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United States Military Confrontations Haiti

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NEWS
June 15, 1994 | KENNETH FREED and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Most Clinton Administration officials have concluded that new economic sanctions imposed against this nation will not work--and only military intervention can drive Haiti's rulers from power, diplomats here and in Washington said Tuesday. Diplomats here said they expect President Clinton to give the sanctions several more weeks, and then, at the end of July, to decide on military intervention.
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NEWS
September 26, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A growing series of confrontations between U.S. troops and the Haitian military, including Saturday night's bloody engagement in which 10 Haitians were killed, are exposing the dangers and confusions of U.S. policy here, diplomats and military officials said Sunday. "It's what we were afraid of, Americans having to use more and more deadly force," one diplomat said, speaking of the Saturday incident in Cap Haitien. "It's going to be a nightmare."
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NEWS
December 10, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A majority of Americans consider the possible development of nuclear weapons by North Korea a serious threat, and more than half would support the use of force to eliminate it, according to a new Los Angeles Times Poll. But North Korea is the only major international trouble spot in which a majority would support such action, the poll found.
NEWS
June 24, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is coming under increasing fire for failing to marshal the U.S. intelligence community's vast resources to deal with the Haiti crisis, either as an alternative to military action or to soften the ground before American intervention. Critics ranging from congressional officials to the Administration's own foreign policy specialists are concerned the United States appears to be nearing intervention without first using intelligence mechanisms to undermine Lt. Gen.
NEWS
June 24, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is coming under increasing fire for failing to marshal the U.S. intelligence community's vast resources to deal with the Haiti crisis, either as an alternative to military action or to soften the ground before American intervention. Critics ranging from congressional officials to the Administration's own foreign policy specialists are concerned the United States appears to be nearing intervention without first using intelligence mechanisms to undermine Lt. Gen.
NEWS
September 26, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A growing series of confrontations between U.S. troops and the Haitian military, including Saturday night's bloody engagement in which 10 Haitians were killed, are exposing the dangers and confusions of U.S. policy here, diplomats and military officials said Sunday. "It's what we were afraid of, Americans having to use more and more deadly force," one diplomat said, speaking of the Saturday incident in Cap Haitien. "It's going to be a nightmare."
NEWS
June 15, 1994 | KENNETH FREED and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Most Clinton Administration officials have concluded that new economic sanctions imposed against this nation will not work--and only military intervention can drive Haiti's rulers from power, diplomats here and in Washington said Tuesday. Diplomats here said they expect President Clinton to give the sanctions several more weeks, and then, at the end of July, to decide on military intervention.
NEWS
December 10, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A majority of Americans consider the possible development of nuclear weapons by North Korea a serious threat, and more than half would support the use of force to eliminate it, according to a new Los Angeles Times Poll. But North Korea is the only major international trouble spot in which a majority would support such action, the poll found.
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