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United States Military Bases Ventura County

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1993 | JEFF MEYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the Cold War, a small group of men reportedly infiltrated Point Mugu Naval Air Weapons Station and bivouacked on the beach under cover of night. The next morning, the Navy took them by surprise. In a textbook two-pronged assault, an amphibious landing craft crashed through the surf while Jeeps rolled across the sand. Outgunned and outflanked, the men surrendered. And the base was once again safe from surfers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1999 | GREG HAAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An American wearing a Kevlar helmet and flak vest hands an 8-foot sheet of corrugated roofing to another similarly dressed sailor on a snow-covered roof. The man on the roof slips slightly, but catches his balance. He, in turn, hands the sheet to two sailors in battle dress who lay the roofing and hammer it in place, causing small explosions of snow to fall to the ground. The current mission of the Seabees' Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 40 is to assemble corrugated roofs on classrooms.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1997 | NICK GREEN and LORENZA MUNOZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite the Pentagon's announcement Monday that a new round of base closures will look squarely at weapons testing centers, Ventura County leaders say they are well prepared to fend off any assault on Point Mugu Navy base. The Navy's plan to move four squadrons of E-2C Hawkeyes here, efforts to draw private projects and a regional alliance to protect West Coast installations should help save Point Mugu, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1997 | NICK GREEN and LORENZA MUNOZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite the Pentagon's announcement Monday that a new round of base closures will look squarely at weapons testing centers, Ventura County leaders say they are well prepared to fend off any assault on Point Mugu Navy base. The Navy's plan to move four squadrons of E-2C Hawkeyes here, efforts to draw private projects and a regional alliance to protect West Coast installations should help save Point Mugu, officials said.
NEWS
January 28, 1995 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County leaders are encouraged that the Pentagon has decided to scale back the number of military bases recommended for closure this year, but vowed Friday to remain vigilant in their campaign to keep the area's two Navy bases off any hit list. "It's good news and increases our comfort level," said Carolyn Leavens, co-chairwoman of the countywide BRAC '95 Task Force set up to defend local bases.
NEWS
December 16, 1994 | MARC LACEY
The Ventura Ten came to Washington with a mission. Bunking at the Quality Hotel for $69 a night, the former congressman, retired naval officer, citrus rancher and some of Ventura County's most heavyweight politicos felt the weight of an entire county resting on their shoulders. In three quick days they had to save their county from economic obliteration by persuading the Pentagon brass to save two Navy bases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1993 | JEFF MEYERS
A Camarillo Airport official has questioned the accuracy of a report claiming that Air Force munitions are buried on the property. The airport property, which was the site of Oxnard Air Force Base from 1965 to 1969, was listed Tuesday in an Associated Press story about aging explosives that remain hidden at 259 U. S. military installations and are scheduled to be cleaned up by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers in the next five years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1993 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eager to accept the Navy's offer to allow civilian flights at the Point Mugu Naval Air Station, Ventura County leaders are preparing to seek federal money to study the viability of a new commercial airport. Peter Melia, a regional official with the Federal Aviation Administration, said Friday that a new Ventura County airport merits study because the federal agency wants to reduce flight congestion at airfields in neighboring Los Angeles County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1993 | MAIA DAVIS
As part of the Star Wars defense program, the waters off the Ventura County coast could become the next site for testing how well U.S. weapons do at shooting down long-range missiles from other countries, Army officials said Wednesday. Officials from the U.S.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1995 | JACK SEARLES
Ventura County's economy should continue to improve in 1995--unless. The big "unless" that could derail the county's recovery from the recession is the threatened closure of the Navy bases at Point Mugu and Port Hueneme, says Jamshid Damooei, economics professor at Cal Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks. If the bases remain open, Damooei believes that the new year will see improved retail sales, reduced unemployment and more companies moving into the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1997 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Point Mugu Navy base is again in danger of closure unless quick action is taken locally to persuade federal officials and the Pentagon of the base's strategic importance, local boosters said Friday. After a briefing on developments in Washington, county officials said the next round of base closures is expected in 1999 or 2001.
NEWS
February 5, 1995 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Point Mugu and Port Hueneme Navy bases have survived the first round of cuts in the lengthy base closure process as the Pentagon prepares its final list of recommended installations to shut down, military sources have told The Times. In this early but important round, the sources said, the Navy has decided to keep both Ventura County bases off its recommended "hit list" of installations no longer needed in the post-Cold War era.
NEWS
January 28, 1995 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County leaders are encouraged that the Pentagon has decided to scale back the number of military bases recommended for closure this year, but vowed Friday to remain vigilant in their campaign to keep the area's two Navy bases off any hit list. "It's good news and increases our comfort level," said Carolyn Leavens, co-chairwoman of the countywide BRAC '95 Task Force set up to defend local bases.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1995 | Jack Searles
A little-known operation of giant Martin Marietta Corp. provides an example of the kind of business that could go elsewhere if Ventura County's Navy bases at Point Mugu and Port Hueneme are closed. The unit is an engineering and maintenance facility based at Hueneme's Naval Surface Warfare Center. Actually, it's been active at both Hueneme and Mugu.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1995 | JACK SEARLES
Ventura County's economy should continue to improve in 1995--unless. The big "unless" that could derail the county's recovery from the recession is the threatened closure of the Navy bases at Point Mugu and Port Hueneme, says Jamshid Damooei, economics professor at Cal Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks. If the bases remain open, Damooei believes that the new year will see improved retail sales, reduced unemployment and more companies moving into the county.
NEWS
December 16, 1994 | MARC LACEY
The Ventura Ten came to Washington with a mission. Bunking at the Quality Hotel for $69 a night, the former congressman, retired naval officer, citrus rancher and some of Ventura County's most heavyweight politicos felt the weight of an entire county resting on their shoulders. In three quick days they had to save their county from economic obliteration by persuading the Pentagon brass to save two Navy bases.
NEWS
October 13, 1991 | RON SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A widening federal investigation at the Point Mugu Naval Air Station is turning up evidence that several civilian employees have defrauded the government out of millions of dollars in the purchase of goods used at the big weapons testing facility, The Times has learned. The investigation also has uncovered questionable practices by a handful of base officers in the purchase of merchandise for their offices, a knowledgeable source said.
NEWS
February 5, 1995 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Point Mugu and Port Hueneme Navy bases have survived the first round of cuts in the lengthy base closure process as the Pentagon prepares its final list of recommended installations to shut down, military sources have told The Times. In this early but important round, the sources said, the Navy has decided to keep both Ventura County bases off its recommended "hit list" of installations no longer needed in the post-Cold War era.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1993 | JEFF MEYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the Cold War, a small group of men reportedly infiltrated Point Mugu Naval Air Weapons Station and bivouacked on the beach under cover of night. The next morning, the Navy took them by surprise. In a textbook two-pronged assault, an amphibious landing craft crashed through the surf while Jeeps rolled across the sand. Outgunned and outflanked, the men surrendered. And the base was once again safe from surfers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1993 | MAIA DAVIS
As part of the Star Wars defense program, the waters off the Ventura County coast could become the next site for testing how well U.S. weapons do at shooting down long-range missiles from other countries, Army officials said Wednesday. Officials from the U.S.
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