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NEWS
June 23, 1999 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California and other states would be free to shed federal controls on school spending in exchange for signing a five-year agreement to improve student achievement under legislation announced Tuesday by Republican leaders in Congress. The plan to create "charter states"--stealing a page from the popular concept of regulation-free charter schools--is the GOP's answer to President Clinton's call earlier this year to reshape the federal role in education.
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NEWS
December 10, 2000 | From Associated Press
President Clinton on Saturday sought to prod Congress to resolve the budget battle and approve billions of new federal dollars for schools, saying education is essential to continuing economic growth. "We must not take our economic strength for granted," he said in his weekly radio address, which for the second week in a row focused on an education spending package.
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NEWS
March 12, 1999 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress passed bipartisan legislation Thursday aimed at showing its support for education--deemed one of the top priorities of American voters--and at demonstrating that Republicans and Democrats can work together in the wake of last month's impeachment trial. House passage of the so-called ed-flex bill, designed to provide more flexibility for local school districts in using federal education grants, came on an overwhelming 330-90 vote.
NEWS
February 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
Offering a lesson plan for failing schools, President Clinton urged Congress on Saturday to vote $250 million to help states radically improve troubled public schools or shut them down and start over. Critical Republicans quickly countered with their own formulas for improving education. Clinton also offered the option of permitting a student at a "chronically failing" public school to transfer to a public school with a better record of achievement.
NEWS
March 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Republican Gov. Edward T. Schafer of North Dakota, in the weekly GOP radio address, praised a congressional move to free states from some restrictions on federal education while criticizing what he said were President Clinton's attempts to "hijack" the measure. The governor lauded the so-called ed-flex bills, approved Thursday with bipartisan support in both the House and Senate, for increasing states' flexibility in spending federal education money.
NEWS
February 2, 1998 | JONATHAN PETERSON and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a drive to boost Latinos' performance in the classroom and reverse an extraordinarily high dropout rate, the Clinton administration will unveil a set of proposals today to strengthen schools that have large numbers of Latino students. The White House's Hispanic Education Action Plan will be sent to Capitol Hill as part of a $1.73-trillion budget, scheduled for release today, that would produce a fiscal surplus for the first time since 1969.
NEWS
April 24, 1998 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Openly defying a veto threat, the Senate passed sweeping legislation Thursday that would give parents a new tax break for school expenses and states vast new authority to decide how to spend federal education money. It also would permanently block President Clinton's plan to offer national math and science tests.
NEWS
April 22, 1998 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dealing a substantial blow to President Clinton's education agenda, the Senate on Tuesday rejected a White House proposal to provide more than $3 billion in federal subsidies over five years to help renovate crumbling school buildings around the country. In another snub to the administration and its Democrat allies, the Republican-controlled Senate shot down a separate Clinton-backed proposal to help finance the recruitment of an additional 100,000 teachers in an effort to reduce class size.
NEWS
February 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
Offering a lesson plan for failing schools, President Clinton urged Congress on Saturday to vote $250 million to help states radically improve troubled public schools or shut them down and start over. Critical Republicans quickly countered with their own formulas for improving education. Clinton also offered the option of permitting a student at a "chronically failing" public school to transfer to a public school with a better record of achievement.
NEWS
January 7, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton is expected to unveil a plan today to triple, to $600 million, federal spending on the government's primary after-school program. Clinton is disclosing the plan as part of a series of announcements leading up to his planned presentation this month of the State of the Union address and, in early February, his budget. The program is one of the more popular, and less controversial, education programs supported by Clinton.
NEWS
November 15, 1999 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly a century there has been a direct connection between how many trees are chopped down in federal forests and how much money is spent on students in surrounding school districts. As timber cutting has dramatically declined in recent years, that formula has wreaked havoc on rural school budgets and sparked a passionate debate on whether logs and lesson plans should have anything to do with each other. Bailout legislation passed this month in the U.S.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | RICHARD T. COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House, in a rare display of bipartisan agreement on education, voted overwhelmingly Thursday to approve the strongest requirements for higher standards and accountability ever imposed by the federal government on local schools serving poor and disadvantaged students.
NEWS
July 21, 1999 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Tuesday approved a measure that would allow school districts to choose how to spend their part of $2 billion in federal education funds--on reducing class size or improving teacher quality. Despite heavy lobbying by the White House, 24 Democrats broke ranks to join Republicans in backing the measure after a major debate over whether it is more important to decrease the student-teacher ratio or boost the quality of teachers in the classroom.
NEWS
July 13, 1999 | BLAIR GOLSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drug czar Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey will outline proposed legislation today to overhaul the way federal, state and local governments combat drug abuse in schools, targeting federal anti-drug money at campuses that need it most.
NEWS
June 23, 1999 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California and other states would be free to shed federal controls on school spending in exchange for signing a five-year agreement to improve student achievement under legislation announced Tuesday by Republican leaders in Congress. The plan to create "charter states"--stealing a page from the popular concept of regulation-free charter schools--is the GOP's answer to President Clinton's call earlier this year to reshape the federal role in education.
NEWS
March 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Republican Gov. Edward T. Schafer of North Dakota, in the weekly GOP radio address, praised a congressional move to free states from some restrictions on federal education while criticizing what he said were President Clinton's attempts to "hijack" the measure. The governor lauded the so-called ed-flex bills, approved Thursday with bipartisan support in both the House and Senate, for increasing states' flexibility in spending federal education money.
NEWS
March 15, 1997 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The Clinton administration on Friday proposed spending $5 billion to speed the repair of rundown schools and the construction of new ones, especially in urban areas such as Los Angeles struggling to cope with record enrollments. The money would not be spent directly on bricks and mortar, which caused some school officials to grumble.
NEWS
December 11, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is moving to eliminate 33 programs that provide money to local school systems for a variety of special projects, including reading instruction and bilingual vocational courses, Administration officials say. The money would be given instead to Education Secretary Richard W. Riley for discretionary use, particularly for distribution to poorer school districts suffering severe problems.
NEWS
March 12, 1999 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress passed bipartisan legislation Thursday aimed at showing its support for education--deemed one of the top priorities of American voters--and at demonstrating that Republicans and Democrats can work together in the wake of last month's impeachment trial. House passage of the so-called ed-flex bill, designed to provide more flexibility for local school districts in using federal education grants, came on an overwhelming 330-90 vote.
NEWS
January 7, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton is expected to unveil a plan today to triple, to $600 million, federal spending on the government's primary after-school program. Clinton is disclosing the plan as part of a series of announcements leading up to his planned presentation this month of the State of the Union address and, in early February, his budget. The program is one of the more popular, and less controversial, education programs supported by Clinton.
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