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NEWS
November 2, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This year's most significant shift in education law may take place this week, not at the ballot box on Tuesday but at the Supreme Court today. In recent years, advocates of "school choice" have been pressing for the legal right to use public money to pay for private and parochial schooling.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2001 | From Times staff and wire reports
A coalition of educational organizations has launched a national campaign to raise federal funding for education. The 100-member organization, the Committee to Raise Education Funding, wants the Bush administration to raise federal support from the current level of 2 cents on the dollar to 5 cents within five years.
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NEWS
September 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
After a quiet Martha's Vineyard vacation, President Clinton on Monday stepped back into politics as usual by urging congressional Republicans to pass his education agenda. Clinton focused on legislation to add 100,000 teachers nationwide as a way to reduce class sizes in early grades and build or modernize 5,000 schools.
NEWS
December 3, 2000 | From Reuters
President Clinton opened the postelection battle over the long overdue federal budget, calling Saturday for Republican leaders to stop blocking a proposed $7.9-billion increase in school funding. Congress convenes this week for a lame-duck session that faces a daunting array of political and legislative challenges after an election that has yet to produce a president.
NEWS
December 3, 2000 | From Reuters
President Clinton opened the postelection battle over the long overdue federal budget, calling Saturday for Republican leaders to stop blocking a proposed $7.9-billion increase in school funding. Congress convenes this week for a lame-duck session that faces a daunting array of political and legislative challenges after an election that has yet to produce a president.
NEWS
March 15, 1997 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The Clinton administration on Friday proposed spending $5 billion to speed the repair of rundown schools and the construction of new ones, especially in urban areas such as Los Angeles struggling to cope with record enrollments. The money would not be spent directly on bricks and mortar, which caused some school officials to grumble.
NEWS
February 6, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 2,000 school boards across the country, determined to hold President Clinton to his promises to improve education, Friday called on the federal government to shift more money from the Pentagon budget to domestic needs.
NEWS
December 11, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is moving to eliminate 33 programs that provide money to local school systems for a variety of special projects, including reading instruction and bilingual vocational courses, Administration officials say. The money would be given instead to Education Secretary Richard W. Riley for discretionary use, particularly for distribution to poorer school districts suffering severe problems.
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | Associated Press
Public schooling is expected to cost $4,810 per student this year, a figure that has risen by more than $2,000 since 1980, the Education Department reported Tuesday. "The financial investment we are making in our children's education is immense. . . . We must produce better results for our investment, for our young people, and for the future of our nation," Education Secretary William J. Bennett said in releasing his department's back-to-school report.
NEWS
January 12, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If spending a bundle of money would make for an exemplary school system, the Kansas City district should be among the nation's best. Since 1986, the state of Missouri has spent $1.3 billion to upgrade the Kansas City schools. Thanks to this extraordinary infusion of state aid, the city's schools spend three times more per student than the state average.
NEWS
October 23, 2000 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the public's eye trained on the campaign for president, hostilities in the Middle East and the Subway Series in New York, scant attention is being paid to the extraordinary way Congress is ending this year's session: Very, very slowly.
NEWS
March 4, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Public schools must pay for one-on-one nursing care in class for a severely disabled child, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday, siding with parents in a closely watched battle over who will bear the high cost of special education. "Congress intended to open the door of public education" to children with severe disabilities, regardless of the cost, the justices said.
NEWS
November 23, 1998 | LIZ SEYMOUR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anxious to entice their next generation of customers, corporations are reaching ever deeper into the daily routine of the nation's public schools. Just look around a local campus. Candy logos in the cafeteria, soft-drink signs on the football field, posters for breakfast cereal. Schools need money for everything from music lessons to classroom supplies, and more and more, corporations are happy to fill the void--for a price.
NEWS
November 2, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This year's most significant shift in education law may take place this week, not at the ballot box on Tuesday but at the Supreme Court today. In recent years, advocates of "school choice" have been pressing for the legal right to use public money to pay for private and parochial schooling.
NEWS
September 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
After a quiet Martha's Vineyard vacation, President Clinton on Monday stepped back into politics as usual by urging congressional Republicans to pass his education agenda. Clinton focused on legislation to add 100,000 teachers nationwide as a way to reduce class sizes in early grades and build or modernize 5,000 schools.
NEWS
March 15, 1997 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The Clinton administration on Friday proposed spending $5 billion to speed the repair of rundown schools and the construction of new ones, especially in urban areas such as Los Angeles struggling to cope with record enrollments. The money would not be spent directly on bricks and mortar, which caused some school officials to grumble.
NEWS
August 2, 1994
Is more money the only way to achieve high-quality schools? An analysis of school districts nationwide found many are producing high-achieving students at low cost. The study by American Demographics magazine found that student performance in other districts lags despite generous school budgets. Dollars-and-cents analyses of school performance are rising as employers raise doubts about the quality of graduates and taxpayers wonder if money is being handled wisely.
NEWS
February 6, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 2,000 school boards across the country, determined to hold President Clinton to his promises to improve education, Friday called on the federal government to shift more money from the Pentagon budget to domestic needs.
NEWS
January 12, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If spending a bundle of money would make for an exemplary school system, the Kansas City district should be among the nation's best. Since 1986, the state of Missouri has spent $1.3 billion to upgrade the Kansas City schools. Thanks to this extraordinary infusion of state aid, the city's schools spend three times more per student than the state average.
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