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United States Reapportionment

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October 18, 1989 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the Census Bureau agreed in a settlement of a court suit to take special measures to count minorities and poor people in the 1990 census, the updated figures will probably not be used initially to determine congressional district boundaries or government aid allotments, a congressional researcher said Tuesday. Census officials have admitted that the 1980 Census missed an average 4.5% of the population of large cities and 6% of blacks and Latinos.
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NEWS
October 18, 1989 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the Census Bureau agreed in a settlement of a court suit to take special measures to count minorities and poor people in the 1990 census, the updated figures will probably not be used initially to determine congressional district boundaries or government aid allotments, a congressional researcher said Tuesday. Census officials have admitted that the 1980 Census missed an average 4.5% of the population of large cities and 6% of blacks and Latinos.
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NEWS
March 25, 1989 | CLAUDIA LUTHER, Times Political Writer
Reapportionment, another word for political trouble, will follow closely on the heels of the 1990 census. "That's where the rubber hits the road," one Democratic office-holder said of redistricting, "and the pavement is hot." Indeed, how legislative and congressional district lines are redrawn to equalize population will shape state and federal legislation into the 21st Century, affecting issues ranging from Social Security benefits to highway construction, air pollution and national security.
NEWS
February 26, 1989 | CLAUDIA LUTHER, Times Political Writer
Reapportionment, a 15-letter word for political trouble, is lurking around the corner of the 1990 census. Nothing is certain in this highly emotional, extremely important decennial process aimed at evening up legislative and congressional districts. But if things go as they appear now, California will get an additional four to six seats in Congress, and at least part of one could be in Orange County, where the population has grown considerably in the last decade.
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