Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Public Works
IN THE NEWS

United States Public Works

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 2, 1998 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Wednesday night overwhelmingly approved one of the biggest public works bills in history, a $217-billion road-building bonanza that fiscal conservatives say makes a mockery of the Republican crusade to control government spending. The bill, which passed 337 to 80, would channel about $3 billion a year to car-dependent California over the next six years--a 52% increase over the state's current annual allocation--for a cornucopia of highway and transit projects.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 5, 2001 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly a century, every time the American economy boomed, it left an enduring legacy of vast new public works and bold private initiatives that were intended to benefit all. Interstate highways and universal phone service changed how we lived. The moonshot and environmental cleanup helped define who we are. But as the nation comes off the expansion of the 1990s, the longest in its history, it has few similar accomplishments to show for the good times.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 5, 1993 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although President-elect Bill Clinton pledged in his campaign to spend as much as $80 billion over four years to rebuild and improve the nation's public works, key advisers say that they now think he is likely to present a substantially scaled-down plan to Congress this month.
NEWS
March 8, 2001 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the nation speeds into the Internet Age, its old-economy infrastructure of airports, school buildings, power plants and roads is overwhelmed and heading for multiple breakdowns, a leading engineering group is warning in a "report card" to be issued today. The evaluation by a special panel of the American Society of Civil Engineers gives the U.S. infrastructure an overall grade of "D+." The group estimated that taxpayers at the federal, state and local levels would have to invest $1.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Value of Public Works Projects Up: The total value of public works projects ordered by national and local governments in March has increased 8.2% in the last year, the Nihon Keizai newspaper reported, citing a Construction Ministry report. Japan's public construction sector has come under fire from the United States for its bidding procedures, which shut out foreign competition.
NEWS
June 17, 1990 | from Associated Press
The nation's mayors took time out Saturday from bashing Washington to fight among themselves over whether the Constitution should be amended to guarantee cities a set percentage of federal revenues. The debate came as more than 200 mayors got down to business at their annual summer conference, taking committee action on dozens of proposed policy statements on issues ranging from taxes and transportation to housing and AIDS research. The U.S.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
For all its importance, the issue that may turn out to be the economic hallmark of the 1990s--public investment in roads and bridges, sewers and airports--attracted little controversy in Tuesday's elections. When all the returns are counted, they'll probably show that voters in many states approved bond issues for water and sewage plants, toll roads and public transit, housing, airports and all those other things called infrastructure.
NEWS
February 25, 1988
The nation's roads, airports and other public works systems will face a state of desperate disrepair without a massive infusion of public and private funds in the next decade, a blue-ribbon panel warned. The gloomy forecast from the National Council on Public Works Improvement, appointed by President Reagan and Congress, drew an immediate proposal by Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-N.Y.
NEWS
October 26, 1987 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
A member of a federal council studying the nation's highways, bridges, dams and other public works said Sunday that the country's infrastructure deserves a "C+" grade and can be expected to deteriorate further if spending on public works does not increase. "The demand for vital public works services is increasing faster than underlying physical capacity," Lowell B.
NEWS
March 8, 2001 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the nation speeds into the Internet Age, its old-economy infrastructure of airports, school buildings, power plants and roads is overwhelmed and heading for multiple breakdowns, a leading engineering group is warning in a "report card" to be issued today. The evaluation by a special panel of the American Society of Civil Engineers gives the U.S. infrastructure an overall grade of "D+." The group estimated that taxpayers at the federal, state and local levels would have to invest $1.
NEWS
July 31, 1998 | MARK FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a country committed to the inalienable right to go for a spin, the idea seems downright unconstitutional: Toll the interstates? Charge a fee for the freeway? Put the pinch on a public that has already paid for the costliest public works project in history? It looks like it's going to happen.
NEWS
June 23, 1998 | From Associated Press
The House voted overwhelmingly Monday to approve $21.1 billion for energy and water programs next year, including nearly $700 million more for waterway projects than President Clinton wants but less than he sought for research on solar and other forms of renewable energy. The House also approved an $8.2-billion bill for military construction for 1999, which, like the energy and water legislation, would shower vast amounts of money on lawmakers' home districts.
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | From Associated Press
President Clinton on Tuesday unleashed a torrent of public works money, signing a $203-billion transportation bill that will pay for everything from widening highways to installing flush toilets at rest stops. Critics call the legislation pork, but travelers won't have to look far to see the results: Over the next six years, the federal government will spend $167 billion improving, widening and extending its highway system. It will spend an additional $36 billion improving mass transit systems.
NEWS
May 23, 1998
Here is how members of the California House delegation voted Friday on the highway and mass transit bill. Democratic Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer also voted for the measure.
NEWS
May 23, 1998 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress gave final approval Friday to a $216-billion highway and mass transit bill that would funnel as much as $20 billion to California and create some 170,000 jobs throughout the state in the next six years. The transportation bill--the largest public works program in U.S. history--was painstakingly negotiated in recent weeks by lawmakers working assiduously to reconcile differing House and Senate versions of the legislation.
NEWS
April 2, 1998 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Wednesday night overwhelmingly approved one of the biggest public works bills in history, a $217-billion road-building bonanza that fiscal conservatives say makes a mockery of the Republican crusade to control government spending. The bill, which passed 337 to 80, would channel about $3 billion a year to car-dependent California over the next six years--a 52% increase over the state's current annual allocation--for a cornucopia of highway and transit projects.
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | From Associated Press
President Clinton on Tuesday unleashed a torrent of public works money, signing a $203-billion transportation bill that will pay for everything from widening highways to installing flush toilets at rest stops. Critics call the legislation pork, but travelers won't have to look far to see the results: Over the next six years, the federal government will spend $167 billion improving, widening and extending its highway system. It will spend an additional $36 billion improving mass transit systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER ADAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Salvos of criticism from environmental and peace activists as well as local residents bombarded the Navy's proposal to build a $200-million addition to its port facilities at the U.S. Naval Weapons Station in Seal Beach before and during the project's unveiling at a City Council meeting Monday night. But far from abandoning the proposal, Navy officials remained confident that community members would see benefits in the plan. "The station will continue to be a very quiet neighbor," Capt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Having the government hire unemployed artists, architects and laborers to erect ornate public buildings and politically charged murals probably wouldn't sit well in conservative Orange County these days. But during the Great Depression, the projects of the Works Progress Administration and other New Deal programs went forward with much more optimism than criticism.
NEWS
July 15, 1993 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Addressing a major concern of opponents of the North American Free Trade agreement, the Clinton Administration plans to press for new roads, power plants and other public improvements along the U.S.-Mexico border. Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown and four other Cabinet-level officials will join Mexican officials in a two-day conference beginning today in San Antonio.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|