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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1986
The confirmation of admitted drug-abuser, William Rehnquist, must certainly point out to our crusading First Family how difficult it is, even for the United States Senate, to "Just Say No." KEVIN P. SMITH Newbury Park
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NATIONAL
December 10, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - The Senate on Tuesday confirmed Patricia Millett for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and Rep. Melvin Watt (D-N.C.) to lead the Federal Housing Finance Agency, the first nominees approved since the filibuster rules were changed. Millett and Watt were among several high-profile nominees whose confirmation had been delayed for months because of Republican threats to filibuster, meaning their supporters needed 60 votes rather than a mere majority.
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NEWS
July 7, 1992 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
U. S. Sen. John Seymour toured three of California's rich farming valleys Monday to tout his work in the Senate for farmers and to receive the blessings of the state's biggest agricultural groups for election Nov. 3. At the same time, the Orange County Republican attacked his Democratic opponent, Dianne Feinstein, on farm, water and environmental issues, claiming that her positions would cost the state billions in farm income and thousands of jobs.
NEWS
November 21, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - In a historic move, Democrats in the Senate on Thursday voted to eliminate the use of the filibuster as a tool to block presidential appointments, upending a decades-old precedent that gave the minority party unique leverage on nominations. After threatening to change the rules several times this year, the Democratic majority pulled the trigger on the so-called nuclear option after a series of procedural maneuvers that played out before a packed chamber. It would allow a president's nominees, except for seats on the Supreme Court, to be confirmed by a simple majority, rather than the 60-vote threshold that had become the norm.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | From a Times Staff Writer
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and others are lobbying for censure of President Clinton after his presumed acquittal of the impeachment charges against him.
NEWS
October 31, 1998 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Friday campaigned for Social Security and for Rep. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.), who is trying to unseat Republican Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato in what has become the nation's most expensive and perhaps nastiest Senate race. The polls show D'Amato is slipping in his bid for a fourth term. "We shouldn't take the money and run," the president told senior citizens in a parish basement in Queens. "We ought to save Social Security before we throw this money away. . . .
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Mark Z. Barabak
CODY, Wyo.--Alan Simpson has spent the better part of two years flying around the country ticking people off, though that's putting it more politely than the former Wyoming senator does. Simpson is the Republican half of the Simpson-Bowles duo (Erskine being the Democrat) that produced a 2010 deficit reduction plan that gored just about every sacred cow in Washington before succumbing to a scarcely lamented death. He continues to campaign around the country for the controversial recipe of tax hikes, spending cuts and entitlement reforms.
NATIONAL
September 20, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli and Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - By approving a government spending bill that would halt money for President Obama's healthcare law, the House on Friday provoked a confrontation with the Senate, which is likely to engage in a contentious debate leaving little time to avert a government shutdown. After having voted about 40 times to curtail or repeal outright the 3-year-old Affordable Care Act only to see the Senate either dismiss or ignore the proposals, House Republicans celebrated the latest measure's approval.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, claiming Republicans have engaged in unprecedented obstruction of presidential nominations, signaled Thursday that he would proceed with long-threatened changes to Senate rules to limit use of the filibuster. In remarks on the Senate floor, the Nevada Democrat called it a “disturbing trend” that Republicans have blocked or delayed some of President Obama's appointees even when their qualifications are not in doubt, bogging them down “with unreasonable demands.” He cited an earlier filibuster of Chuck Hagel to be Defense secretary and continued delays in the confirmation of Obama's picks to lead the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Labor Department and Environmental Protection Agency, as well as appointments to the National Labor Relations Board.
NEWS
October 31, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- Four new U.S. senators have taken the oath of office since the start of the 113th Congress but only one, Cory Booker, New Jersey's new junior senator, has attracted much attention. Vice President Joe Biden administered the oath to the former Newark mayor on Thursday, drawing robust applause from the unusually packed galleries of the Senate chamber. More than two dozen fellow Democrats were on hand to welcome Booker to their ranks, along with only three Republicans, including South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott, the only other African American in the Senate.
NEWS
October 31, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- Four new U.S. senators have taken the oath of office since the start of the 113th Congress but only one, Cory Booker, New Jersey's new junior senator, has attracted much attention. Vice President Joe Biden administered the oath to the former Newark mayor on Thursday, drawing robust applause from the unusually packed galleries of the Senate chamber. More than two dozen fellow Democrats were on hand to welcome Booker to their ranks, along with only three Republicans, including South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott, the only other African American in the Senate.
