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June 16, 1992 | JOHN WEYLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Perry Parker got his first taste of big-time golf this winter as he strode up the 18th fairway of the Palm Meadows Country Club in Surfers' Paradise, Australia, alongside hometown favorite Ian Baker-Finch. He found it to be quite palatable. Thousands of spectators lined the fairway or sat in the tiered grandstand bowl surrounding the 18th green for the final day of the $1.4-million Palm Meadows Cup, Australia's richest tournament. An ovation erupted at the first glimpse of Baker-Finch.
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June 13, 2012 | BILL DWYRE
Toss away your mental images of Rory McIlroy. Wipe the slate clean. When he takes his first swing here Thursday in the opening round of the U.S. Open golf tournament at the Hills of Horror, a.k.a. the Olympic Club, he will no longer be the kid. The fresh-faced youth, the new young star, the boy among men, is gone. Deal with it. No fair wanting to volunteer to pick him up after Little League practice, or bake him chocolate chip cookies. Stop worrying about whether he brought enough clean underwear or is staying out too late with all those older Irish guys, who tend to get very comfortable in the pubs.
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SPORTS
June 16, 2003 | THOMAS BONK
When he was a kid in Pennsylvania, Jim Furyk would bug his father all the time about wanting to try golf. Mike Furyk kept telling his son that he wasn't old enough. Mike Furyk had been a club pro, spending the usual long hours to get the job done. He worked on weekends and holidays and felt bad because he couldn't take his family on vacations, as most everyone else could. Mike knew something had to change.
SPORTS
June 19, 2010 | Teddy Greenstein
Birdie: Ryo Ishikawa: The Japanese teenager with the huge media following is two shots back after shooting 70-71 at Pebble Beach. "I've played with him in Japan and it's even worse over there," Rory McIlroy, who played with Ishikawa the first two days, says of the reporters who track Ishikawa. ("He handles it very, very well. That's probably the most impressive thing about him — apart from how he plays golf." Bogey: Aaron Baddeley: He hasn't been the same player since leading the 2008 Open at Oakmont after Saturday (and making triple bogey to start Sunday's round)
SPORTS
June 19, 1989 | JIM MURRAY
It wasn't a tournament, it was a Death March. About half the field of guys playing out the 89th U.S. Open came down the last 18 holes like guys going to the electric chair. Curtis Strange didn't win it, he inherited it. Tom Kite left it to him in his will, so to speak. It was the coldest, slowest, wettest Open in the recent history of the USGA. But not the dullest. Oak Hill, familiarly known to the wet-shoe set in the press tent this week as "Soak Hill," gave as good as it got from the world's finest golfers.
SPORTS
June 21, 1992 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks ago, PGA pro Scott Verplank had a dream. A weird dream. A dream that featured his golfing buddy Andy Dillard, a 30-year-old journeyman who lost his Tour card in 1988 and does things like bet folks $100 he can swim across a lake in 35 seconds (he can't). The dream went like this: Dillard would qualify for the U.S. Open at Pebble Beach, finish in the top 15 and by doing so, earn an invitation to the coveted Masters tournament.
SPORTS
June 24, 1990 | JIM MURRAY
It's the oldest cliche on Broadway. The understudy gets pushed onstage by the director who cries, "You're going out there a nobody--and you're coming back a star!" It doesn't happen much outside a Warner Bros. musical. In real life, you get to be a star the old-fashioned way. You earn it. But Busby Berkeley would have loved the story of Michael William Donald. Real lump-in-the-throat, there's-no-business-like-show-business stuff.
SPORTS
June 17, 1990 | MAL FLORENCE
Britain's Nick Faldo pointed his putter in mock anger Saturday on the 17th green at a group picketing the U.S. Open just outside a fence at the Medinah Country Club. Faldo seemed annoyed by the noise the picketers were making but made his putt. Representative of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union are protesting the USGA's sale of merchandise manufactured by LaMode du Golf, which manufactures golf shirts and other items.
SPORTS
June 18, 1991 | MAL FLORENCE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Scott Simpson ever plays at Hazeltine National Golf Club again, he should make a wide detour around the 16th hole. For the third consecutive day, he had a two-shot lead over Payne Stewart as he approached No. 16. And once again, the 16th, a treacherous par four measuring 384 yards, tormented Simpson on Monday. He bogeyed the hole, and Stewart got his first birdie in 31 holes for a two-shot swing. Simpson, usually steady, bogeyed the next two holes, virtually forfeiting the 91st U.S.
