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United States Rwanda

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NEWS
June 8, 1998 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. military forces completed the evacuation of Americans from the beleaguered capital of Eritrea on Sunday as a top U.S. diplomat left Africa with the fighting between Eritrea and neighboring Ethiopia still out of control. Assistant Secretary of State Susan E. Rice departed Burkina Faso, where African leaders endorsed a proposed cease-fire agreement that U.S. officials hope will end the bombing raids and border skirmishes of recent days.
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NEWS
June 23, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A divided Security Council, wary of making things worse yet desperate to end the horror, authorized France on Wednesday to lead a military force into Rwanda to stop the massacres that have left several hundred thousand civilians dead in the midst of a tribal war. In Paris, Defense Minister Francois Leotard said the first few hundred French troops will launch "Operation Turquoise" this morning. He said France will contribute 2,000 to 2,500 troops.
OPINION
July 12, 1998 | Chris Landsberg, Chris Landsberg is deputy director of the Center for Policy Studies
The outbreak of a "hot war" between Eritrea and Ethiopia is potentially a major blow to Africa's incipient renaissance. The fighting comes at a time when South Africa's deputy president, Thabo Mbeki, is struggling to promote Afro-optimism in Africa, Washington, Bonn, London, Paris, Tokyo, Stockholm, Beijing and elsewhere.
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With air raids halted and ground fighting evidently stalemated, U.S. diplomats have decided to take another stab at persuading Eritrea and Ethiopia to end their heated border war and embrace a U.S.-Rwandan plan to settle differences by arbitration. A group of U.S. diplomats was en route to this Ethiopian capital on Wednesday "to see if they can pry things off dead center," said a diplomatic source. They might later travel to Asmara, the Eritrean capital, one official said.
NEWS
December 5, 1986 | Associated Press
The government of Rwanda will try in absentia an American accused of the machete murder of gorilla expert Dian Fossey, a U.S. Embassy spokeswoman said Thursday. Kathleen Tormey said the trial of Wayne Richard McGuire will begin Dec. 11 in Ruhengeri, 40 miles northwest of Kigali, the capital. "The embassy is observing the trial, but we have nothing to do with the defense," she said in a telephone interview from Kigali. Fossey, 53, an American, was found hacked to death Dec.
NATIONAL
December 16, 2007 | Charles Piller, Times Staff Writer
Teboho mahate was shivering. He had trouble keeping his balance. He couldn't talk, and he had bitten his tongue. A seizure. "Any pain anywhere?" asked Dr. Jennifer Furin. Teboho, 14, held his head. Furin looked into his eyes, checking for dilated pupils. She turned him on his side and, in English along with a few words in this nation's native Sesotho, told him to lie in a fetal position. He barely quivered as she slipped in a needle for a spinal tap. The diagnosis: life-threatening meningitis.
NEWS
May 31, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The war that has pitted Africa's oldest nation against its newest has become a perplexing study of a minor dispute gone awry. The conflict between Ethiopia and its young neighbor, Eritrea, initially was triggered by an argument over their poorly demarcated and largely uninhabited 620-mile border. But analysts say it has spun out of control for the simple reason that the squabble over land opened the door to hostilities over other issues.
NEWS
January 12, 1995 | LOUISE YARNALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In her 11-year nursing career, Lea Svedeen has tended to abused inner-city children, hospice patients waiting to die and accident victims who sometimes arrived at a rural Sierra hospital emergency room before the doctor did. But these challenges only served as a prelude to the task she took on this summer: Treating victims of the Rwandan civil war.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | GABRIELLE GLASER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It is peaceful in the seminary, as it was through times of partition, before the Communists and after they fell, and when rigid economics was left behind on the bumpy road to a free market. The only sounds reaching the office are the gentle swish of long black robes as priests glide across the marble floor in sandals, and the chirping of swallows that inhabit lush inner courtyards thick with ferns, red petunias and lavender geraniums.
NEWS
April 25, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ignoring international appeals for mercy, including a clemency plea from Pope John Paul II, the Rwandan government on Friday executed 22 people convicted of crimes in connection with the 1994 genocide that killed more than 800,000 people in this country. While 18 of the 22 were publicly put to death in four provincial towns where major massacres were committed, the condemned in Kigali faced a firing squad at a red clay soccer field.
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