OPINION
October 8, 2013 | By Olympia Snowe
This is the first year in more than four decades that I haven't been in the legislative branch of government. During that span, I've witnessed government's greatest potential as well as its calamitous capacity for dysfunction. Unfortunately, the latter is now drastically outweighing the former. When I got my start, in the Maine House of Representatives in 1973, I found that politics and public life were positive and constructive endeavors. Once the elections were over, we put campaigns and party labels behind us to enact laws that genuinely improved the lives of the citizens of our state.
NATIONAL
September 26, 2013 | By David Horsey
Ted Cruz may not have killed Obamacare with his 21-hour speech on the Senate floor this week. He may not have endeared himself to most of his Republican colleagues, who think his grandstanding wasted precious time. He may not have done anything good for the country, given that his extended harangue has made a government shutdown more likely. But he probably did something good for one person: Ted Cruz.  The freshman Republican senator from Texas is an upstart, a renegade and a destructive force -- not the kind of personality that generally does well in the tradition-bound United States Senate.
NATIONAL
September 20, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli and Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - By approving a government spending bill that would halt money for President Obama's healthcare law, the House on Friday provoked a confrontation with the Senate, which is likely to engage in a contentious debate leaving little time to avert a government shutdown. After having voted about 40 times to curtail or repeal outright the 3-year-old Affordable Care Act only to see the Senate either dismiss or ignore the proposals, House Republicans celebrated the latest measure's approval.
WORLD
September 1, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Several key Republican senators strongly indicated Sunday that they will not vote to give President Obama authorization for a missile attack on Syria unless the White House first lays out “a strategy and a plan” to stop the Bashar Assad regime from ever again using chemical weapons. The senators, led by John McCain of Arizona, also signaled that they will use Obama's offer to seek congressional approval before any attack on Syria to press the administration and the Pentagon to make sure that a U.S. reprisal is a clear warning to Assad that he risks losing his hold over the war-torn country if any more chemical attacks are unleashed upon the Syrian people.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, claiming Republicans have engaged in unprecedented obstruction of presidential nominations, signaled Thursday that he would proceed with long-threatened changes to Senate rules to limit use of the filibuster. In remarks on the Senate floor, the Nevada Democrat called it a “disturbing trend” that Republicans have blocked or delayed some of President Obama's appointees even when their qualifications are not in doubt, bogging them down “with unreasonable demands.” He cited an earlier filibuster of Chuck Hagel to be Defense secretary and continued delays in the confirmation of Obama's picks to lead the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Labor Department and Environmental Protection Agency, as well as appointments to the National Labor Relations Board.
WORLD
February 10, 2006 | Jonathan Peterson, Times Staff Writer
Roland E. Arnall is heading for Amsterdam. The Southern California mortgage-lending magnate was confirmed late Wednesday as U.S. ambassador to the Netherlands, 16 days after his Ameriquest Mortgage Co. agreed to pay $325 million to settle allegations of unfair lending practices by regulators in 49 states and the District of Columbia. The uncontested Senate voice vote brought a peaceful end to a divisive, three-month confirmation process, in which Democrats led by Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes (D-Md.
WORLD
September 1, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Several key Republican senators strongly indicated Sunday that they will not vote to give President Obama authorization for a missile attack on Syria unless the White House first lays out “a strategy and a plan” to stop the Bashar Assad regime from ever again using chemical weapons. The senators, led by John McCain of Arizona, also signaled that they will use Obama's offer to seek congressional approval before any attack on Syria to press the administration and the Pentagon to make sure that a U.S. reprisal is a clear warning to Assad that he risks losing his hold over the war-torn country if any more chemical attacks are unleashed upon the Syrian people.
NATIONAL
July 11, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Fed up with Republican efforts to block confirmation of President Obama's appointees, Democrats threatened Thursday to limit use of the filibuster, a drastic maneuver that would end an age-old Senate tradition and could inflame tensions between the two parties. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid set the stage for a showdown next week, scheduling votes on seven stalled nominations that require 60 votes to advance under a filibuster. If those votes fail, Reid vowed that Democrats would alter Senate rules on executive branch nominations to allow them to pass on majority votes.
NEWS
June 8, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli and Tina Susman
Cory Booker, who built a national profile for a hands-on style of leadership as mayor of New Jersey's largest city, entered the race for the state's vacant Senate seat, vowing to bring the same energy to change another city: Washington. “Too many people have come to believe that Washington, D.C. is a place where nothing can get done. Where people don't work together, don't find compromise and common ground,” the Newark mayor said. “I tell you today that I reject that attitude.
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