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United States Nuclear Weapons

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NEWS
January 30, 1992 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new U.S. and Russian arms initiatives represent a breathtaking acceleration of efforts to curb nuclear weapons but contain significant differences that will require hard bargaining despite the warming post-Cold War climate. Most important, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin did not agree to the key condition in President Bush's initiative: eliminating multiple warheads from land-based missiles. He didn't even use the words, or their rough acronym, MIRV, in his speech.
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NEWS
January 30, 1992 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new U.S. and Russian arms initiatives represent a breathtaking acceleration of efforts to curb nuclear weapons but contain significant differences that will require hard bargaining despite the warming post-Cold War climate. Most important, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin did not agree to the key condition in President Bush's initiative: eliminating multiple warheads from land-based missiles. He didn't even use the words, or their rough acronym, MIRV, in his speech.
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NEWS
June 2, 1988 | Associated Press
The third United States nuclear weapons test in less than three weeks rocked the Nevada desert today and registered distinctly on seismic equipment atop hotels and casinos here, 110 miles from ground zero. The test was conducted within hours of the close of the Moscow summit, where the Soviet Union and the United States formally agreed to monitor each other's tests this summer in joint verification experiments.
NEWS
March 18, 1988
China is selling Saudi Arabia intermediate-range missiles capable of reaching any part of the Middle East with a nuclear warhead, although both countries have assured the United States that nuclear weapons are not involved, the State Department said. The missiles are Chinese CSS2-class surface-to-surface missiles that in their most advanced form have a range of about 2,200 miles, sources said.
SPORTS
February 15, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
A rock station disc jockey who two weeks ago broadcast a fake report of a nuclear attack is out as the St. Louis Cardinals public address announcer. John Ulett said he was told he will not be retained for the 1991 season, ending an eight-year stint with the Cardinals. Ulett, who works for FM radio station KSHE, broadcast a fake report Jan. 29 that the United States was under nuclear attack.
NEWS
January 30, 1987
Physicist Yuri Orlov, recently allowed to emigrate from the Soviet Union, urged Americans to continue protesting the nuclear arms race, saying their voices are heard in the Kremlin. "The American left understands the Soviet system better than the right," Orlov, 62, said through an interpreter at a joint meeting of the American Physical Society and the American Assn. of Physics Teachers in San Francisco.
NEWS
August 30, 1999 | MARIA L. La GANGA and JOCELYN STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
This is a story about open secrets and closed mouths, about a man with a double life and the singular city that has sheltered him. Gordon Getty, an heir to the Getty Oil fortune and an international patron of the arts, has acknowledged that he has two families: wife Ann and four grown sons here, and three young daughters living quietly in the Los Angeles area with their mother, Cynthia Beck. Quietly, that is, until now.
NEWS
September 5, 2000 | From Associated Press
The judge who tried to release fired nuclear scientist Wen Ho Lee from jail on $1-million bail said the government failed to present convincing arguments for keeping him behind bars until he is tried. Wen Ho Lee was to have been released Friday from the Santa Fe County jail, where he has been kept since December in solitary confinement. But an appeals court halted his release at the last minute while it considered an appeal from the government. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1993
It is reassuring that 51% of Americans feel so strongly about nuclear weapons that they would support the use of force against North Korea to eliminate them (Dec. 10). Your poll has left some obvious questions unasked, however. For instance, how many Americans would support the use of force by North Korea to rid the United States of nuclear weapons? Or, how many Americans find it odd that the world's largest holder and continuing producer of nuclear weapons is telling other people that they can't have them?
NEWS
January 23, 1987 | Associated Press
A political foe of Corazon Aquino today released the text of a wiretapped telephone call between the president and her advisers which he said showed the government tried to influence an independent constitution-drafting commission into taking a pro-U.S. stand. The paper also contained a tacit admission by Executive Secretary Joker Arroyo and Aquino that the United States maintains nuclear weapons in the Philippines.
OPINION
July 19, 2005 | Rajan Menon, Rajan Menon, professor of international relations at Lehigh University, is a fellow at the New American Foundation.
The bush foreign policy squad hasn't had much to cheer about lately. The Iraqi insurgency won't die. Iran is suspected of seeking nuclear weapons. North Korea already appears to have acquired a small stash. But as the president met with Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Monday, the White House could take heart from what's happening in South Asia. For starters, nuclear weapons have promoted peace in that volatile region, it turns out.
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