SPORTS
June 19, 1992 | JIM MURRAY
Every year it's the same. You walk into the press room during the opening round of the U.S. Open and there on the leader board are the mystery guests. It sets off a press scramble to find out who in the world they are and where they came from. At Winged Foot in '84, it was Mike Donald who opened with a 68. In 1950, it was Lee Mackey's famous 64 at Merion. T.C. Chen's 65 led at Oakland Hills in 1985.
SPORTS
June 17, 2010 | Chris Dufresne
Reporting from Pebble Beach — It has been 10 years since the U.S. Open Championship last touched shore at storied Pebble Beach, and it would be understatement to say a lot has changed since Tiger Woods won here, incredibly, by 15 shots. The rest of the golfing world left Pebble in rubble a decade ago, wondering if they had maybe entered the wrong profession. Ernie Els and Miguel Angel Jimenez tied for second at three-over par -- it felt like a tie for 52nd. "The only thing that can stop Tiger from winning is Tiger," one golfer said.
SPORTS
June 18, 2009 | Teddy Greenstein
Who says the USGA enjoys torturing the world's greatest players? The 156 men who tee it up today at the 109th U.S. Open will play a course that, compared with 2002, has wider fairways, slower greens and rough that's both wispier and shorter near the fairways. But there's a catch: Beth- page Black will play 224 yards longer than it did in '02.
SPORTS
June 18, 2009 | Teddy Greenstein
Tiger and Phil. Phil and Tiger. They will command our attention, but they won't be the only ones. Here are five more to watch from the U.S. Open's 156-player field: Kenny Perry A bogey-bogey finish in regulation cost him the Masters, but Perry says he felt like a champion after receiving 800 sympathy cards and letters of inspiration. The patriotic Perry built a public golf course in Franklin, Ky., and chose a Ryder Cup run over the British Open last year, so a U.S.
SPORTS
June 17, 2008 | Thomas Bonk
LA JOLLA -- After five days and 91 holes of golf, just after he cuddled his toddler daughter, and moments after he raised the U.S. Open trophy for the third time, Tiger Woods said he didn't feel like playing golf anymore. "I'm glad I'm done," he said. "I'm done." Of course, there are vastly different levels of not playing anymore, such as this one: He has had quite enough of the 108th U.S. Open, thank you very much.
SPORTS
June 16, 2008 | Thomas Bonk
LA JOLLA -- There are all kinds of playoffs in golf. Some happen in sudden death. You beat the other player on the first extra hole, and it's over. That's what you see at the Masters. Ask Greg Norman and Larry Mize. If there is a playoff at the British Open and the PGA Championship, the best score after you play four holes wins. Seems reasonable, four holes are a lot. Then there is the U.S. Open, where a playoff takes on a life of its own.
SPORTS
June 16, 2008 | Chris Dufresne, Times Staff Writer
LA JOLLA -- He did it again, almost on command, as Rocco Mediate's heart, and the sun, sank. Tiger Woods, who before the 108th U.S. Open had not walked 18 holes since left knee surgery on April 15, is going to walk at least 18 more. He's going from a long layoff to a long playoff. "I was planning on going to Mexico," Woods said when asked where he was originally headed today. Not now. Woods slithered a 12-foot birdie putt into the right side of the cup at No.
SPORTS
November 26, 1992 | JIM MURRAY
When Tom Kite won the U.S. Open last summer, the golf establishment didn't know whether to throw its hat in the air or just sigh with relief. There are certain things you like to see happen. You like to see Willie Mays win a batting title, Ted Williams win a triple crown, Bill Shoemaker win a Derby, Walter Johnson win a World Series game, an Unser win Indy. Guys who have paid their dues. Guys who have never needed to rely on luck--unless it's bad.
SPORTS
June 9, 1998 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let's see, San Francisco has its cable cars and now it has its . . . golf cart? Casey Martin rode his cart straight into U.S. Open history Monday, all the way from Ohio, when he birdied the second extra hole in a five-way playoff and qualified for the upcoming Open at the Olympic Club, just a short drive, either car or cart, from San Francisco. "I'm stunned," said Martin, who double-bogeyed the 36th hole to fall into a playoff. "I kind of wrote the whole thing off when I finished.
SPORTS
June 16, 2008 | Thomas Bonk
Hit: John Merrick, 26, the former UCLA star, not only shot his second consecutive round of 71, he wound up tied for sixth and earned the right to play in the 2009 U.S. Open at Bethpage Black. The top 15 finishers at Torrey Pines made it. Miss: Ernie Els, above, was just two over and solidly in the hunt when he reached the 478-yard 15th, where he promptly made a triple bogey and dropped like a rock. Els finished with a 73 and tied for 14th. -- Thomas Bonk
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