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United States Military Bases Turkey

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NEWS
March 17, 1987 | United Press International
The United States and Turkey signed an agreement Monday preserving American military bases in Turkey until 1990 and giving Turkey better access to U.S. markets and the right to co-produce some American weapons. The letters of agreement signed at the State Department by Secretary of State George P. Shultz and Turkish Foreign Minister Vahit Halefoglu support an earlier agreement renewing the leases on 27 American air and naval bases and intelligence and logistical installations in Turkey.
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NEWS
June 18, 1992 | MURRAY WAAS and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A year after manipulating Agriculture Department credits in an ill-fated attempt to influence Saddam Hussein's regime in Iraq, the Bush Administration found itself bending the rules of another agriculture program to ensure the regional cooperation it needed to bomb his nation, according to confidential documents and interviews. In February, 1991, at the height of the Persian Gulf War, then-Agriculture Secretary Clayton K. Yeutter approved U.S. aid to Turkey's state-owned tobacco monopoly.
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NEWS
August 10, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite their reluctance to be drawn into a U.S.-directed military confrontation with Iraq, Turkish leaders on Thursday assured Secretary of State James A. Baker III that U.S. forces could use strategic Turkish bases if war breaks out, a Bush Administration official said. In the event of full-scale hostilities, "I am confident we can count on our allies the Turks," the official told reporters on Baker's plane after Baker met with Turkish President Turgut Ozal and other leaders.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | Wm. D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Threatening retaliation, Iraq on Wednesday accused Turkey of unprovoked aggression in allowing U.S. warplanes to attack Iraqi targets from the Incirlik Air Base on the outskirts of this southern city. There was no immediate response from a Turkish government that has been reluctant to acknowledge the raids from Incirlik, which have given allied forces a second front in the air war against Iraq.
NEWS
June 18, 1992 | MURRAY WAAS and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A year after manipulating Agriculture Department credits in an ill-fated attempt to influence Saddam Hussein's regime in Iraq, the Bush Administration found itself bending the rules of another agriculture program to ensure the regional cooperation it needed to bomb his nation, according to confidential documents and interviews. In February, 1991, at the height of the Persian Gulf War, then-Agriculture Secretary Clayton K. Yeutter approved U.S. aid to Turkey's state-owned tobacco monopoly.
NEWS
February 28, 1988 | Associated Press
The government on Saturday approved the renewal of a defense cooperation pact with the United States that was signed by the two countries almost a year ago, the Foreign Ministry announced. The pact gives the United States access to a dozen military installations in Turkey, including two electronic listening posts that monitor Soviet military activities and nuclear tests. Prime Minister Turgut Ozal's Cabinet, disappointed by the position of the U.S.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | Wm. D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Threatening retaliation, Iraq on Wednesday accused Turkey of unprovoked aggression in allowing U.S. warplanes to attack Iraqi targets from the Incirlik Air Base on the outskirts of this southern city. There was no immediate response from a Turkish government that has been reluctant to acknowledge the raids from Incirlik, which have given allied forces a second front in the air war against Iraq.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Afraid?" mocked the raven-haired seamstress on a balcony as a landing American warplane swept past, 200 feet above her perch. "I am a Turk!" Saucy Rabia Sahin, who sews in a sweatshop at the head of the runway of the Incirlik Air Base near here, spoke for many Wednesday in a city unabashed by threat. In Adana, platform for repeated American raids against Iraq, blood is beginning to rise to the heat of war.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the relief of American military personnel facing possible combat in Iraq--and facing mounds of garbage as well--the Turkish government Friday ordered striking workers back to their jobs at this big air base in southern Turkey. Janitors, secretaries, gardeners, trash collectors, service station attendants, drivers and other support personnel, all members of the Harb-Bis Sendika, or War Workers' Union, trudged glumly back to work under government orders.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Afraid?" mocked the raven-haired seamstress on a balcony as a landing American warplane swept past, 200 feet above her perch. "I am a Turk!" Saucy Rabia Sahin, who sews in a sweatshop at the head of the runway of the Incirlik Air Base near here, spoke for many Wednesday in a city unabashed by threat. In Adana, platform for repeated American raids against Iraq, blood is beginning to rise to the heat of war.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the relief of American military personnel facing possible combat in Iraq--and facing mounds of garbage as well--the Turkish government Friday ordered striking workers back to their jobs at this big air base in southern Turkey. Janitors, secretaries, gardeners, trash collectors, service station attendants, drivers and other support personnel, all members of the Harb-Bis Sendika, or War Workers' Union, trudged glumly back to work under government orders.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite their reluctance to be drawn into a U.S.-directed military confrontation with Iraq, Turkish leaders on Thursday assured Secretary of State James A. Baker III that U.S. forces could use strategic Turkish bases if war breaks out, a Bush Administration official said. In the event of full-scale hostilities, "I am confident we can count on our allies the Turks," the official told reporters on Baker's plane after Baker met with Turkish President Turgut Ozal and other leaders.
NEWS
February 28, 1988 | Associated Press
The government on Saturday approved the renewal of a defense cooperation pact with the United States that was signed by the two countries almost a year ago, the Foreign Ministry announced. The pact gives the United States access to a dozen military installations in Turkey, including two electronic listening posts that monitor Soviet military activities and nuclear tests. Prime Minister Turgut Ozal's Cabinet, disappointed by the position of the U.S.
NEWS
March 17, 1987 | United Press International
The United States and Turkey signed an agreement Monday preserving American military bases in Turkey until 1990 and giving Turkey better access to U.S. markets and the right to co-produce some American weapons. The letters of agreement signed at the State Department by Secretary of State George P. Shultz and Turkish Foreign Minister Vahit Halefoglu support an earlier agreement renewing the leases on 27 American air and naval bases and intelligence and logistical installations in Turkey.
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