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United States Open Golf Tournament

SPORTS
June 17, 2001 | THOMAS BONK
This would be a fairly good time for somebody to do something dramatic here at the U.S. Open, now that Tiger Woods has all but played himself out of it. Here is the short version: Tiger has left the building, which means that for the first time in a long while, some other players have a chance. And here is some advice: Don't blow it. In the past year, we have conditioned ourselves to accept the obvious.
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SPORTS
June 15, 2001 | THOMAS BONK
Let's get this over with right now. Consider it fair warning: Any golfer who comes to the U.S. Open with the idea of trying to even the score is setting himself up for a nasty case of heartbreak. The U.S Open is simply not that kind of golf outing. It doesn't give breaks, it breaks you. The most common injury is a compound fracture of the psyche. With only a few exceptions, such as Tiger Woods' 15-shot victory last year at Pebble Beach, the winner doesn't triumph nearly as much as he survives.
SPORTS
June 15, 2001 | Thomas Bonk and Chris Dufresne
At 83, Tommy Bolt knows a thing or two about getting older, which is probably why he was so impressed with Hale Irwin's opening round of 67. Bolt, who won the 1958 U.S. Open on the same Southern Hills layout, says that Irwin, 56, is a clear threat to win a fourth U.S. Open title. Irwin was the 1974, '79 and '90 champion. "Mark my words, he's put himself in position to win this thing," Bolt said. "You simply can't count him out.
SPORTS
June 14, 2001 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tommy Bolt won the 1958 U.S. Open at Southern Hills but admits he probably would not have won had Tiger Woods been in the field. Bolt, who returned to Southern Hills this week as a visitor, says he thinks Woods is the best young player he has ever seen. Better than the young Gary Player? Better than the young Jack Nicklaus? "Yeah, I think he's better than they were," Bolt said during a Wednesday interview with reporters. "Actually, Tiger's dominating golf like [Ben] Hogan did in the early '50s.
SPORTS
June 14, 2001
* When: Today-Sunday. * Where: Southern Hills Country Club, Tulsa, Okla. * Television: (all times PDT) Today and Friday, 9 a.m.-noon, 2 p.m.-5 p.m., ESPN; noon-2 p.m., Ch. 4. Saturday and Sunday, 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Ch. 4. TEE TIMES All times PDT *--* Today Friday Group 4:30 a.m. 8:50 a.m. Angel Cabrera, Dennis Paulson, Bob May 4:40 a.m. 9 a.m. Clark Dennis, Gary Orr, Brian Henninger 4:50 a.m. 9:10 a.m. Chad Campbell, Marty Schiene, Stephen Gangluff 5 a.m. 9:20 a.m. Charles Raulerson Jr.
SPORTS
June 16, 2001 | CHRIS DUFRESNE and THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Best indication that the U.S. Golf Assn. is geographically challenged: The giant scoreboard that shows hole-by-hole scores for each player has made a few bogeys so far, basically because officials can't decide which countries some international players are from. Mathias Gronberg and Pierre Fulke are listed as living in England, which should come as a surprise to their families in Sweden. Retief Goosen, a South African, is listed as being English, and so is Peter Lonard, an Australian.
SPORTS
June 16, 2001 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Safe to say the 101st U.S. Open has not gone according to script when you must report Tiger Woods will make the cut--it was close, folks--and that the first question to one of Friday's tri-leaders was how to pronounce his name. "It's like Goosen," South Africa's Retief Goosen said. "Goose with an 'N'. " What happened to Tiger with a 'T'? " Hang with us. It was a long day. You needed an air-traffic controller to sort out the mess at Southern Hills.
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