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NEWS
April 26, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House is preparing an executive order to ease the way for state and local authorities to sell publicly held airports, roads, bridges, sewage treatment plants and other facilities to produce income and reduce their budget drain, a White House official said Saturday. The plan, advanced by the Transportation Department, is being studied at the White House but is not expected to be presented to President Bush for several days, the official said.
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NEWS
June 10, 1998 | From Associated Press
President Clinton on Tuesday unleashed a torrent of public works money, signing a $203-billion transportation bill that will pay for everything from widening highways to installing flush toilets at rest stops. Critics call the legislation pork, but travelers won't have to look far to see the results: Over the next six years, the federal government will spend $167 billion improving, widening and extending its highway system. It will spend an additional $36 billion improving mass transit systems.
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BUSINESS
November 7, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
For all its importance, the issue that may turn out to be the economic hallmark of the 1990s--public investment in roads and bridges, sewers and airports--attracted little controversy in Tuesday's elections. When all the returns are counted, they'll probably show that voters in many states approved bond issues for water and sewage plants, toll roads and public transit, housing, airports and all those other things called infrastructure.
NEWS
September 29, 1993 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The challenge went out 10 months ago to architects, designers and engineers around the world. Could they meet the elemental human need for a clean and safe restroom capable of withstanding the rigors of American city streets? The response was staggering, contest organizers say. More than 2,000 people asked for applications, and 309 designs for automatically self-cleaning facilities were sent in by May.
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | From Associated Press
President Clinton on Tuesday unleashed a torrent of public works money, signing a $203-billion transportation bill that will pay for everything from widening highways to installing flush toilets at rest stops. Critics call the legislation pork, but travelers won't have to look far to see the results: Over the next six years, the federal government will spend $167 billion improving, widening and extending its highway system. It will spend an additional $36 billion improving mass transit systems.
NEWS
September 29, 1993 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The challenge went out 10 months ago to architects, designers and engineers around the world. Could they meet the elemental human need for a clean and safe restroom capable of withstanding the rigors of American city streets? The response was staggering, contest organizers say. More than 2,000 people asked for applications, and 309 designs for automatically self-cleaning facilities were sent in by May.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bitter dispute is pitting the U.S. government against the Orange County Water District in a showdown over whether the county should pay up to $150,000 a year for the right to use water now being dumped into the ocean. The water district wants to capture for household use 1.6 billion gallons of the spring runoff that each year feeds the flood control reservoir behind the Prado Dam in Riverside County. The U.S.
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House is preparing an executive order to ease the way for state and local authorities to sell publicly held airports, roads, bridges, sewage treatment plants and other facilities to produce income and reduce their budget drain, a White House official said Saturday. The plan, advanced by the Transportation Department, is being studied at the White House but is not expected to be presented to President Bush for several days, the official said.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
For all its importance, the issue that may turn out to be the economic hallmark of the 1990s--public investment in roads and bridges, sewers and airports--attracted little controversy in Tuesday's elections. When all the returns are counted, they'll probably show that voters in many states approved bond issues for water and sewage plants, toll roads and public transit, housing, airports and all those other things called infrastructure.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bitter dispute is pitting the U.S. government against the Orange County Water District in a showdown over whether the county should pay up to $150,000 a year for the right to use water now being dumped into the ocean. The water district wants to capture for household use 1.6 billion gallons of the spring runoff that each year feeds the flood control reservoir behind the Prado Dam in Riverside County. The U.S.
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