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September 14, 1998 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patrick Rafter could have turned this Grand Slam into confinement, retreating into a self-protective shell as defending champion at the U.S. Open. A sea of doubt was out there. One former Open champion, John McEnroe, said the 25-year-old Australian was a one-Slam wonder. Another Open champion and the top-seeded player, Pete Sampras, said that the difference between himself and Rafter was 10 Grand Slams. Now it's nine.
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SPORTS
September 8, 2012 | Diane Pucin
In less time than it took Victoria Azarenka to win a third set over Maria Sharapova, Serena Williams pounded her way to a 6-1, 6-2 U.S. Open semifinal victory over defenseless Italian Sara Errani on Friday. The 30-year-old Williams, who is seeded fourth, will play top-seeded and top-ranked Azarenka in Saturday's final. Azarenka conquered Sharapova, 3-6, 6-2, 6-4, winning a 2-hour 42-minute semifinal in which the third set lasted 1:14. Williams won her match against Errani in 64 minutes.
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SPORTS
September 13, 1993 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Open, tennis' two-week walk on the wild side, was more like a pleasant stroll through the park for Pete Sampras, the one player whose serve no one could tame. You could get windburn from a Sampras serve. At the U.S. Open, you also got Sampras as a re-Pete champion Sunday, when the 22-year-old knocked 12 aces past Cedric Pioline to bag his third Grand Slam title, his second U.S. Open trophy and his second major championship in a row.
SPORTS
September 6, 2012 | Diane Pucin
Tomas Berdych giggled after he hit good shots on Arthur Ashe Stadium on Wednesday night. Sometimes it almost felt as if a situation comedy were being filmed. The sixth-seeded Berdych, who had shocked Roger Federer at the Wimbledon quarterfinals two years ago, tickled and teased the top-seeded Federer with whipping forehands and timely volleys until he upset him again with a 7-6 (1), 6-4, 3-6, 6-3 victory in the quarterfinals of the U.S. Open on Wednesday night. And then Berdych couldn't stop smiling.
SPORTS
September 13, 2004 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
The fate of three International Tennis Federation (ITF) umpires -- including Lynn Welch of the U.S. -- who were dismissed from the U.S. Open earlier this week after allegations they had mishandled their Olympic credentials in Athens last month -- will be decided this week, according to Stefan Fransson of Sweden, supervisor of officials for the ITF.
SPORTS
September 1, 1989 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
For years, people have wondered if there is anybody in tennis more boring than Stefan Edberg. The answer is probably not. Sure, like Bjorn Borg and Mats Wilander before him, Edberg carefully cultivates the classic low-key Swedish personality, but his is even lower key. If Edberg works at it, which he often does, he can make his face as blank as a snowscape in his hometown of Vastervik. At the U.S. Open a couple of years ago, Edberg was asked if he knew a joke. He said he knew a Norwegian joke.
SPORTS
September 8, 1998 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And now, for the boys' 12-and-under event . . . Junior tennis invaded the men's draw of the U.S. Open on Monday, taking over the Andre Agassi-Karol Kucera fourth-round match. It turned two adults into a couple of kids by the end of the third set at the National Tennis Center. You almost expected the 28-year-old Agassi to stick out his tongue at the 24-year-old Slovak, and say something like "He started it" to chair umpire Norm Chryst.
SPORTS
August 28, 2000 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serena Williams could scour the planet looking for the most formidable challenger to her reign as U.S. Open women's singles champion, but there's no need. She shares a home with her in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Housemate Venus Williams, her older sister, is the hottest player in tennis. After winning last month at Wimbledon, where she beat Serena in an emotional semifinal, Venus has gone on to win three more tournaments in a row and is riding a 19-match winning streak.
SPORTS
September 11, 1999 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
To the casual observer, the men's semifinals of the U.S. Open tennis tournament come down to Andre Agassi and three other guys. To the tennis expert, well, the same thing. Any way you look at it, all the stars seem aligned for Agassi: * He is No. 2 in the world and will become No. 1 if he beats No. 3 Yevgeny Kafelnikov of Russia in one of today's semifinals. If Kafelnikov wins, he'll be No. 1.
SPORTS
September 2, 2006 | Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer
Off days for 36-year-old Andre Agassi at his final U.S. Open have turned into sessions in crisis pain management, as he required another shot, an anti-inflammatory, on Friday to handle the severe discomfort. "He's doing all right, but it's as sore as can be," said his agent and best friend Perry Rogers. "We're doing what we can do." Agassi's compelling five-set classic in the second round against Marcos Baghdatis, which ended in the early morning hours here Friday, took its toll, and quickly.
SPORTS
August 31, 2012 | Diane Pucin
Late night tennis arrived Thursday at the U.S. Open and it took away Venus Williams. Angelique Kerber, a semifinalist here last year and the No. 6 seed this year, withstood a barrage of volleys from the 32-year-old Williams and took out the former champion 6-2, 5-7, 7-5. Williams had withdrawn from this tournament a year ago before her second round, announcing she had been diagnosed as suffering from Sjogren's syndrome, an autoimmune disease that...
