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NEWS
June 16, 1991 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Ronald Reagan on Saturday labeled as "absolute fiction" charges that he or his campaign staff conducted talks with Iran to prevent the freeing of American hostages held at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran before the 1980 election.
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NEWS
July 9, 1995 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Bob Dole's assiduous efforts to curry favor with religious and social conservatives--a major theme of his presidential campaign for the last few months--appears to be paying off, yielding words of praise from leaders of the conservative movement and preventing his Republican rivals from monopolizing the support of this key GOP primary voting bloc. In the past several weeks, the Senate majority leader has engineered the defeat of surgeon general nominee Dr. Henry W. Foster Jr.
NEWS
October 20, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hours after riots erupted in Los Angeles last May, Gov. Bill Clinton debated whether to visit an inner-city neighborhood and speak about racial tensions. The inspiration was political but also historical: During the 1968 presidential campaign, Robert F. Kennedy had given a dramatic speech in Indianapolis after Martin Luther King Jr. was slain, trying to calm an explosive situation. Clinton was keenly aware of the parallel.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2000 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 9:15 Tuesday night soap-opera star Nancy Lee Grahn, who plays attorney Alexis Davis on ABC's "General Hospital," stepped in front of a banner that read "Daytime for Gore/Lieberman" and, wearing a long black skirt and pink leather jacket, faced a bank of television cameras. The political gathering for Democratic soap-opera stars had started more than an hour late.
NEWS
March 1, 1998 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's no surprise that cigarette makers and anti-tobacco law firms are lobbying hard in Congress for the giant tobacco truce. The deal would give the former crucial legal protections and the latter fat fees. But from the nooks and crannies of the economy, a hodgepodge of groups whose stake in the outcome is less apparent also is competing for lawmakers' attention--ranging from insurance giant Aetna and the hotel workers union to pint-sized cigarette marketer Single Stick.
NEWS
August 30, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton wrapped up a restless vacation on Martha's Vineyard island on Saturday having made a cautious--sometimes faltering--start on repairing some of the damage to his presidency. Fresh from his Aug. 17 admission that he had an inappropriate relationship with former White House intern Monica S. Lewinsky, Clinton arrived in Martha's Vineyard 12 days ago with two goals. One was to demonstrate that he still retains political authority with the voters.
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One year after the Columbine High School shooting, newly energized gun-control forces are grappling with a potentially critical split within their ranks over a key strategic decision: How far can they hope to go in reining in guns? For all the recent talk of "smart" guns, trigger locks and other innovations in weapons safety, an increasingly vocal minority in the gun-control community is arguing that nothing short of a ban on handguns will stem gun violence.
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | SARA FRITZ and DWIGHT MORRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Whenever Sen. Bill Bradley (D-N.J.) goes to Los Angeles to raise campaign funds, the generous outpouring of money he receives from top movie studio executives is enough to make any politician envious. Disney Chief Executive Officer Michael D. Eisner is said to be "territorial" about hosting Hollywood fund-raisers for Bradley, an old friend, and invariably hundreds of executives respond by writing personal checks to the former New York Knicks basketball star.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1998 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there is anyone who has thus far avoided imagining the allegations of adultery swirling around President Clinton, well, the plot line is in Technicolor--and about to open at a theater near the White House. "Primary Colors," the thinly veiled novel about a Gov. Jack Stanton (who happens to talk and act very much like our current chief executive and gets dogged by a sex scandal on the presidential campaign trail) is now a $64-million Mike Nichols film starring box-office draw John Travolta.
NEWS
November 22, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the budget deadlock unlocked, members of Congress are returning to their districts to explain what the fight in Washington was all about. In the case of Rep. Randy (Duke) Cunningham (R-San Diego), the fight was a real one, albeit brief. Cunningham says he is unscathed and forgives his Democratic assailant, Rep. Jim Moran of Virginia. Late Friday, Moran pushed Cunningham from behind as they were leaving the House chambers and then took a swing at him, which Cunningham blocked.
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