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August 28, 1994 | KAREN TUMULTY and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Through the squalls and storms of the past few months, no one has been more doggedly upbeat about President Clinton's ambitious plan for national health care reform than senior adviser Ira Magaziner and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. Magaziner, chief architect of Clinton's health care plan, took great delight in calling attention to his office bookshelves.
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NEWS
April 27, 2002 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a time when Congress is stalemated on a spate of issues, one measure is an eye-catching exception: a major rewrite of federal farm policy. While most other major legislation seems doomed to election-year oblivion, congressional negotiators put the finishing touches Friday on a bill that would increase agriculture subsidies a staggering 70% over the next decade.
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NEWS
June 13, 1995 | MELISSA HEALY and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Republican critics of affirmative action hailed Monday's Supreme Court decision as a mandate for even more sweeping action by Congress and vowed to press home their attack on federal programs of racial preference.
NEWS
April 9, 2002 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House is poised this week to approve legislation that would ease donation-reporting rules for a broad class of political groups, opening a new front in the campaign finance debate. Critics say the measure, coming just weeks after the enactment of a landmark law to limit donations to national political parties, could encourage certain groups to receive huge contributions from wealthy donors while escaping effective scrutiny.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The strains of Lee Greenwood's "God Bless the U.S.A." filled the auditorium as more than 2,000 new Americans watched a film clip of what it means to be an American: Air Force fighters streaking across the sky, wheat fields glistening in the sun, the Hollywood sign soaring above the horizon. Minutes later, these men and women from 88 countries concluded the emotional ceremony that bestowed U.S. citizenship upon them.
NEWS
June 16, 1992 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It brought down a President, spawned an assertive mood in Congress, fostered a new generation of political leaders, brought about an array of reforms in government, altered American journalism and set a benchmark for subsequent political scandals. In short, the Watergate scandal radically transformed American politics. Yet many of the changes wrought by what began as "a third rate burglary" on June 17, 1972, appear to be evaporating.
NEWS
October 31, 1995 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The vote in Quebec on secession from Canada should stand as a clear warning to Americans about the threat that bilingualism poses to unity in the United States, House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) said Monday. "Allowing bilingualism to continue to grow is very dangerous," Gingrich said after addressing a technology and business forum at Georgia Tech in Atlanta. "We should insist on English as a common language. . . . That's what binds us together."
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James E. Rogan has wedged his 6-foot-1 frame into a phone booth between the men's room and a kitchenette in a House office building. The air stinks of stale cigar smoke and there's no place to sit. But who cares? His 20 minutes in this cramped closet will be rewarded handsomely. On the other end of the line is radio talk show host G. Gordon Liddy, broadcasting live to a syndicated audience of hard-right Clinton haters.
NEWS
May 13, 2000 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. George W. Bush, taking a new direction in his evolving approach to gun control, launched a program Friday to give free trigger locks to any handgun owners in Texas who want them. The presumptive Republican presidential nominee initiated the program with little advance notice, setting aside $1 million per year in state funds for five years to purchase trigger locks that will be distributed through police stations and fire departments.
NEWS
August 11, 1991 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her father had been missing in Indochina for nearly 25 years, and suddenly there was a controversial photograph of him, along with two other American MIA soldiers, somewhere in the jungle. Shelby Robertson Quast was desperate for information, and when she spotted Defense Secretary Dick Cheney at a POW-MIA meeting here last month, she made a beeline for his table.
NEWS
March 31, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, under pressure from fellow Republicans eager to hold their slim margin in the House and recapture control of the Senate, is beginning to embrace the role of presidential campaigner. Early in his tenure, Bush shied from fund-raising, seeking to set himself apart from the openly aggressive approach President Clinton took in building Democrats' treasury chests. Then, in the first months after the Sept.
NEWS
March 26, 2002 | RICHARD SIMON and EDMUND SANDERS and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush administration Monday released thousands of documents on its energy task force, showing that industry groups provided substantial input in drafting the president's energy plan. In putting out 11,000 pages of documents before a midnight deadline, the Energy Department gave new ammunition to critics of the administration's energy policy, who say it is tilted in favor of the coal, gas, oil and nuclear industries.
NEWS
March 5, 2002 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With negotiations dragging on longer than expected, final action stalled again Monday in the Senate on legislation to overhaul the nation's voting machinery and procedures. Democrats failed for the second time in four days to overcome a Republican-led filibuster of the bill, prompting Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) to shelve the measure. He said that lawmakers today would instead begin a lengthy debate on energy policy.
NEWS
February 13, 2002 | NICK ANDERSON and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The House on Tuesday opened a freewheeling debate on money in politics, with Republican leaders beseeching about two dozen undecided GOP lawmakers to help derail a proposal to limit large donations from unions, corporations and wealthy individuals. The leaders, claiming that GOP control of the House could be at stake, today will try to amend a bill that would ban the unlimited donations to national political parties that are known as soft money.
NEWS
February 13, 2002 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three political fund-raising scandals. Two maverick presidential campaigns. One White House veto. And more than a decade of frustration, reversals and dashed hopes. That's what it has taken for supporters of campaign finance reform to reach a House vote expected today that may constitute their best chance yet to force their vision into law. In their decade-plus of struggle, reformers have been compelled to ruthlessly narrow their aims.
NEWS
February 12, 2002 | JANET HOOK and NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the House battle on campaign finance reform legislation starts today, frantic Republican leaders are warning their troops that the future strength of the GOP is at risk if the bill passes. But a key party warrior has been missing from the battlefield: President Bush, who has been keeping a low profile in the House's pivotal debate on limiting special-interest contributions to politics.
NEWS
December 27, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Expressing frustration over the federal government shutdown and the strain on furloughed workers, about 100 government employees Tuesday staged a "work-in" at a Baltimore Social Security Administration office. Chanting slogans--"Congress, we want to work!"--the American Federation of Government Employees Local 1923 reversed the normal bargaining practice of withholding labor by urging its members to report to their jobs.
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | NICK ANDERSON
The two dozen Republicans who represent California in Congress usually give far closer scrutiny to Democratic plots on Capitol Hill than those in the state Capitol. With good reason: Republicans here have their hands full managing a precarious majority in the House of Representatives and a somewhat firmer majority in the Senate against the maneuvers of a wily Democratic president.
NEWS
February 3, 2002 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Big tax cuts. Big increases in defense spending. And the return of federal budget deficits that squeeze the rest of government. Suddenly the battle over the budget that President Bush will release Monday is beginning to look a lot like the 1980s.
NEWS
February 2, 2002 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed like a productive day for Elizabeth Hanford Dole. She was in Houston last September for a speech, and an influential supporter pulled together a luncheon fund-raiser at a snazzy hotel for Dole's U.S. Senate campaign in North Carolina. Dole, the race's likely Republican nominee, went home with a tidy $20,000. But now she's paying an unexpected political price. The host of that fund-raiser was Kenneth L. Lay, then-chairman of the still-solvent Enron Corp.
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