Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Postal Service
IN THE NEWS

United States Postal Service

FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
January 22, 1995
A sampling of domestic first-class postage rates around the world. Japan: .80 Germany: .64 Denmark: .61 Switzerland: .60 Austria: .54 France: .52 Norway: .51 Belgium: .47 Italy: .46 Netherlands: .46 Sweden: .41 Great Britain: .39 Australia: .35 United States: .32 Canada: .31 Source: United States Postal Service. Prices based on exchange rates of Dec. 1, 1994.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
September 25, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON - Facing a “precarious financial condition” as fewer customers use its services, the United States Postal Service proposed another round of rate increases Wednesday to go into effect in January - its largest price hike since 2002. The plan - which would raise the cost of first-class stamps for one-ounce letters to 49 cents from 46 cents, among other changes - is intended to generate an additional $2 billion in annual revenue for the Postal Service. The agency expects to lose about $6 billion in the current fiscal year.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1994
So much has been written and said about the poor service quality of the United States Postal Service lately, I'm sure they will appreciate kudos when they do something above and beyond the call of duty. I have been eagerly awaiting a certified letter . . . running out every day when the mail carrier came to see if my letter was there. No luck. The carrier took my phone number and said she would call when the letter came in; early one recent morning she gave me the good news! Now that is service!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2013 | By Kate Mather
Sometimes when dog bites man, it is news. The United States Postal Service released Wednesday its "top dog attack city rankings" with a "most vicious" Los Angeles topping the list. The City of Angels saw 69 dog attacks on postal employees in the 2012 fiscal year, according to an agency statement. San Antonio and Seattle tied for second with 42 incidents each. Two other California cities made the 14-spot list : San Francisco, which came in fourth with 38 attacks, and Sacramento, which tied Baltimore for eighth place with 29. Wichita, Kan., rounded out the rankings with 20 incidents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1989
As a United States Postal Service letter carrier, your article on the Postal Service really hit home ("Grievances Load Down Mailbags," Part I, May 25). It was both to the point and accurate as to the conditions that exist inside the Postal Service. However, as was stated, the problems that exist inside the Postal Service are no greater than the problems that exist outside the Postal Service. What the Postal Service, and the country as a whole, should do to solve these problems is first of all live by the Golden Rule: Namely, treat others as you would like others to treat you. Second, the Postal Service, as well as the rest of the country, needs to concentrate more on quality and less on quantity.
MAGAZINE
May 7, 1989
The U.S. Postal Service was not directed by federal safety inspectors to redesign jobs or any computer equipment at its Bulk Mail Center in Pittsburgh. Although the Occupational Safety and Health Administration did issue a citation against the high-speed induction unit operations in that facility, the citation was withdrawn when the Postal Service ergonomists demonstrated that the injury incidence cited by OSHA was incorrectly calculated. JIM VAN LOOZEN UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE Washington, D.C. Judy Pasternak responds: As reported in the story, a settlement was negotiated calling for employee education and, if a Postal Service consultant recommended it, new equipment at the Bulk Mail Center.
OPINION
October 25, 1987
I believe the United States government's surveillance of the National Committee Against Repressive Legislation did not cease in 1971 as the article implies. I believe I have proof the FBI presses on or some other federal agency picked up and is carrying on. In 1986, an envelope containing a check I sent to NCARL on April 3 was returned to me bearing a yellow sticker stating "No Forwarding Address on File Unable to Forward." The envelope had been opened and resealed with plastic tape.
NATIONAL
July 6, 2010 | By Jennifer Martinez, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Postal Service on Tuesday proposed a 2-cent increase to the price of a first-class stamp, hoping to cut into a massive budget shortfall as companies caught in the recession have slashed mailings and people are increasingly communicating via e-mail and social networks. The post office, facing an estimated $7-billion shortfall in 2011, seeks to charge 46 cents for a first-class stamp, effective Jan. 2. The hike, along with other proposed increases to the cost of mailing magazines and newspapers, would raise an estimated $2.3 billion by the end of next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1994
As an employee of the United States Postal Service, I welcome the opportunity to respond to Mr. Bill Smith's letter ("Don't Cater to Last-Minute Tax Filers," April 24) and clarify some common misconceptions about the Postal Service. We work 24 hours per day, six days per week (and Sundays at limited hours) at the Postal Service whether it's tax night or any other night. Many people don't realize that the majority of our work is done while the rest of the country is at home with their families or asleep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2013 | By Kate Mather
Sometimes when dog bites man, it is news. The United States Postal Service released Wednesday its "top dog attack city rankings" with a "most vicious" Los Angeles topping the list. The City of Angels saw 69 dog attacks on postal employees in the 2012 fiscal year, according to an agency statement. San Antonio and Seattle tied for second with 42 incidents each. Two other California cities made the 14-spot list : San Francisco, which came in fourth with 38 attacks, and Sacramento, which tied Baltimore for eighth place with 29. Wichita, Kan., rounded out the rankings with 20 incidents.
