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United States Olympic Committee

SPORTS
June 17, 1990 | KIM Q. BERKSHIRE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five years of debate and delays, the United States Olympic Committee has adopted a master plan that will bring renovation and expansion of the USOC's existing training centers in Colorado Springs, Colo., and Lake Placid, N.Y. During Saturday's first meeting of the USOC's new board of directors at the Omni Hotel, the 100-member board voted on the three key issues that had promised to stir the most controversy.
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SPORTS
February 11, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Prince Alexander de Merode of Belgium, chairman of the International Olympic Committee's drug commission, criticized the United States Olympic Committee Wednesday for not dismissing an official who was involved in a violation of IOC doping rules. "Officials involved in doping should no longer be allowed to work for an Olympic committee," de Merode said. "It really is quite unacceptable."
SPORTS
September 27, 1987 | MIKE RABUN, United Press International
Of all the records set during the Los Angeles Olympics, the one that most pleased the win-hungry American sporting public came in the music category. -- Most times one national anthem played: Star Spangled Banner, 83. With the absence of the Soviet Union and East Germany from the 1984 Olympics, the home-country heroes were able to dominate as no other nation has before.
SPORTS
October 16, 1987 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Saying that he expected to take heat for his remarks, Dr. Robert Voy, the United States Olympic Committee's chief medical officer, said Thursday that he is dubious about results of drug tests at last summer's U.S. and World Track and Field Championships. Voy emphasized that he has no evidence that positive drug tests were suppressed at either meet.
SPORTS
September 11, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Baaron Pittenger, secretary general of the United States Olympic Committee, said Saturday the urine samples that apparently revealed the use of a banned substance by swimmer Angel Myers may be sent to another laboratory for confirmation. But Pittenger said he believes the initial test, conducted by Dr. Don Catlin at the UCLA analytical laboratory, was accurate. Myers qualified for the U.S. Olympic team in five events during the U.S. trials last month at Austin, Tex.
SPORTS
October 25, 1987 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Harvey Schiller, Southeastern Conference commissioner, was elected executive director of the United States Olympic Committee Saturday without dissent by an 85-member executive board. Schiller, 48, will assume the $150,000-a-year position on Jan. 1. His contract expires in February 1989, but USOC President Robert Helmick said he is virtually certain it will be extended through 1992.
NEWS
February 13, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After initially taking a hard line on the question of whether figure skater Tonya Harding should compete in the Winter Olympics, the U.S. Olympic Committee decided here early this morning to switch rather than fight and allow her to skate. In an announcement that came shortly after 1 a.m. here, barely 12 hours into the XVII Olympic Winter Games, the USOC said that it had reached an agreement with Harding's attorneys for her to participate in the competition, which begins Feb.
NEWS
January 28, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR and RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tears welling in her eyes and her lips quivering, Tonya Harding confessed Thursday that she knew about the plot to attack rival Nancy Kerrigan after the fact and did not report it to police. But Harding steadfastly said she was not involved and knew nothing of the assault beforehand. She pleaded, all but begged to remain on the U.S. Olympic team. "I have devoted my entire life to one objective: winning an Olympic gold medal for my country. This is my last chance.
SPORTS
December 3, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beset by management turmoil, budget concerns and allegations that it ignores drug use by athletes even as it prepares for what will probably be the last Olympic Games in the United States for at least a decade, the U.S. Olympic Committee convenes today to pick a new leader. In an increasingly close race, current vice chairs Sandy Baldwin and Paul George are vying to become the USOC chairperson, succeeding Bill Hybl. The stakes are significant.
SPORTS
May 27, 2006 | Bill Dwyre
Remember Peter Ueberroth, the man who pulled the Olympic movement up by its bootstraps in 1984 by organizing a Los Angeles Olympics that had us all beaming like members of the chamber of commerce? Well, he is back in the middle of the Olympic movement, still pulling on bootstraps. Ueberroth, 68 now, is chief executive of the United States Olympic Committee and is in the catbird seat for much of the decision-making that could set the course for the Games of 2016.
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