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July 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
Astronauts struggled with more air leaks aboard the international space station on Thursday, this time inside the newly attached portal for spacewalkers. NASA said the latest leaks were small and would not interfere with tonight's spacewalk through the new $164-million air lock. A shrill noise coming from the air lock's depressurization pump, when turned on, also will not hamper any of the activity, officials said. Space station astronaut Susan Helms complained of the noise Thursday night.
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NEWS
July 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
Astronauts struggled with more air leaks aboard the international space station on Thursday, this time inside the newly attached portal for spacewalkers. NASA said the latest leaks were small and would not interfere with tonight's spacewalk through the new $164-million air lock. A shrill noise coming from the air lock's depressurization pump, when turned on, also will not hamper any of the activity, officials said. Space station astronaut Susan Helms complained of the noise Thursday night.
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NEWS
January 29, 1986 | United Press International
Following is the text of President Reagan's speech Tuesday mourning the loss of the Challenger astronauts: Ladies and gentlemen, I planned to speak to you tonight to report on the state of the union. But the events of earlier today have led me to change those plans. Today is a day for mourning and remembering. Nancy and I are pained to the core over the tragedy of the shuttle Challenger. We know we share this pain with all of the people of our country. This is truly a national loss.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The occasion was a screening for students of an Oscar-winning documentary about the rescue of 10,000 Jewish children by the British just before World War II. On screen, Ursula Rosenfeld, now a woman in her 70s, was describing the moment she realized her happy childhood was over. Rosenfeld was one of the children whisked out of Nazi Germany in 1938 and 1939 and taken to England.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1997 | KEN WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We're all living in the future Tell you how I know I read it in the paper 15 years ago --"Living in the Future," John Prine * Stardate 9704.12: You live in a master-planned community of immaculate, landscaped housing complexes and manicured parks. Your living quarters are climate controlled, with fully integrated life-support, entertainment and food-synthesis systems. You work from home at a computer console that can send information to any point on the globe in the blink of an eye.
BOOKS
November 29, 1992 | Joel R. Reynolds, Joel R. Reynolds is a Senior Attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council in Los Angeles
"Wild birds are not in the protection of anyone." --Oliver Wendell Holmes The debate over the federal Endangered Species Act, up for reauthorization early next year, is on. Already the question is being defined as a Hobson's choice between progress or the status quo, jobs or the environment, people or wildlife. Framed in this way, endangered species protection seems a luxury that, in hard economic times, we simply can't afford.
NEWS
September 6, 1988 | ROBERT A. JONES, Times Staff Writer
The scheduled launch this fall of the space shuttle Discovery will signal the re-emergence of this country's manned space program after a 32-month hiatus. But the return of the shuttle also will confront the nation with a host of difficult questions about America's commitment to the next stages of space exploration.
NEWS
August 17, 1986 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
When James C. Fletcher was handed the reins of the battered National Aeronautics and Space Administration on May 12, he predicted it would be harder to repair the space agency itself than to fix the booster rocket that caused the Challenger tragedy. The three trying months since then have so far borne out his assessment.
NEWS
August 31, 1987 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
The guttural roar of the world's biggest solid rocket motor reverberated through the valleys of the Wasatch Mountains on Sunday, heralding the revival of the United States' moribund space program. Marking a critical milestone in the comeback of the grounded space shuttle, engineers carried out an apparently flawless captive firing of the shuttle's 126-foot-long booster rocket.
NEWS
June 11, 1986 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
Congress launched its own investigation of the Challenger accident Tuesday, lauding the just-completed probe by a blue-ribbon presidential commission as a starting place for rebuilding the United States' shattered space program. Members of the House and Senate space committees heaped effusive congratulations upon former Secretary of State William P. Rogers and former astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, who led the presidential panel's investigation.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1990 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
For many of us, the words "Mission to Mars" bring to mind the futuristic ride in Disneyland's Tomorrowland. But in a speech a year ago--on the 20th anniversary of the first Apollo landing on the moon--President George Bush, in what he called a "journey to tomorrow," proposed a real manned flight to Mars. With that speech, Bush ignited an ongoing debate about how much the nation should be spending on its space program and what its long-term goals should be.
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