SPORTS
September 4, 2010 | Diane Pucin
Denis Istomin left skid marks on Arthur Ashe Stadium Court, stark evidence of how hard he was trying. Istomin, a 23-year-old from Uzbekistan who is coached by his mother, drew applause from his opponent, Rafael Nadal three times after smacking extraordinary winners. And yet it was the maestro Nadal, the world's top-ranked player and the top-seeded man at the U.S. Open, who accepted a standing ovation at the end of his 6-2, 7-6 (5), 7-5 second-round victory Friday night at the U.S. Open.
SPORTS
September 7, 2008 | Chuck Culpepper, Special to The Times
NEW YORK -- The U.S. Open usually tests elite tennis players with clamor, chaos, humidity, wee-hours finishes and chronic spectator rudeness, but it's clearly over the top to toss in a tropical storm. Hanna's arrival Saturday at 2:40 p.m. EDT not only disfigured the closing-weekend schedule but did so enough to stir questions of whether the men's singles outcome will qualify as fair. After Roger Federer finished his masterful 6-3, 5-7, 7-5, 6-2 semifinal win over No. 3 Novak Djokovic in Arthur Ashe Stadium at 1:55 p.m. on Saturday, he said he hoped Rafael Nadal and Andy Murray could finish their concurrent semifinal in Louis Armstrong Stadium "so we can have a fair final on Sunday."
SPORTS
September 3, 2008 | Kurt Streeter
NEW YORK -- At the U.S. Open, Elena Dementieva has been pummeling tennis balls with the brute force of a battering ram and the ticktock consistency of a metronome. Mardy Fish, meantime, has little need for that kind of steadiness. He's spending most of his time slashing toward the net, a little McEnroe suddenly in his Floridian blood. Because neither Dementieva nor Fish possesses much star power, both have been floating off the radar, but both suddenly have a legitimate shot at making the finals.
SPORTS
August 30, 2008 | Chuck Culpepper, Special to The Times
NEW YORK -- Absurdly, after 947 tour matches, after 55 singles titles, after giving birth and coming back, after 18 long, competent years serving into that square on the other side of the net in tour events, Lindsay Davenport on Friday night ran across her first case of the serving yips. Arthur Ashe Stadium seemed to squirm, and pretty soon the woman departing her comeback U.S. Open by throwing her racket to the concrete on her way to the handshake would be not some hothead but, of all people, Lindsay Davenport.
SPORTS
August 27, 2008 | Chuck Culpepper, Special to The Times
NEW YORK -- After the winning clarity of Serena and Venus Williams carried the late afternoon and early evening, the globally famous enigma turned up at night. How would Roger Federer look Tuesday night near the end of his oft-tormented summer? Well, as it happened, he looked quite a bit like Roger Federer in a 6-3, 6-0, 6-3 win, partly because he benefited from a first-round draw of infinitely more mystery. "Never saw my opponent before," Federer said. "Never saw him play, obviously, 'cause I never saw him."
SPORTS
September 10, 2000 | JERRY CROWE
Not that many tried, but there was no escaping Anna Kournikova at the U.S. Open. Whether it was women's doubles with Jennifer Capriati, mixed doubles with childhood friend Max Mirnyi of Belarus or singles, where the 12th-seeded Kournikova was bounced by unheralded Justine Henin of Belgium in the third round, the fetching Russian seemed to always be playing a featured match on a stadium court. On television, of course.
SPORTS
August 28, 1991 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day after saying goodby to Andre Agassi, the U.S. Open came close to saying the same to Ivan Lendl, the 31-year-old three-time champion who ran a five-set marathon against a 19-year-old Dutchman and won by a neck. Lendl survived a 3-hour 37-minute first-round trial by firepower Tuesday, easing past big-serving Richard Krajicek, 3-6, 2-6, 6-4, 7-6 (7-5), 6-0, after Krajicek had injured his neck.
SPORTS
August 26, 2008 | Kurt Streeter
NEW YORK -- It wasn't supposed to be this tough. Rafael Nadal's forehand sailed wide. The scoreboard showed him behind, 3-2, in a first-set tiebreaker. The crowd stood, showering his opponent with love. Then, suddenly, predictably, the way he has done all year when it counts, the Spaniard pushed to the next level. He powered a backhand that forced an error. He hit an ace. Sending fast, heavily spun balls flying toward his opponent, he drew two more errors. Suddenly, the set was his. And with that, a match that looked as if it could have brought big trouble turned the way of the newly minted world No. 1, playing at the U.S. Open with the top seeding for the first time Monday.
SPORTS
August 25, 2008 | Chuck Culpepper, Special to The Times
NEW YORK -- As the 7-train screeches into the Shea Stadium/National Tennis Center stop, the year's last tennis Grand Slam says hello with quite the goofy billboard shouting from out the right-side window. It's Maria Sharapova pitching cameras, and while sticklers and other malcontents might point out that a torn rotator cuff means Sharapova won't actually, you know, play this U.S. Open, maybe the sign actually sort of works. Ever since May, four months after Sharapova had won the Australian Open and some had howled at the moon about a possible Sharapova Slam, the women's game has become a strange brew of hodgepodge and mishmash.
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