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United States Relief Rwanda

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NEWS
July 24, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton defended his Administration's role in Rwanda on Saturday, dismissing criticism that the slow response of the United States and other Western nations had worsened the human catastrophe now unfolding in refugee camps along the Zaire-Rwanda border. Clinton told reporters in Hot Springs, Ark., where he was attending his 30-year high school reunion, that he had done "all I knew to do" to help the Rwandans, who have fled their homeland during a vicious civil war.
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NEWS
July 30, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton ordered 200 U.S. troops to Rwanda on Friday to reopen the airport in Kigali, the nation's capital. Officials insisted that American forces will be used solely for humanitarian aid and will not be drawn into peacekeeping operations. "The United States must do more," Clinton said at a White House news conference earlier in the day.
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NEWS
July 27, 1994 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. diplomatic and military officials, fending off criticism that American shipments of food and medicine to Rwandan refugees have come too little and too late, said Tuesday that the crisis is showing signs of abating. "It's not too late for the living," said J. Brian Atwood, administrator of the Agency for International Development, an arm of the State Department. He noted that some of the 1.
NEWS
July 30, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The massive humanitarian relief operation that President Clinton has ordered for the Central African country of Rwanda is presenting the military with one of its most daunting logistic challenges in recent memory, Pentagon officials said Friday. The sheer physical task of moving thousands of tons of desperately needed food, medicine and other supplies goes beyond anything American forces faced in Somalia or Saudi Arabia. To get aid to landlocked Rwanda, U.S.
NEWS
July 30, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton ordered 200 U.S. troops to Rwanda on Friday to reopen the airport in Kigali, the nation's capital. Officials insisted that American forces will be used solely for humanitarian aid and will not be drawn into peacekeeping operations. "The United States must do more," Clinton said at a White House news conference earlier in the day.
NEWS
July 30, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The massive humanitarian relief operation that President Clinton has ordered for the Central African country of Rwanda is presenting the military with one of its most daunting logistic challenges in recent memory, Pentagon officials said Friday. The sheer physical task of moving thousands of tons of desperately needed food, medicine and other supplies goes beyond anything American forces faced in Somalia or Saudi Arabia. To get aid to landlocked Rwanda, U.S.
NEWS
July 27, 1994 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. diplomatic and military officials, fending off criticism that American shipments of food and medicine to Rwandan refugees have come too little and too late, said Tuesday that the crisis is showing signs of abating. "It's not too late for the living," said J. Brian Atwood, administrator of the Agency for International Development, an arm of the State Department. He noted that some of the 1.
NEWS
July 24, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton defended his Administration's role in Rwanda on Saturday, dismissing criticism that the slow response of the United States and other Western nations had worsened the human catastrophe now unfolding in refugee camps along the Zaire-Rwanda border. Clinton told reporters in Hot Springs, Ark., where he was attending his 30-year high school reunion, that he had done "all I knew to do" to help the Rwandans, who have fled their homeland during a vicious civil war.
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