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February 2, 1989 | GARY LIBMAN, Times Staff Writer
When Der-Shsuan Lii arrived in the United States in 1985, he read and wrote English well enough to complete a master's degree at USC. But it was a different story when it came to speaking his new language. Lii, a native of Taiwan, had trouble with English vowels, l's and r's and the th sound. There were many words he could not pronounce.
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NEWS
February 2, 1989 | GARY LIBMAN, Times Staff Writer
When Der-Shsuan Lii arrived in the United States in 1985, he read and wrote English well enough to complete a master's degree at USC. But it was a different story when it came to speaking his new language. Lii, a native of Taiwan, had trouble with English vowels, l's and r's and the th sound. There were many words he could not pronounce.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2000
One of Washington's thoroughly bad ideas is a legislative proposal to help developers skip local authorities and go directly to federal courts in challenging local land-use decisions. There are few resources that are as local as land use. Decisions on the issue should remain in local hands. The House, scheduled to take up the measure today, should vote it down. The bill is being sold to House members as a noncontroversial procedural fix. It is far more than that.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
The CIA says the average Soviet citizen earned the equivalent of $8,850 last year, less than half the average American's earnings of $19,970. The CIA's "Handbook of Economic Statistics 1989" shows that the U.S. figure was higher than that of other major non-communist countries, with the average Japanese shown as earning $14,340 and the average West German $14,260. Earnings of the average American grew by 2.9% in 1988; the average Soviet citizen had an increase of only 0.5%.
NEWS
April 1, 1998 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal agricultural officials are launching an investigation this week into the death of a government pilot, the fourth killed in a 17-month period while shooting coyotes from a low-flying plane as part of a little-known federal program. LaWanna Clark, 51, of Mariposa, Calif., was killed March 11 when the plane she was piloting crashed during a pursuit of coyotes on a cattle ranch near the Grapevine in Kern County. A co-pilot instructor survived with a broken leg and multiple bruises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1991 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousand Oaks had fewer major crimes last year than any of more than 170 cities with populations over 100,000, according to preliminary FBI crime statistics. The city, which also had the lowest number of crimes of any major U.S. city in 1989, reported 3,116 major crimes in 1990. That was a slight increase over the 2,952 crimes reported in the previous year. Local crime statistics show that Simi Valley is also one of the nation's safest cities of 100,000 people or more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1994 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The top candidate for Simi Valley police chief is known as a consensus-builder who has made striking changes in his three years as police chief in the small college town of Urbana, Ill., officials there said Friday. Urbana Chief Willard Schlieter, 53, acknowledged Friday he is among Simi Valley's top four candidates, but would not confirm that he is the first choice to replace outgoing Chief Lindsey Paul Miller.
WORLD
April 18, 2004 | David Lamb, Times Staff Writer
The reward for helping the Americans during the Vietnam War took 29 years to materialize, but for the 15,000 Laotian Hmong in this sun-baked refugee camp, it was a payout beyond their wildest dreams: U.S. citizenship. "I can't believe we'll be Americans," said Sui Yang, 60, who fought with CIA-backed Hmong guerrillas against the communist Pathet Lao in the mountains of Laos. "We heard rumors for years this was going to happen, but they were always only rumors. Most of us gave up hoping.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1994 | MACK REED and DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Crime in Ventura County fell by 9.1% in 1993, to a rate of 38.3 serious crimes per 1,000 residents--the lowest in at least 15 years. The rate was driven downward by a dramatic 13.7% drop in crime in Oxnard--the county's largest and usually its most crime-ridden city--and by double-digit percentage drops in crime in Port Hueneme, Fillmore and Simi Valley.
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