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February 28, 1997 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The nation's schools received an upbeat report card in math Thursday, but the bad news continued for California as its fourth-graders lagged behind their peers in 40 states and came out ahead of only those in Mississippi. California eighth-graders performed somewhat better but still ranked behind students in 32 states in the 1996 National Assessment of Educational Progress, an arm of the federal government that monitors academic achievement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2012 | By Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
The parents of two USC graduate students slain near the campus last month have filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the university, saying the school misled them when it claimed that it ranks among the safest in the nation. Ming Qu and Ying Wu, both 23-year-old electronic engineering students from China, were fatally shot April 11 while sitting in a parked BMW in the 2700 block of Raymond Avenue. No arrests have been made, but Los Angeles police say they believe the killings were the result of a robbery gone wrong.
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NEWS
December 25, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Advocates of religious rights quickly tick off the examples. In St. Louis, "a fourth-grader was put in detention three times for whispering a prayer before eating his meal," one said. Another cited a Pennsylvania case in which a "student's lunch box was confiscated because it included a note that said: 'Jesus loves you.'
NEWS
December 22, 2001 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
If history is any guide, the Bush administration will face stiff resistance as it pushes states to carry out the ambitious education reforms passed by Congress this week. The bill calls for annual math and reading testing for all third- through eighth-graders, but its first test will be a political one, said Rep. George Miller (D-Martinez). "You need to be a tough cop on the beat to enforce what Congress says it wants states to do," Miller said Friday.
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After decades in which many of the best science and math classes were offered in elite private and suburban schools and catered only to highly motivated children with extraordinary IQs, a new trend is emerging. In a growing number of schools, teachers are experimenting with new approaches and materials, turning average and even below-average students into budding young scientists and mathematicians.
NEWS
June 27, 1990 | ROBERT W. WELKOS and JOEL SAPPELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Emerging from years of internal strife and public scandal, the Scientology movement has embarked on a sweeping and sophisticated campaign to gain new influence in America. The goal is to refurbish the tarnished image of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard and elevate him to the ranks of history's great humanitarians and thinkers. By so doing, the church hopes to broaden the acceptability of Hubbard's Scientology teachings and attract millions of new members.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1988 | Associated Press
American high school students have an alarming deficiency of economic knowledge, according to a survey that revealed two-thirds didn't understand profits and more than half couldn't supply a definition for demand. Economic education is "not in the kind of shape we want it to be," former Federal Reserve Board Chairman Paul A. Volcker said Wednesday at a news conference sponsored by the Joint Council on Economic Education, a nonprofit coalition that underwrote the survey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as the United States is launching a war on scientific illiteracy, the Soviet Union is also trying to reform science and math education--but in almost exactly the opposite direction. At a meeting Friday at Cal State Long Beach, a leader of the Soviet reform movement told U.S. educators that the Soviet system fails to educate the best and brightest science and math students. Unlike the U.S.
NEWS
December 26, 1995 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One recent morning, Ann Viar spotted Lamar Alexander strolling down her street, knocking on doors. She turned the radio up loud and retreated to her backyard. It wasn't so much that Viar is a Democrat and Alexander, the former governor of Tennessee, aspires to the Republican presidential nomination.
NEWS
March 4, 1997 | From Associated Press
Kids who have a beef with their school menu are getting a new alternative with the government's blessings: yogurt for lunch. Over strenuous objections of the cattle industry, the Agriculture Department has decided to allow yogurt as a meat substitute in the nation's school lunchrooms. Child-care providers and the food industry have been clamoring for the change for at least 15 years.
NEWS
December 11, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday added a new uncertainty to the debate over student-led prayers at public school events, as the justices let stand a Jacksonville, Fla., school board policy that allows high school seniors to elect a fellow student to deliver a "message" at graduation ceremonies. After the Supreme Court in 1992 struck down school-sponsored prayers at graduation ceremonies, Jacksonville adopted a policy that allowed students, rather than school officials, to decide the issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2001 | JOE MATHEWS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the forthcoming documentary "The First Year," rookie Los Angeles teacher Nate Monley tries to reach Juan, a fifth-grader who gives the camera a series of chilling looks. When a guest speaker to the classroom talks of violence, Juan, whose mother died when he was little, smiles. When the student is caught tagging a bathroom, he is remorseless. After Monley showers him with extra attention, Juan responds by bringing in a picture of a rat on a toilet. The rat is labeled: "Mr. Monley."
NEWS
August 3, 2001 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Despite a decade of progress in mathematics, only about one in four students in the fourth and eighth grades demonstrates a solid grasp of math topics normally taught in those grades, new data released Thursday show. Moreover, the "achievement gap" in math proficiency is widening between white and Asian American students on one hand and their black and Latino counterparts on the other, according to results of a test known as the "nation's report card."
NEWS
July 24, 2001 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
After lying low through most of the legislative debate on President Bush's bid to reform U.S. schools, the education establishment's most powerful organizations are now agitating against central elements of the measure's testing and school accountability provisions.
NEWS
June 16, 2001 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The back-patting is over. Now the details await. The Senate's overwhelming passage this week of a landmark education bill raised nearly as many questions as it answered. The legislation designed to close the achievement gap between haves and have-nots in the nation's public schools came with a gap of its own: money. At an estimated annual cost of more than $33 billion, the programs authorized by Thursday's 91-8 vote tally far more than the $19.1 billion requested by President Bush.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For weeks, lawmakers have wrestled with one of the toughest questions in their effort to produce an education reform bill: how to define a failing school. On Thursday, Senate negotiators from both major parties announced their answer as they unveiled a new version of the education bill and began a long-awaited floor debate on one of President Bush's priorities.
NEWS
December 26, 1991 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Nine-year-old Juan Carlos Osorio considers Christopher Columbus a hero for "discovering America" and displaying great courage. "If it was true the world was square, he would have died. He would have fallen off the ocean and into the sky," the fourth-grader said. On the other hand, he also knows that the famous explorer took American Indians as slaves and that they contracted devastating diseases from the crews of Columbus' ships.
NEWS
September 2, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The Food and Drug Administration confirmed Friday that it has detected low levels of dioxin in milk, attributing the presence of the highly toxic substance to the process used to manufacture paper milk cartons. The FDA and the American Paper Institute, which represents the paper industry, said that the nation's major paper mills are changing their manufacturing techniques to further reduce dioxin to levels that would be virtually undetectable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2001
Groups representing school planners and architects are calling for renewed private and public investment in the nation's school buildings. Citing studies that show a strong relationship between school design and student performance, the Council of Educational Facility Planners International and the American Institute of Architects issued a six-point "call to action."
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | AARON ZITNER and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush administration on Thursday backed away from a plan to end mandatory testing for illness-causing salmonella in hamburger served in school lunches, only hours after the proposed change became widely known. Industry groups had lobbied to ease the zero-tolerance policy for salmonella, saying it was costly and unnecessary. A U.S.
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