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United States Presidential Elections 2000

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NEWS
November 12, 2001 | DOYLE McMANUS and BOB DROGIN and RICHARD O'REILLY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
If the U.S. Supreme Court had allowed Florida's courts to finish their abortive recount of last year's deadlocked presidential election, President Bush probably still would have won by several hundred votes, a comprehensive study of the uncounted ballots has found.
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NEWS
November 12, 2001 | DOYLE McMANUS and BOB DROGIN and RICHARD O'REILLY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
If the U.S. Supreme Court had allowed Florida's courts to finish their abortive recount of last year's deadlocked presidential election, President Bush probably still would have won by several hundred votes, a comprehensive study of the uncounted ballots has found.
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NEWS
June 11, 1999 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Words strain to describe the George W. Bush for president phenomenon, with its mix of hope, hype and hysteria. Superlatives fall short. Metaphors are overmatched. It's a juggernaut, say boosters. No, a soap bubble, say Democrats. No, a zeppelin, says one Republican rival, the Hindenburg itself! On Saturday, after months of breathless buildup, the George W. Bush campaign becomes something else--a reality.
NEWS
June 18, 1999 | MIKE DOWNEY
Bill Bradley, who is running for president, and Phil Jackson, who was Bradley's running mate when they played basketball for a living, met with the public Wednesday in a gymnasium for peewees. A pair of metal backboards, painted white, hovered above them at the Santa Monica Boys and Girls Club, where the two tall men's paths converged. "Bill's campaign is something I'm dropping," Jackson said, "now that I've got a real job."
NEWS
January 12, 1999 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
On New Year's Day, when most folks were focused on 1999, Brian Kennedy was casting his sights ahead to 2000. Kennedy is no millennium kook; he is a political aide to Republican presidential hopeful Lamar Alexander. And for Kennedy and others like him, the chime of midnight was as distinctive as the jingle of a cash register--and as loud and clear as a starting bell. Welcome to Campaign 2000. Entry fee: $55,000 a day.
NEWS
June 18, 1999 | MIKE DOWNEY
Bill Bradley, who is running for president, and Phil Jackson, who was Bradley's running mate when they played basketball for a living, met with the public Wednesday in a gymnasium for peewees. A pair of metal backboards, painted white, hovered above them at the Santa Monica Boys and Girls Club, where the two tall men's paths converged. "Bill's campaign is something I'm dropping," Jackson said, "now that I've got a real job."
NEWS
May 30, 1999 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The political fund-raiser last Sunday at a secluded mansion in the Blue Ridge foothills began like any other. A well-dressed, name-tagged brunch crowd plucked drinks from waiters' trays on a tented deck near the rose garden and the pool house. In the distance, a hawk circled lazily over the valley. But then the mountainous frame of Wes Unseld, a legendary pro-basketball center in the late 1960s and '70s, filled the entryway; a group surged toward him seeking handshakes and autographs.
NEWS
June 11, 1999 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Words strain to describe the George W. Bush for president phenomenon, with its mix of hope, hype and hysteria. Superlatives fall short. Metaphors are overmatched. It's a juggernaut, say boosters. No, a soap bubble, say Democrats. No, a zeppelin, says one Republican rival, the Hindenburg itself! On Saturday, after months of breathless buildup, the George W. Bush campaign becomes something else--a reality.
NEWS
May 30, 1999 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The political fund-raiser last Sunday at a secluded mansion in the Blue Ridge foothills began like any other. A well-dressed, name-tagged brunch crowd plucked drinks from waiters' trays on a tented deck near the rose garden and the pool house. In the distance, a hawk circled lazily over the valley. But then the mountainous frame of Wes Unseld, a legendary pro-basketball center in the late 1960s and '70s, filled the entryway; a group surged toward him seeking handshakes and autographs.
NEWS
January 12, 1999 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
On New Year's Day, when most folks were focused on 1999, Brian Kennedy was casting his sights ahead to 2000. Kennedy is no millennium kook; he is a political aide to Republican presidential hopeful Lamar Alexander. And for Kennedy and others like him, the chime of midnight was as distinctive as the jingle of a cash register--and as loud and clear as a starting bell. Welcome to Campaign 2000. Entry fee: $55,000 a day.
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