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October 20, 1991 | Dan Kurzman, Kurzman, author of the current "Fatal Voyage: The Sinking of the USS Indianapolis," is working on a book about the loss of the U.S.S. Juneau and the five Sullivan brothers in World War II
Since the birth of this nation more than 200 years ago, the U.S. Navy has been fighting, almost without pause, a bitter two-phased battle--against the enemy at sea and against the government at home. For usually when the bloodshed has ended, the call for "peace dividends" has rung out--and the money earmarked for peaceful purposes has been siphoned first from the Navy budget. Who needed a large, expensive Navy if the danger was past and the boys were coming home?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
January 15, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
Naval Station Norfolk in Virginia is preparing for a memorial service on Friday after the recovery of the body of a pilot missing in a helicopter crash. Navy officials said the body of Lt. Sean Christopher Snyder, 39, of Santee, Calif., was recovered on Tuesday after searchers located the cockpit of the downed helicopter. Snyder and two other members of the helicopter crew died in the training mission. A crew of five was on board the MH-53E Sea Dragon when it crashed Jan. 8 in the Atlantic Ocean about 18 miles off the coast of Virginia Beach, according to the Navy.
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SPORTS
July 19, 1986
A strong case for random urinalysis testing of professional and college athletes has been made since the deaths of Len Bias and Don Rogers. However, many people are against testing because they think it strips people of their rights. As an enlisted man in the United States Navy, I am subject to random urinalysis tests, and when asked to submit to tests, I have no feelings of betrayal or loss of rights. I do sleep much better knowing that co-workers I depend on do not use drugs.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2013 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - A flood of misconduct cases involving generals and admirals has created deep concern at the Pentagon about ethical and moral shortcomings among senior military officers and prompted new steps to tighten rules, increase inspections and weed out offenders, officials said. The most recent cases - a Navy admiral under investigation for using counterfeit gambling chips and an Air Force general in charge of nuclear-tipped missiles relieved for drunkenness off duty - follow a long list of officer wrongdoing over the last year.
SPORTS
August 15, 1987
So poor Ens. Napoleon McCallum feels the United States Navy has treated him very unfairly. After collecting every last penny of the cost of the expensive education this young man has obtained at taxpayers' expense, the Navy should accept his resignation. Our country needs officers with integrity and commitment. It is too bad this young man filled someone else's spot at the Naval Academy in the first place. Raiders, you can have him. JACKIE COLLERAN Thousand Oaks
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1988
In response to the Marine Corps dropping general court-martial charges against a Navy dentist for fraternizing with an enlisted Marine who later became her husband (Part I, May 24, 26): Does this mean Navy Lt. Kathleen Mazure, the media and the American Civil Liberties Union have won a victory for justice? This would depend on the eye of the beholder. And whether we want to think of Kathleen Mazure first as a "bride" in love, or as a sworn commissioned officer of the United States Navy, with all the rights, privileges and responsibilities that her oath and commission place on her. Ever since the Reagan Administration has been in power there has been a marked and steady increase in the favorable image the public has towards the military.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1988
My sympathies go out to Navy Lt. Kathleen Mazure, the officer who has run afoul of the Navy's medieval class and caste system by having sexual relations with and later marrying, egad, a lowly enlisted man of, say again?, the Marine Corps ("She Marries a Corporal--Now Faces Court-Martial," Part I, May 13). When the Navy was founded in 1775 at the outset of the Revolutionary War, it adopted almost intact the customs and traditions of its enemy, the aristocratic British Royal Navy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1989
This letter is in response to the one written by Joe Galliani of Long Beach (May 23) regarding his diatribe against the United States Navy. While I can accept skepticism about our public affairs policies from someone obviously not familiar with the system, I cannot accept being called "fat, arrogant, impotent and clueless." I joined the Navy five years ago to serve my country and to try to improve my experience and education level. I have done so, but the price has been a taxable income of $12,000 last year.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
Naval Station Norfolk in Virginia is preparing for a memorial service on Friday after the recovery of the body of a pilot missing in a helicopter crash. Navy officials said the body of Lt. Sean Christopher Snyder, 39, of Santee, Calif., was recovered on Tuesday after searchers located the cockpit of the downed helicopter. Snyder and two other members of the helicopter crew died in the training mission. A crew of five was on board the MH-53E Sea Dragon when it crashed Jan. 8 in the Atlantic Ocean about 18 miles off the coast of Virginia Beach, according to the Navy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- Two defense contractors have been sentenced to three years in prison for their part in a fraud and bribery scheme involving phony payments for the repair of military aircraft at North Island Naval Air Station in Coronado. Robert Ehnow and Joanne Loehr, owners of Poway-based companies, were convicted in San Diego federal court of showering Navy officials with gifts and cash in exchange for millions of dollars in payments for work supposedly done on planes at the Fleet Readiness Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- Two defense contractors have been sentenced to three years in prison for their part in a fraud and bribery scheme involving phony payments for the repair of military aircraft at North Island Naval Air Station in Coronado. Robert Ehnow and Joanne Loehr, owners of Poway-based companies, were convicted in San Diego federal court of showering Navy officials with gifts and cash in exchange for millions of dollars in payments for work supposedly done on planes at the Fleet Readiness Center.