NATIONAL
April 26, 2012 | Ian Duncan
The Senate passed a bill aimed at salvaging the United States Postal Service, which is hemorrhaging millions of dollars a day as fewer people send letters and conduct business by mail. The legislation would allow the postal service to reduce its pension and retiree benefit costs and pave the way for service changes. The bill passed by a vote of 62 to 37 Wednesday, after two days of voting on amendments. Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.), one of the bill's sponsors, said it would put the postal service back on course to financial health.
NATIONAL
July 6, 2010 | By Jennifer Martinez, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Postal Service on Tuesday proposed a 2-cent increase to the price of a first-class stamp, hoping to cut into a massive budget shortfall as companies caught in the recession have slashed mailings and people are increasingly communicating via e-mail and social networks. The post office, facing an estimated $7-billion shortfall in 2011, seeks to charge 46 cents for a first-class stamp, effective Jan. 2. The hike, along with other proposed increases to the cost of mailing magazines and newspapers, would raise an estimated $2.3 billion by the end of next year.
OPINION
March 8, 2010
You've heard this story before: Business is down, obligations to retired employees are growing and management is considering layoffs and service shutdowns one day a week. In this case, the organization in trouble is the United States Postal Service, which is projected to lose $7 billion this year and as much as $238 billion over the next decade. After commissioning several financial and management studies, the Postal Service is asking Congress for permission to end Saturday delivery. Postal Service customers -- virtually everyone in the United States -- should take a harder-headed look at the situation.
TRAVEL
January 22, 1995
A sampling of domestic first-class postage rates around the world. Japan: .80 Germany: .64 Denmark: .61 Switzerland: .60 Austria: .54 France: .52 Norway: .51 Belgium: .47 Italy: .46 Netherlands: .46 Sweden: .41 Great Britain: .39 Australia: .35 United States: .32 Canada: .31 Source: United States Postal Service. Prices based on exchange rates of Dec. 1, 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1994
So much has been written and said about the poor service quality of the United States Postal Service lately, I'm sure they will appreciate kudos when they do something above and beyond the call of duty. I have been eagerly awaiting a certified letter . . . running out every day when the mail carrier came to see if my letter was there. No luck. The carrier took my phone number and said she would call when the letter came in; early one recent morning she gave me the good news! Now that is service!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1994
As an employee of the United States Postal Service, I welcome the opportunity to respond to Mr. Bill Smith's letter ("Don't Cater to Last-Minute Tax Filers," April 24) and clarify some common misconceptions about the Postal Service. We work 24 hours per day, six days per week (and Sundays at limited hours) at the Postal Service whether it's tax night or any other night. Many people don't realize that the majority of our work is done while the rest of the country is at home with their families or asleep.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON - Facing a “precarious financial condition” as fewer customers use its services, the United States Postal Service proposed another round of rate increases Wednesday to go into effect in January - its largest price hike since 2002. The plan - which would raise the cost of first-class stamps for one-ounce letters to 49 cents from 46 cents, among other changes - is intended to generate an additional $2 billion in annual revenue for the Postal Service. The agency expects to lose about $6 billion in the current fiscal year.
OPINION
March 8, 2010
You've heard this story before: Business is down, obligations to retired employees are growing and management is considering layoffs and service shutdowns one day a week. In this case, the organization in trouble is the United States Postal Service, which is projected to lose $7 billion this year and as much as $238 billion over the next decade. After commissioning several financial and management studies, the Postal Service is asking Congress for permission to end Saturday delivery. Postal Service customers -- virtually everyone in the United States -- should take a harder-headed look at the situation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1989
As a United States Postal Service letter carrier, your article on the Postal Service really hit home ("Grievances Load Down Mailbags," Part I, May 25). It was both to the point and accurate as to the conditions that exist inside the Postal Service. However, as was stated, the problems that exist inside the Postal Service are no greater than the problems that exist outside the Postal Service. What the Postal Service, and the country as a whole, should do to solve these problems is first of all live by the Golden Rule: Namely, treat others as you would like others to treat you. Second, the Postal Service, as well as the rest of the country, needs to concentrate more on quality and less on quantity.
MAGAZINE
May 7, 1989
The U.S. Postal Service was not directed by federal safety inspectors to redesign jobs or any computer equipment at its Bulk Mail Center in Pittsburgh. Although the Occupational Safety and Health Administration did issue a citation against the high-speed induction unit operations in that facility, the citation was withdrawn when the Postal Service ergonomists demonstrated that the injury incidence cited by OSHA was incorrectly calculated. JIM VAN LOOZEN UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE Washington, D.C. Judy Pasternak responds: As reported in the story, a settlement was negotiated calling for employee education and, if a Postal Service consultant recommended it, new equipment at the Bulk Mail Center.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|