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BUSINESS
September 9, 2000
* U.S. Sugar Corp. said it's eliminating nearly 10% of its work force, or 327 jobs, as part of a major reorganization due partly to falling sugar cane prices. The nation's largest producer of cane sugar said it won't lower cane production. The Clewiston, Fla.-based company will split into two units, one sugar cane and the other citrus. * Guide to Our Staff: Need to reach Business section reporters or editors? A guide to the section's staff can be found at: http://www.latimes.com/bizstaff.
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BUSINESS
September 9, 2000
* U.S. Sugar Corp. said it's eliminating nearly 10% of its work force, or 327 jobs, as part of a major reorganization due partly to falling sugar cane prices. The nation's largest producer of cane sugar said it won't lower cane production. The Clewiston, Fla.-based company will split into two units, one sugar cane and the other citrus. * Guide to Our Staff: Need to reach Business section reporters or editors? A guide to the section's staff can be found at: http://www.latimes.com/bizstaff.
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BUSINESS
December 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Sugar Fined for Environmental Violations: The record $3.75-million fine was part of a plea agreement for the company's illegal shipment and disposal of hazardous waste, federal officials in Miami said. It is the highest fine ever for hazardous waste crimes, a federal prosecutor said. Clewiston, Fla.-based U.S.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Sugar Fined for Environmental Violations: The record $3.75-million fine was part of a plea agreement for the company's illegal shipment and disposal of hazardous waste, federal officials in Miami said. It is the highest fine ever for hazardous waste crimes, a federal prosecutor said. Clewiston, Fla.-based U.S.
NATIONAL
December 15, 2008 | Richard Fausset, Fausset is a Times staff writer.
The mayor of the place that bills itself as "America's sweetest town" has learned to love the stench that wafts from the United States Sugar Corp.'s gigantic mill near the mucky banks of Lake Okeechobee. "To us," said Clewiston Mayor Mali Chamness, "it smells like money." For decades, sugar has been the main economic driver of this isolated farming city of 6,800 people. Today, however, locals fear the industry, and its attendant smells, will dissipate for good if Gov.
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