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United States Population

NEWS
February 28, 1990 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Less than a month before the start of the 1990 Census, Mitch Snyder, perhaps the nation's best-known advocate for the homeless, is urging homeless people to boycott the census, arguing that the counting process will vastly understate the number of people without homes and play into the hands of politicians seeking to minimize the problem.
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NEWS
April 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Census Bureau is now uncertain whether 70% of Americans will return their census forms as it had hoped, a spokesman said. "Fifty-five percent is today's figure (for forms returned), and we're still hoping people will get them in," said the spokesman. On April 26, the bureau will send enumerators to interview members of households from which forms have not been received. In some cases, the enumerators will find that homes have been torn down or are temporarily vacant.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 2-year-long legal battle over how best to count minorities, immigrants and poor people in the 1990 census appears headed back to court as a group of cities and states, including Los Angeles and California, have accused the Bush Administration of sabotaging a court-sanctioned agreement aimed at achieving a complete count. Los Angeles City Atty. James K. Hahn, along with Atty. Gen. John K.
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | From United Press International
The Census Bureau said Friday that the nation's lethargic rate of census returns jumped by 2 percentage points in 24 hours to 59%, with Wisconsin, Iowa and other Midwestern states leading the country. "Stand up and be counted now!" Census Bureau Director Barbara Bryant said. "Fill out and return your 1990 census forms this weekend."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1990
Here are some common questions about the 1990 U.S. Census, and some answers: Q. How long will it take to fill one out? A. The questionnaire comes in two forms. One of every six U.S. households receives a copy of the "long form," which takes about 43 minutes to complete. But the rest are getting the "short form," which takes an average of 14 minutes to fill out. Q. What if I don't get a form in the mail or lose it? A. Just call one of the bureau's local district offices and ask for a replacement.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you're between 26 and 44, you're a baby boomer--like it or not. And if you don't fit the "thirtysomething" stereotype, never mind. That's only because most people who are out to entertain you, sell you something, or simply catch your eye haven't the faintest clue as to who you really are. Thia Golson is out to set things right.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Confronted with a rising chorus of complaints about flaws in the 1990 census, officials of the U.S. Census Bureau said Wednesday that about 1.9 million American households may not have received census forms. In a meeting with Rep. Tom Sawyer (D-Ohio), chairman of a House subcommittee on the census, bureau officials said that many forms were addressed to the homes of people who actually receive their mail at post office boxes.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1990 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Earlier this week at a luncheon in Los Angeles, the publisher of the Knoxville Journal in Tennessee asked a waitress, a Latina, whether she read a newspaper. The woman had come to the United States for the economic opportunity 12 years ago, Knoxville publisher Gerald Garcia recounted, and during the playing of the national anthem that had just completed, she had been the first one among those near his table to put her hand over her heart. No, she answered him.
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | SUE ELLEN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Representatives of a coalition of the nation's mayors--including New York City's David N. Dinkins--met for the first time Wednesday with Commerce Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher to complain of a nationwide population undercount and urge that the figures be revised as quickly as possible. The meeting was an effort on the part of about 20 cities to pressure federal census officials to adjust population figures before states and cities reapportion political districts starting next year.
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