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United States Olympic Committee

SPORTS
October 16, 1987 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Saying that he expected to take heat for his remarks, Dr. Robert Voy, the United States Olympic Committee's chief medical officer, said Thursday that he is dubious about results of drug tests at last summer's U.S. and World Track and Field Championships. Voy emphasized that he has no evidence that positive drug tests were suppressed at either meet.
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SPORTS
September 11, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Baaron Pittenger, secretary general of the United States Olympic Committee, said Saturday the urine samples that apparently revealed the use of a banned substance by swimmer Angel Myers may be sent to another laboratory for confirmation. But Pittenger said he believes the initial test, conducted by Dr. Don Catlin at the UCLA analytical laboratory, was accurate. Myers qualified for the U.S. Olympic team in five events during the U.S. trials last month at Austin, Tex.
NEWS
February 13, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After initially taking a hard line on the question of whether figure skater Tonya Harding should compete in the Winter Olympics, the U.S. Olympic Committee decided here early this morning to switch rather than fight and allow her to skate. In an announcement that came shortly after 1 a.m. here, barely 12 hours into the XVII Olympic Winter Games, the USOC said that it had reached an agreement with Harding's attorneys for her to participate in the competition, which begins Feb.
NEWS
January 28, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR and RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tears welling in her eyes and her lips quivering, Tonya Harding confessed Thursday that she knew about the plot to attack rival Nancy Kerrigan after the fact and did not report it to police. But Harding steadfastly said she was not involved and knew nothing of the assault beforehand. She pleaded, all but begged to remain on the U.S. Olympic team. "I have devoted my entire life to one objective: winning an Olympic gold medal for my country. This is my last chance.
SPORTS
December 3, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beset by management turmoil, budget concerns and allegations that it ignores drug use by athletes even as it prepares for what will probably be the last Olympic Games in the United States for at least a decade, the U.S. Olympic Committee convenes today to pick a new leader. In an increasingly close race, current vice chairs Sandy Baldwin and Paul George are vying to become the USOC chairperson, succeeding Bill Hybl. The stakes are significant.
SPORTS
May 27, 2006 | Bill Dwyre
Remember Peter Ueberroth, the man who pulled the Olympic movement up by its bootstraps in 1984 by organizing a Los Angeles Olympics that had us all beaming like members of the chamber of commerce? Well, he is back in the middle of the Olympic movement, still pulling on bootstraps. Ueberroth, 68 now, is chief executive of the United States Olympic Committee and is in the catbird seat for much of the decision-making that could set the course for the Games of 2016.
SPORTS
March 11, 1989 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
Five years of fighting the epidemic of drugs in sport and the often more vicious political battles with sports administrators took their toll on Dr. Robert Voy. The United States Olympic Committee's chief medical officer announced his resignation earlier this week, saying his back was to the wall. Voy's resignation was not unexpected, given the mounting tension between him and USOC leadership.
SPORTS
November 25, 1991 | From Associated Press
As president of the United States Olympic Committee, Robert Helmick repeatedly violated rules regarding ethical conduct by Olympic officials, according to a report released Sunday. "The report concludes that Mr. Helmick's behavior, among other things, gave rise to conflicts of interest and the appearance of conflicts of interest and engendered a general perception that Mr. Helmick was trafficking on his Olympic position to the benefit of private clients," said Arnold Burns, a former U.S.
SPORTS
February 12, 1990 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
Symbolic of the man himself, the era of George Steinbrenner in the United States Olympic Committee came on here Sunday like a runaway freight train. The USOC House of Delegates' annual meeting this weekend was expected to be a Steinbrenner dog and pony show that would, after a year of review, pass legislation recommended by Steinbrenner's Overview Commission and geared to "streamline the organization" and make it more businesslike. Which is exactly what happened.
SPORTS
November 14, 1999 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States Olympic Committee directed more than $60,000 to support sports in Africa and Asia in hopes of currying favor for Salt Lake City's bid for the 2002 Winter Olympics, according to an internal USOC report obtained Saturday by The Times. The report, which reveals publicly for the first time just how far the USOC went in helping Salt Lake win the 2002 Games, says the USOC underwrote training costs and supplies for athletes and coaches from Sudan, Mali, Uganda and Turkey.
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