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United States Military Confrontations Iraq

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NEWS
March 17, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a day that began with a personal display of respect for Islam and ended at a palace, Vice President Dick Cheney delved into the thicket of Middle Eastern history and hatreds Saturday, conferring with Crown Prince Abdullah here about the Saudi's proposal to restrain the latest Israeli-Palestinian violence.
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NEWS
March 17, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a day that began with a personal display of respect for Islam and ended at a palace, Vice President Dick Cheney delved into the thicket of Middle Eastern history and hatreds Saturday, conferring with Crown Prince Abdullah here about the Saudi's proposal to restrain the latest Israeli-Palestinian violence.
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NEWS
November 9, 1996 | Associated Press
After taking a second look, the Pentagon concluded Friday that Iraqi antiaircraft batteries had turned their radars on U.S. warplanes last Saturday and Monday, justifying retaliatory missiles fired by the aircraft. A Pentagon statement said both F-16 pilots had indications on their control panels that Iraqi antiaircraft radar had "locked on" to the planes. The F-16s were flying patrol missions over southern Iraq as part of a long-standing operation blocking Iraqi flights.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. pilots have reacted with restraint to provocations in Iraq's "no-fly" zones, but the Clinton administration will come under intense pressure to respond more forcefully if Americans are downed or captured, experts say. In the four weeks since the Operation Desert Fox air bombardment, Iraq has confronted U.S. or British planes on eight occasions and sent aircraft into the Western-imposed no-fly zones about 80 times. U.S.
NEWS
August 16, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With no sign that Iraq is ready to open up its government ministries to weapons inspections by a U.N. team, President Bush and his national security adviser, Brent Scowcroft, have approved a plan for a new military confrontation with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein that would coincide with the Republican National Convention, the New York Times reported in its Sunday editions.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | ART PINE and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration said Wednesday that it will ask the U.N. Security Council to pass a new resolution that would permit military action against Iraq, if necessary, to stop Saddam Hussein's air attacks against Shiite Muslim villages in the south. Edward Perkins, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, told Congress that such a measure is needed because a previous U.N.
NEWS
April 1, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Poking at a raw nerve of the Bush Administration, Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) insisted Sunday that U.S. forces must shoot down Iraqi helicopters that have been ravaging the rebellious populations of that nation. Although praising President Bush's policy of nonintervention in the Iraqi civil wars as correct, Mitchell said: "I wish they would enforce the original policy of not permitting any aircraft, fixed-wing or helicopters, to operate against the rebels.
NEWS
November 16, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They had been only hours away from a devastating military bombardment, and many Iraqis awoke Sunday still wondering if the U.S. missiles and jet fighters gathering in the Persian Gulf would be unleashed against them. But by day's end, they had their answer. President Clinton confirmed in Washington that the United States would acknowledge the Iraqi government's promise to resume unconditional cooperation with U.N. weapons inspectors, thereby removing the immediate danger of a military attack.
NEWS
December 29, 1992 | Times Wire Services
TERRITORY: The zone below the 32nd Parallel is mainly marshlands around the Euphrates and Tigris rivers. The marshes cover about 6,000 square miles, the size of Hawaii. The region includes Basra, Iraq's second-largest city with 1.5 million people. UPRISING: Shiite Muslims, about 55% of Iraq's 17 million people, have been fighting in the south against Saddam Hussein's government since March, 1991. A rebellion after Iraq's Persian Gulf War defeat was crushed.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the aftermath of its latest confrontation with Iraq, the United States intends to press Saddam Hussein to supply a definitive paper trail to his weapons of mass destruction before the Islamic holiday of Ramadan in late December--or again face the prospect of U.S. military action. U.S.
