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United States Military Confrontations Japan

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NEWS
December 3, 1991
The Japanese Striking Force The Japanese carrier striking task force that attacked Pearl Harbor set sail from the Kuril Islands on Nov. 26. It was made up of six aircraft carriers, two battleships and had a support force of nine destroyers, one light cruiser, two heavy cruisers and eight tankers. Three I-class submarines were positioned in front of the task force to act as scouts. U.S. Ships That Missed the Attack Many ships of the U.S. fleet were not present at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.
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NEWS
December 3, 1991 | TIMES SPECIAL CORRESPONDENTS
Views of the Japan-America relationship, past and present: "When I was a high school student, I saw a (Japanese public television) program and learned about (Pearl Harbor) in detail. When I learned the detailed background, I felt Japan was easily tricked by America. . . . "I think Japan changed a lot (after the war). I can't say it has changed in every respect, but there are things that are completely different. If I have to sum it up in one word, Japan became peaceful. . . .
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NEWS
December 3, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The diminutive military commander who devised the operational plan for the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor would many years later win a U.S. decoration for his contributions to American security. But he never apologized for his World War II role and contended that the only problem with the Pearl Harbor raid was that Japan failed to follow it up aggressively enough. Proud and ramrod-straight at 5 feet 3 inches and 103 pounds, sharp-featured Minoru Genda remained devoted to his career to the end.
NEWS
December 3, 1991
Responsibility for the all-out, U.S. government-sponsored research effort that produced the first atomic bomb was assigned Aug. 13, 1942, to the Manhattan Engineer District of the Army Corps of Engineers. And from then on, the entire effort was known as the Manhattan Project. By Dec. 2, 1942, a laboratory at the University of Chicago, under Enrico Fermi's direction, initiated the first self-sustaining chain reaction using an experimental uranium and graphite atomic pile.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | TIMES SPECIAL CORRESPONDENTS
Views of the Japan-America relationship, past and present: "When I was a high school student, I saw a (Japanese public television) program and learned about (Pearl Harbor) in detail. When I learned the detailed background, I felt Japan was easily tricked by America. . . . "I think Japan changed a lot (after the war). I can't say it has changed in every respect, but there are things that are completely different. If I have to sum it up in one word, Japan became peaceful. . . .
NEWS
December 3, 1991
Responsibility for the all-out, U.S. government-sponsored research effort that produced the first atomic bomb was assigned Aug. 13, 1942, to the Manhattan Engineer District of the Army Corps of Engineers. And from then on, the entire effort was known as the Manhattan Project. By Dec. 2, 1942, a laboratory at the University of Chicago, under Enrico Fermi's direction, initiated the first self-sustaining chain reaction using an experimental uranium and graphite atomic pile.
NEWS
December 3, 1991
Certainly the planes were American. As they dived and banked to the right, a shipmate said: "Let's go over to the port side and watch them drop the dummy torpedoes on us." Richard Fiske, 19, a Marine on the battleship West Virginia, crossed the deck and saw at least four aircraft fly straight at the battleships. "Now," his shipmate said, "we're going to hear a thud." It turned out to be, Fiske says, "one hellacious thud." A wall of black water rose in the harbor, then slammed down over his ship.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"If I went to the United States and was asked why Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, it would be useless. I couldn't answer. I don't know," said Hidenori Suzuki, 20, a freshman at Waseda University. Suzuki blames Japanese education. But educational instruction is only part of the picture. Fifty years after the Pearl Harbor attack on Dec. 7, 1941, this country has still not come to grips with its past.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | SAM JAMESON and SANDY BANKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In studying Pearl Harbor and World War II, students in Japan and the United States have one thing in common, according to experts in both countries: They learn very little. Most American history courses devote little attention to 20th-Century history, said Esther Taira, Los Angeles Unified School District curriculum specialist.
NEWS
December 3, 1991
Certainly the planes were American. As they dived and banked to the right, a shipmate said: "Let's go over to the port side and watch them drop the dummy torpedoes on us." Richard Fiske, 19, a Marine on the battleship West Virginia, crossed the deck and saw at least four aircraft fly straight at the battleships. "Now," his shipmate said, "we're going to hear a thud." It turned out to be, Fiske says, "one hellacious thud." A wall of black water rose in the harbor, then slammed down over his ship.
NEWS
December 3, 1991
The Japanese Striking Force The Japanese carrier striking task force that attacked Pearl Harbor set sail from the Kuril Islands on Nov. 26. It was made up of six aircraft carriers, two battleships and had a support force of nine destroyers, one light cruiser, two heavy cruisers and eight tankers. Three I-class submarines were positioned in front of the task force to act as scouts. U.S. Ships That Missed the Attack Many ships of the U.S. fleet were not present at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The diminutive military commander who devised the operational plan for the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor would many years later win a U.S. decoration for his contributions to American security. But he never apologized for his World War II role and contended that the only problem with the Pearl Harbor raid was that Japan failed to follow it up aggressively enough. Proud and ramrod-straight at 5 feet 3 inches and 103 pounds, sharp-featured Minoru Genda remained devoted to his career to the end.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"If I went to the United States and was asked why Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, it would be useless. I couldn't answer. I don't know," said Hidenori Suzuki, 20, a freshman at Waseda University. Suzuki blames Japanese education. But educational instruction is only part of the picture. Fifty years after the Pearl Harbor attack on Dec. 7, 1941, this country has still not come to grips with its past.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | SAM JAMESON and SANDY BANKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In studying Pearl Harbor and World War II, students in Japan and the United States have one thing in common, according to experts in both countries: They learn very little. Most American history courses devote little attention to 20th-Century history, said Esther Taira, Los Angeles Unified School District curriculum specialist.
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