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BUSINESS
April 5, 1988 | United Press International
Japanese industrial machinery manufacturers Monday denied a claim by the American plastics industry that rising imports of injection molding machines are threatening the United States' national security. The denial followed the Jan. 11 filing of a petition against Japanese and European manufacturers by the Society of the Plastics Industry under section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962.
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NEWS
April 13, 2002 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four miles out in the Atlantic Ocean, 6-foot waves are hammering the pilot boat, slathering its windshield in foam and rocking it like a roller coaster car. Petty Officer 2nd Class Jeremy Zimmer of the U.S. Coast Guard is about to go to work, stepping into the unknown with only a pistol to protect himself. The launch draws alongside Stena Clipper, a freighter arriving from the Dominican Republic. A rope ladder dangles down 25 feet to the sea from an open hatch in the rusting hull.
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NEWS
September 16, 2001
These are the names of the terrorists' victims identified so far Dead World Trade Center David Berry Pamela Boyce Daniel Brethel Andrew Brunn Stephen Colaio Peter Corroll Robert Cruikshank Joyce Cummings Robert Curatolo Jack D'Ambrosio Andrew Desperito William Feehan Julio Fernandez Peter Ganci Tommy Hannafin Timothy Haskell George Howard Walter Hynes John Iskyan Rev. Mychal Judge Mcheffey Keith John Keohane Eugene Lazar Joseph Livera Michael McCabe Robert G.
NEWS
March 30, 2002 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When FBI and immigration agents arrested Zacarias Moussaoui at his motel in suburban Minneapolis on Aug. 16, they suspected he might be a potential airline hijacker. He wanted to fly "the Big Bird," he'd said. He was in a hurry to learn. And despite more than 50 hours at the controls, he couldn't even solo a single-engine Cessna. But the only direct evidence of his breaking the law were technical violations of his visa. More than seven months later, U.S.
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An ex-Army sergeant charged in one of the most significant espionage schemes ever uncovered appeared in court in Tampa, Fla., on Friday, while federal agents there searched three sites for top-secret documents that the former soldier allegedly hoped to sell to foreign agents.
NEWS
June 29, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once again, the United States and Japan have gone to the brink in a trade dispute and, at the last gasping moment, tiptoed back from it. Once again, Washington and Tokyo have managed to avoid letting commercial frictions undermine the essential bargain forged between them during the Cold War--that the United States would help guarantee Japan's security in exchange for the right to keep troops on Japanese soil. Now the question is whether that relationship can last--and for how long.
NEWS
April 1, 1991 | From Associated Press
The undetected flight of a Soviet-built MIG from Cuba to Key West, Fla., exposed gaps in the nation's southern air defense that military officials say may be all but impossible to plug. The March 20 incident has prompted an internal investigation by NORAD, the U.S.-Canadian command charged with protecting North American airspace, spokesman Maj. John Niemann said.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2001 | RONALD D. WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As workplace violence and international terrorism have raised lethal threats in American offices, stores and factories, one major response by businesses even before the Sept. 11 attacks has been to build up a vast army of 745,000 private security guards.
SPORTS
September 12, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Security plans for the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, which open five months from now, must be--and will be--reconsidered in the wake of terrorist strikes Tuesday on American soil, government and Olympic officials said. The Games open Feb. 8, and Utah Gov. Mike Leavitt pledged Tuesday that the Olympics "will go forward as planned."
NEWS
September 18, 2001 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walter Pilipiak is an insurance broker who walked down 89 flights of stairs in a World Trade Center tower last week and rode up 22 stories Monday morning to borrowed office space in a glass tower in midtown Manhattan. He is back at work, this lucky president of a small firm whose employees all made it out of that burning tower.
NEWS
March 15, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Making perhaps the most sensitive stop of his Middle East tour, Vice President Dick Cheney on Thursday courted a Yemeni government anxious about taking up a role in the war on terrorism. Meanwhile, new details emerged about U.S. military assistance to the Arabian Peninsula state. The vice president spent less than two hours in Yemen's capital, Sana, talking with President Ali Abdullah Saleh before leaving for Salalah, Oman. Cheney flew on a U.S.
NEWS
March 10, 2002 | JOSH MEYER and ERIC LICHTBLAU and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Six months after the Sept. 11 skyjackings, the Justice Department is planning to send specially trained federal counterterrorism prosecutors to Europe to help press charges against the dozens of suspects taken into custody in recent months. Officials said they hope to reinvigorate law enforcement and intelligence gathering efforts that have achieved major success on some fronts--most notably by preventing numerous attacks against U.S.
NEWS
March 10, 2002
One new name, Thomas McCann, was added in recent days to the list of confirmed dead in the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. This updates accounts of the confirmed dead that have appeared in The Times each Sunday since Sept. 11. The number of people unaccounted for, according to New York City officials, is now believed to be 158.
NEWS
March 3, 2002 | From the Washington Post
Alarmed by growing hints of Al Qaeda's progress toward obtaining a nuclear or radiological weapon, the Bush administration has deployed hundreds of sophisticated sensors since November to U.S. borders, overseas facilities and choke points around Washington. Officials have placed the Delta Force, the nation's elite commando unit, on a new standby alert to seize control of nuclear materials that the sensors may detect.
NEWS
February 17, 2002
For the first time since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, no new names were added to the weekly list of confirmed dead published each Sunday in The Times. The Associated Press reported Friday that 194 people are still listed as missing from the attacks.
NEWS
February 8, 2002 | PAUL WATSON and SIDHARTHA BARUA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A dingy, overcrowded cellblock in the bowels of New Delhi's Tihar jail was the perfect spot for a merger between militant Islam and the Indian mafia. Ahmad Omar Sayed Sheikh, a chess-playing Islamic radical, made common cause with Aftab Ansari, an ambitious Calcutta gangster, when they did time together behind Tihar's high walls in the late 1990s, according to Indian police investigators.
NEWS
December 22, 2001 | From the Washington Post
The ring of Jersey barriers that has surrounded the Washington Monument since 1998 would be replaced by walled, sunken walkways and visitors would enter the obelisk through a new underground tunnel under a security plan unanimously endorsed by the Commission of Fine Arts. The proposal, the winning entry in a design contest sponsored by the National Park Service, has not received congressional funding, and Park Service officials said they do not have an estimate on what it would cost.
NEWS
October 14, 2001 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Though it is difficult to turn anthrax into a weapon of mass destruction, it is quite easy to grow the bacteria in a lab and distribute small quantities piecemeal, even through the mail, experts said Saturday. "Growing this organism is no problem," said Norman Cheville, dean of Iowa State University's School of Veterinary Medicine. "It grows readily. It grows overnight."
NEWS
February 6, 2002 | PETER H. KING and GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On the floor of Montana's Bitterroot Valley, so far, far away from lower Manhattan, Jane Ellis finds herself on the front lines of a war she never contemplated, trying to prepare for attacks she can barely imagine. Ellis directs the county Office of Emergency Management in Missoula. On a fine, crisp day, she showed a visitor around her piece of the American homeland, pointing out possible terrorist targets: the shopping mall and public waterworks, government buildings and chemical storehouses.
NEWS
February 1, 2002 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A confidential intelligence report issued Thursday indicates that Osama bin Laden's operatives displayed a keen interest in exploiting vulnerabilities in security at sensitive U.S. facilities, and FBI Director Robert Mueller said he believes that Al Qaeda-trained agents are still at large in the United States. The intelligence report, reviewed by The Times, revealed that U.S.
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