Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Population
IN THE NEWS

United States Population

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 17, 1990 | BETH ANN KRIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A breaching whale on the sea of American demographics, the baby boom generation shocked its elders early on. They rocked out with Elvis, the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. As teen-agers and young adults, they turned to civil rights, the women's movement and anti-war protests, launching an entire fashion industry of rainbow-hued hippie clothes in the process.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
May 1, 2005 | Sarah Grausz
Pundits spew bitter screeds about its horrors and folkies ululate about its heartbreak in songs, but how much do you really know about the human species' eternal, often unsettling movement about the globe? * 1. What is the estimated number of illegal immigrants in the United States? a) 800,000 b) 1.4 million c) 5.6 million d) More than 10 million * 2. Rank countries from which immigrants have come to the United States illegally, from most to least: Colombia El Salvador Mexico Guatemala * 3.
Advertisement
OPINION
May 1, 2005 | Sarah Grausz
Pundits spew bitter screeds about its horrors and folkies ululate about its heartbreak in songs, but how much do you really know about the human species' eternal, often unsettling movement about the globe? * 1. What is the estimated number of illegal immigrants in the United States? a) 800,000 b) 1.4 million c) 5.6 million d) More than 10 million * 2. Rank countries from which immigrants have come to the United States illegally, from most to least: Colombia El Salvador Mexico Guatemala * 3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newly released 2000 census data depict several of California's largest Latino groups as shrinking in the 1990s, an unexpected, improbable result that has community agencies complaining and demographers concerned. Some experts attribute it to a simple change in the census form. Others believe it is a consequence of an evolving pan-Latino consciousness that discourages people from retaining strong national identities.
NEWS
December 28, 1990 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
The 1990 census, already fraught with controversy, may have failed to count as many as 4.7 million U.S. residents, a major discrepancy between final population totals released this week and Census Bureau estimates issued last October. The margin of difference could change as Census Bureau officials revise their estimates.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | COLLEEN KRUEGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the Forty-Niners of the Gold Rush to the Depression-era farm workers of John Steinbeck's novels, California has seen most of the nation's great migratory races from the finish line. But a new Census Bureau report shows that, as American migration slows from a run to a crawl, more people are moving out of the Golden State than are moving in.
NEWS
September 30, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
In a blow to California and other states with large immigrant populations, the Senate voted Friday to bar the Census Bureau from counting illegal aliens in the 1990 population count. "I'm stunned," said Santa Ana City Council member Miguel A. Pulido. Pulido and other Santa Ana council members say that the 1980 census substantially under-counted its population at 215,000. The city has been lobbying hard to have its illegal alien population--estimated at 50,000--included in the 1990 count.
NEWS
January 13, 1991 | ITABARI NJERI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in what some think were the good old days, Henry Ford ran his company's English Melting Pot School. Graduation was a public spectacle in which the auto maker's foreign-born employees, dressed in Old World costumes and carrying signs noting their birthplace, marched into a large, kettle-shaped prop labeled "Melting Pot." Moments later, they would emerge dressed in neat business suits and waving small American flags. America, circa 1916.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | JENNIFER TOTH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is a new--and ominous--face on America's expanding homeless population: Families with young children have become the fastest-growing segment of the population now living on the nation's streets. A 1990 survey of 30 American cities by the U.S. Conference of Mayors shows that families with youngsters now represent at least one-third of the homeless population--up from a relative handful a decade before. In Los Angeles; New York; Louisville, Ky.; Alexandria, Va.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
With the release of the Census Bureau's preliminary 1990 population count, Democrats feel the electoral noose tightening around their necks. Although the numbers could still change in the final tally, the figures show a clear trend away from the Northeast and Midwest and toward the South and West. And that points to more difficulty for the Democrats.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS and RAY HERNDON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From the moment segregation in America had a name, it has referred to the separateness of blacks and whites. But during the last decade, while blacks were making some progress in residential integration, Latinos and Asians became more isolated from other racial groups in the vast majority of the nation's large metropolitan areas, from Chicago's red-bricked grid to Phoenix's beige sprawl, a Times analysis of 2000 census data shows.
NEWS
June 24, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 10 years of waiting for new census data and three months of analyzing it, the nation's demographics experts are sharply divided on whether segregation of blacks eased in the 1990s. Three main factions have emerged, offering up the same numbers as proof that (1) integration reached historic levels, (2) integration stalled or (3) what looks like new integration is a temporary mirage. On their debate turns a fundamental notion of American progress.
NEWS
May 12, 2001 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Hyundai Motor America learned that its Elantra and Accent models were striking a chord with nurses, the car company turned to Census Bureau data to shape advertising that would reach the largely female profession. Hyundai now is anxiously awaiting the release of detailed income, education and occupation data from the 2000 census, with an eye toward honing that specialized pitch.
NEWS
May 10, 2001 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new census study of America's Latinos dramatizes the pivotal role that people of Mexican ancestry are playing in reshaping the nation's demographic makeup. People of Mexican lineage, who two decades ago were largely confined to the Southwest, California and Chicago, are now settling around the country and gaining ground in numbers on such long-established groups as German Americans and Irish Americans, mostly the offspring of earlier waves of immigration. Mexicans accounted for 58.
NEWS
April 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Census Bureau did not record a single Miccosukee on the tribe's reservation in its 2000 count, although hundreds of American Indians live on or near the land in the Everglades. Many are Miccosukees, but Indians from other tribes also live on or near the reservation. Miccosukee Chairman Billy Cypress did not return a phone call for comment Friday.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's long-predicted new ethnic order became reality in the 1990s, as Latinos ascended to dominance in Los Angeles and nonwhites came to outnumber whites regionwide by more than 3 million, census data released Thursday showed. As the millennium dawned, the combined population of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Riverside counties hit 16,373,645--surpassing the statewide total in 1960 and topping all other states in 2000 except Texas and New York.
NEWS
December 28, 1990 | Ronald Brownstein
19 congressional seats will change hands, with eight states gaining and 13 states losing representatives. Here's where the battles will be most intense over redrawing of district lines: CALIFORNIA: Republicans, still smarting from the congressional redistricting imposed by Democrats 10 years ago, are positioned to do better with Pete Wilson holding the governorship. Democrats still control the Legislature but are unlikely to match their gain of six U.S. House seats after the 1980 census.
NEWS
January 27, 1999 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the U.S. Supreme Court this week cast a new cloud over the use of sampling by the Census Bureau, results from a test of the controversial counting method here were giving its foes and fans even more to debate. Census officials said that using the statistical method, they counted 403,313 residents in Sacramento during a dry run last spring. Without sampling, which is designed to cut census costs and avoid an undercount, they tallied 349,197 people.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The census failed to count 529,782 Californians last year, an estimated 1.5% of the state's population, Democratic members of the Census Monitoring Board said Wednesday. The proportion of the people overlooked in the census is higher in states with large minority populations, according to the report by Democrats. The government is using the original census tally as the official figure for the number of people living in the country last April 1--281,421,906, to be exact.
NEWS
March 13, 2001 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly one in every three Americans is a member of a minority group, reflecting a massive surge in immigration during the 1990s, the Census Bureau reported Monday. "The change in diversity will be our big story," said John Long, chief of the Census Bureau population division, as his agency announced its overview of race and ethnicity--a report highlighted by a surge in the nation's Asian population. Census Bureau figures show the total population of Asians jumped to a range of 10.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|