WORLD
February 3, 2006 | From Associated Press
President Hugo Chavez said Thursday that Venezuela was expelling a U.S. Navy officer accused of passing secret information from the Venezuelan military to the Pentagon. He also accused Navy Cmdr. John Correa of encouraging Venezuelan officers to consider overthrowing the government, which weathered a brief coup in April 2002. Chavez warned that he would throw out all U.S. military attaches if further suspected espionage occurred. The U.S.
BOOKS
October 20, 1991 | Dan Kurzman, Kurzman, author of the current "Fatal Voyage: The Sinking of the USS Indianapolis," is working on a book about the loss of the U.S.S. Juneau and the five Sullivan brothers in World War II
Since the birth of this nation more than 200 years ago, the U.S. Navy has been fighting, almost without pause, a bitter two-phased battle--against the enemy at sea and against the government at home. For usually when the bloodshed has ended, the call for "peace dividends" has rung out--and the money earmarked for peaceful purposes has been siphoned first from the Navy budget. Who needed a large, expensive Navy if the danger was past and the boys were coming home?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1989
This letter is in response to the one written by Joe Galliani of Long Beach (May 23) regarding his diatribe against the United States Navy. While I can accept skepticism about our public affairs policies from someone obviously not familiar with the system, I cannot accept being called "fat, arrogant, impotent and clueless." I joined the Navy five years ago to serve my country and to try to improve my experience and education level. I have done so, but the price has been a taxable income of $12,000 last year.
SPORTS
May 11, 1989 | BRIAN HEWITT, Times Staff Writer
Early this spring, Lt. (j.g.) Napoleon McCallum was the only person confident enough to publicly predict that the United States Navy would allow him to play professional football for the Chargers in 1989. The Chargers, fearful of alienating the Navy, insisted they were not involved in McCallum's attempts to secure a transfer to the San Diego Naval recruiting office, where he could also play running back for the Chargers in his spare time. The Navy, fearful of a creating a public perception that they would allow a prominent athlete to dictate policy, answered most inquiries with stony silence.
NEWS
April 22, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Rifle shots were fired 21 times; the Navy bugler played taps, and a wreath of 47 yellow carnations was cast into the Elizabeth River on Friday in memory of the 47 men who were killed in the explosion aboard the battleship Iowa. There were few dry eyes among the more than 750 people who gathered on the waterfront with Gov. Gerald L. Baliles and representatives from the eight cities in the Hampton Roads area. "With this ceremony, we wish to touch hands with our Navy friends and share as best we can their very deep anguish and grief," Norfolk City Manager James B. Oliver Jr. said to start the brief ceremony, which was organized by the city.
WORLD
February 3, 2006 | From Associated Press
President Hugo Chavez said Thursday that Venezuela was expelling a U.S. Navy officer accused of passing secret information from the Venezuelan military to the Pentagon. He also accused Navy Cmdr. John Correa of encouraging Venezuelan officers to consider overthrowing the government, which weathered a brief coup in April 2002. Chavez warned that he would throw out all U.S. military attaches if further suspected espionage occurred. The U.S.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2013 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - A flood of misconduct cases involving generals and admirals has created deep concern at the Pentagon about ethical and moral shortcomings among senior military officers and prompted new steps to tighten rules, increase inspections and weed out offenders, officials said. The most recent cases - a Navy admiral under investigation for using counterfeit gambling chips and an Air Force general in charge of nuclear-tipped missiles relieved for drunkenness off duty - follow a long list of officer wrongdoing over the last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1989
Is the United States Navy to be our first line of defense, or our unfairly self-serving competitor against private enterprise? The Navy announces plans to spend likely $200 million to develop a "complex of hotels and high-rise offices" on its most prime San Diego waterfront land. The Navy wants to make itself money on former city land that it got cheap many years ago, while unfairly undercutting private hotel and office owners. The Navy implies that it will give a "face lift" to our waterfront.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1988
In response to the Marine Corps dropping general court-martial charges against a Navy dentist for fraternizing with an enlisted Marine who later became her husband (Part I, May 24, 26): Does this mean Navy Lt. Kathleen Mazure, the media and the American Civil Liberties Union have won a victory for justice? This would depend on the eye of the beholder. And whether we want to think of Kathleen Mazure first as a "bride" in love, or as a sworn commissioned officer of the United States Navy, with all the rights, privileges and responsibilities that her oath and commission place on her. Ever since the Reagan Administration has been in power there has been a marked and steady increase in the favorable image the public has towards the military.
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