Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Military Confrontations Afghanistan
IN THE NEWS

United States Military Confrontations Afghanistan

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 10, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Friday continued an intense round of meetings with foreign leaders as he prepared to address the U.N. General Assembly today. After speaking by telephone with the president of Nicaragua, Bush met in the Oval Office separately with the foreign minister of Morocco, the prime ministers of India and the Czech Republic and the foreign minister of Saudi Arabia. The near-constant stream of foreign leaders to the White House since the Sept.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 27, 2002 | BOB DROGIN and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Calling for a change in White House policy, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell has asked President Bush to ensure that international rules of war govern the treatment of 460 suspected Taliban and Al Qaeda fighters who have been captured in Afghanistan and are in U.S. custody, administration officials said Saturday. The State Department urged the president to give the 158 detainees at the U.S.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 30, 2001 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Taliban's ambassador to Pakistan said Monday that thousands of armed volunteers camped at the border in northwestern Pakistan are not needed yet inside Afghanistan because "we already have plenty of moujahedeen on the front line." The arrival of thousands more fighters in a makeshift convoy of trucks and buses, Taliban Ambassador Abdul Salam Zaeef said, "will create congestion on the roads and increase the chances of mass casualties from an airstrike."
NEWS
January 7, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
What a difference a war makes. When George W. Bush was inaugurated last year, he was widely seen as a neophyte in world affairs. During the campaign, he'd been caught short on the names of foreign leaders. He came to office with limited foreign travel, much of it on vacations. And little of his father's long diplomatic experience--at the United Nations, the CIA, in China and during his own presidency--seemed to have rubbed off.
NEWS
October 9, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration has notified the United Nations in a letter disclosed Monday that the war on terrorism might extend beyond Afghanistan and could continue even if Osama bin Laden is killed or captured. The message--dated Sunday and signed by John D. Negroponte, the U.S. ambassador to the world body--puts the U.N. on notice that the current U.S. military action is unlikely to end quickly and could become far more controversial in countries that now nominally support the effort.
NEWS
September 25, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Vatican, citing the principle of self-defense to save lives, said it would understand if the United States had to resort to force to protect its citizens from future threats. But it prefers a nonviolent solution to the crisis spawned by the suicide attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon and wants any action to be a response to terrorism and not aimed against Islam. The Vatican's position on the international crisis and the moral legitimacy of an eventual U.S.
NEWS
January 6, 2002 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Omar has slipped through the fingers of U.S. and anti-Taliban forces yet again, several sources said Saturday, after nearly a week of reports that the mysterious cleric had finally been cornered. One security official in the south-central Afghan city of Baghran said Omar had sped away on a motorcycle. Another official said he'd never been there at all.
NEWS
October 12, 2001 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Islamic Republic's first demonstration against the West for its campaign in Afghanistan took place this week in this holy city where Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini became a cleric. But even here, where hatred toward the U.S. government is as deeply rooted as the demand that women cover every strand of hair beneath the black drape of a chador, participants played down the significance of the rally. "It wasn't a protest.
NEWS
January 7, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
What a difference a war makes. When George W. Bush was inaugurated last year, he was widely seen as a neophyte in world affairs. During the campaign, he'd been caught short on the names of foreign leaders. He came to office with limited foreign travel, much of it on vacations. And little of his father's long diplomatic experience--at the United Nations, the CIA, in China and during his own presidency--seemed to have rubbed off.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2001 | DAVID FOLKENFLIK, BALTIMORE SUN
CBS has former Defense Secretary William S. Cohen, while NBC boasts former Army Gen. and anti-drug czar Barry McCaffrey. CNN relies on retired Air Force Gen. Don Shepperd and former NATO Supreme Allied Commander Wesley Clark. The list of notables goes on, news division by news division. In calmer times, these people are known as sources, the kind of informed observers who can shed light on noteworthy developments. During a crisis, they are transformed into paid consultants.
NEWS
January 6, 2002 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Omar has slipped through the fingers of U.S. and anti-Taliban forces yet again, several sources said Saturday, after nearly a week of reports that the mysterious cleric had finally been cornered. One security official in the south-central Afghan city of Baghran said Omar had sped away on a motorcycle. Another official said he'd never been there at all.
NEWS
November 26, 2001 | From Reuters
Amid protests, Japanese naval vessels left for the Indian Ocean on Sunday to provide logistical support for the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan, this country's first military deployment in a combat situation since World War II. Three ships from the Maritime Self-Defense Force set sail under sunny skies from Yokosuka naval base just south of Tokyo and from Kure and Sasebo naval bases in southwestern Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2001 | DAVID FOLKENFLIK, BALTIMORE SUN
CBS has former Defense Secretary William S. Cohen, while NBC boasts former Army Gen. and anti-drug czar Barry McCaffrey. CNN relies on retired Air Force Gen. Don Shepperd and former NATO Supreme Allied Commander Wesley Clark. The list of notables goes on, news division by news division. In calmer times, these people are known as sources, the kind of informed observers who can shed light on noteworthy developments. During a crisis, they are transformed into paid consultants.
NEWS
November 20, 2001 | JOHN HENDREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pentagon strategists are mapping out a plan to hunt down Osama bin Laden and Taliban leaders in a manner that spares U.S. soldiers the perils of a cave-by-cave search, relying instead on American air power, opposition fighters and bounty hunters. Military planners said Monday that there is virtually no chance that they will risk exposing U.S. special operations forces to underground confrontations that could prove deadly, when new technologies and willing allies can do the job.
NEWS
November 18, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY and IVA DRAPALOVA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Czech anti-chemical warfare unit that gained recognition for its work during the Persian Gulf War is preparing to take part in the U.S.-led campaign against terrorism. Plans to deploy the unit, which specializes in the detection of nerve agents and the decontamination of troops and equipment, were announced this month by Czech Defense Minister Jaroslav Tvrdik.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2001 | GEOFFREY MOHAN and CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
While some Afghan immigrants cheered each snippet of news on Taliban retreats in their home country this weekend, others worried they were witnessing another prelude to civil war and a mad scramble for control among the nation's ethnic factions. In the Pamir Food Mart in Fremont, home to the state's largest Afghan community, patrons were exchanging congratulations over the fall of the northern city of Mazar-i-Sharif, a milestone most said was the beginning of the end of the Taliban regime.
NEWS
September 24, 2001 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having responded to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks with remarkable speed and unity, Congress now faces more divisive issues as it turns to the assaults' broader effects on the nation's psyche, economy and its legislative agenda.
NEWS
September 30, 2001 | From Associated Press
The resumption of the trial of eight foreign aid workers accused of preaching Christianity in Afghanistan has been put off until today, their lawyer said. Pakistani lawyer Atif Ali Khan, representing the eight, said senior government officials in Kabul notified him of the delay. He had met earlier Saturday with the aid workers--two Americans, two Australians and four Germans--and said they were ready for the resumption of their trial.
NEWS
November 10, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Friday continued an intense round of meetings with foreign leaders as he prepared to address the U.N. General Assembly today. After speaking by telephone with the president of Nicaragua, Bush met in the Oval Office separately with the foreign minister of Morocco, the prime ministers of India and the Czech Republic and the foreign minister of Saudi Arabia. The near-constant stream of foreign leaders to the White House since the Sept.
NEWS
November 3, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 6 million Afghan civilians, buffeted by drought and military campaigns, are in danger of starving or freezing to death this winter, two nongovernmental aid agencies said Friday. For hundreds of thousands of Afghans, the best hope for survival may be a massive U.S. airlift of food and other supplies, the agencies said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|