealing with growth. "This is a great position to be in," said Maj. Gen. Roy D. Bridges Jr., Edwards AFB commander. The sprawling Air Force flight test center is in the midst of about $42.4-million worth of construction projects to accommodate the relocation of an Ohio test wing.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|