NEWS
January 8, 1999 | From Reuters
A U.S. F-16 fighter jet opened fire at an antiaircraft missile site in northern Iraq on Thursday, apparently hitting the battery's radar in the latest military confrontation with Baghdad, the Pentagon said. "The radar stopped beaming at precisely the time the [missile] was to impact the radar, so we assume that it was a hit," Defense Department spokesman Kenneth Bacon told reporters Thursday. He said the battery targeted U.S. jets but did not fire. The F-16 and another U.S.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the aftermath of its latest confrontation with Iraq, the United States intends to press Saddam Hussein to supply a definitive paper trail to his weapons of mass destruction before the Islamic holiday of Ramadan in late December--or again face the prospect of U.S. military action. U.S.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With time running out before planned military strikes on Iraq, one U.N. official cooled his heels at the nation's Foreign Ministry, waiting for a statement signaling a break in the crisis. When it came, he phoned the U.N. chief here, who scribbled it sentence by sentence into a notebook. A third official tore off the pages, one by one, and handed them to a secretary, who typed them into a computer and printed out the result to be faxed to New York.
NEWS
November 16, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They had been only hours away from a devastating military bombardment, and many Iraqis awoke Sunday still wondering if the U.S. missiles and jet fighters gathering in the Persian Gulf would be unleashed against them. But by day's end, they had their answer. President Clinton confirmed in Washington that the United States would acknowledge the Iraqi government's promise to resume unconditional cooperation with U.N. weapons inspectors, thereby removing the immediate danger of a military attack.
NEWS
November 16, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After twice approaching the brink of massive bombing of Iraq, President Clinton early Sunday called off military action and accepted President Saddam Hussein's pledge to resume cooperation with U.N. weapons inspectors. Although administration officials said they are profoundly skeptical of Hussein's intentions, given Baghdad's record of repeatedly making and breaking such promises, the president decided to declare victory in this round. "Iraq has backed down," Clinton said.
NEWS
November 9, 1996 | Associated Press
After taking a second look, the Pentagon concluded Friday that Iraqi antiaircraft batteries had turned their radars on U.S. warplanes last Saturday and Monday, justifying retaliatory missiles fired by the aircraft. A Pentagon statement said both F-16 pilots had indications on their control panels that Iraqi antiaircraft radar had "locked on" to the planes. The F-16s were flying patrol missions over southern Iraq as part of a long-standing operation blocking Iraqi flights.
NEWS
November 3, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
A U.S. Air Force F-16 fighter plane fired a missile Saturday at an Iraqi radar site after the jet was locked on electronically while in the "no-fly" zone over southern Iraq, the Pentagon said. The F-16 returned safely to its base in Saudi Arabia, and it was not immediately known if the Iraqi site was damaged, Pentagon spokesman Capt. Bryan Salas said. The incident occurred about noon local time Saturday. An investigation was underway, the Pentagon said.
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The latest standoff between the United States and Iraq is the climax of a calculated military and political strategy by Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, according to several senior diplomats and Iraqi military planners in Baghdad. The Iraqi plan is to use a recently rebuilt antiaircraft missile system and a rejuvenated air force to confront Washington and its allies over the "no-fly zone" in southern Iraq.
NEWS
November 3, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
A U.S. Air Force F-16 fighter plane fired a missile Saturday at an Iraqi radar site after the jet was locked on electronically while in the "no-fly" zone over southern Iraq, the Pentagon said. The F-16 returned safely to its base in Saudi Arabia, and it was not immediately known if the Iraqi site was damaged, Pentagon spokesman Capt. Bryan Salas said. The incident occurred about noon local time Saturday. An investigation was underway, the Pentagon said.
NEWS
July 26, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Iraqi government Sunday flatly denied a Pentagon report that it had exchanged missile fire with U.S. warplanes over southern Iraq, suggesting the report was based on an American pilot's "hallucinations" or a deliberate Clinton Administration attempt to rekindle anti-Iraq sentiment. U.S. military officials say Iraq launched a surface-to-air missile at an American fighter jet late Saturday after it destroyed an Iraqi antiaircraft battery that had targeted the jet with radar.
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