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United States Suits

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NEWS
December 15, 1989 | TRACY THOMPSON, THE WASHINGTON POST
As a child in post-World War II England, Shirley McGlade clipped a picture of movie star Jeff Chandler and put it in her wallet. That was her father, she told schoolmates--a rich American who had divorced her mother and was fighting for custody of her. "People believed me," she said. "I lived in a fantasy world."
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OPINION
October 6, 2010 | By Andres Salazar
Americans often tout the great freedoms that U.S. citizenship grants. But lately I have a hard time seeing it that way. Instead, I find myself toying with renouncing my citizenship. When it comes to my ability to spend my life with the person I love, this country has turned its back on me. I am a dual national. I was born in the United States to an American mother and a Spanish father. I grew up in Spain, although my family frequently jetted across the ocean to maintain bonds with family and friends.
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NEWS
February 14, 1993 | From Associated Press
NASA released dozens of photographs of the space shuttle Challenger's smashed crew cabin to a New York man who sued, citing the federal Freedom of Information Act, according to a published report. The 48 pictures were taken after the crew cabin was recovered from the Atlantic Ocean in 1986, the New York Times reported in today's editions. The newspaper published one of the photos showing a damaged section of the cabin's bulkhead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Environmental groups on Monday sued the U.S. Navy, claiming it has failed to perform mandatory environmental reviews of its sonar tests in coastal waters, despite evidence that such intense noise can harm whales, dolphins and other protected sea creatures.
NEWS
July 24, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, Times Staff Writer
While growing up in Bakersfield, Marco E. Lopez regularly delivered produce from his parents' food-supply business to nearby camps populated by migrant laborers. Their deplorable living conditions were striking to the Mexican-American youth, who was himself accustomed to a more middle-class life style. "I had never done farm work," Lopez recalled last week, "so those conditions made an impression."
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
The air traffic controller who tracked an Aeromexico jetliner before it collided with a private plane over Cerritos and crashed testified Tuesday that he had sought psychiatric help because he was traumatized by the tragedy in which 82 people died two years ago. "I was feeling a lot of sorrow, grief and empathy," Walter White, 37, said of the days and weeks after the accident. "I was very moved by this, and I did try to talk to someone to help me work out all that happened."
BUSINESS
April 29, 1988 | From Reuters
Federal regulators argued Thursday that a Delaware state law giving broad takeover protection to more than half of the nation's largest public companies violates the U.S. Constitution. In a friend-of-the-court brief filed in U.S. District Court in Delaware, the Securities and Exchange Commission argued that the state takeover law enacted in February frustrates the intent of federal law governing tender offers, a common method of purchasing corporate control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Invoking the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the U.S. Justice Department has sued the city of Alhambra and its Police and Fire departments, charging employment discrimination against minorities. The suit was filed after the city declined a Justice Department recommendation to revamp its personnel practices, City Manager Kevin Murphy said. The changes would have expanded city recruitment, hiring and promotion of blacks, Latinos and Asians.
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | VIRGINIA ELLIS and PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Asserting that hundreds of thousands of destitute and disabled people face imminent danger of losing their only means of support, a coalition of civil rights attorneys sued the federal government Wednesday to stop it from denying aid to legal immigrants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
An admitted cocaine trafficker being held on charges stemming from the murder of federal drug agent Enrique Camarena filed suit Friday, claiming that he has been held for 15 months in a small cell to pressure him into providing information about the slaying.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
A group of conservationists is suing the U.S. Forest Service to have it study more extensively the effect of selling 1,050 acres of pine, fir and cedar for logging in an area east of Eureka. The groups, which filed suit Tuesday in U.S. District Court, say the area near the Trinity Alps has about 330 acres designated as roadless areas.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2001 | PETER KAPLAN, REUTERS
The U.S. government will appeal a judge's dismissal of a landmark suit charging AMR Corp.'s American Airlines with using predatory tactics to drive low-cost carriers from its hub at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, the Justice Department said Tuesday. The case has been closely watched because it could settle some long-disputed questions about what constitutes fair competition in the airline industry. The government filed notice of the pending appeal with the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2001 | PETER H. KING
And so the president of the United States made his way to California this week and offered some advice. What Californians need to do, President Bush said, is quit whining about the energy mess and take action: "Energy," he said, "is a problem that requires action, not politics, not excuses, but action." Issuing $12.5 billion in bonds, pushing a dozen or so new power plants through the pipeline, launching a World War II-style conservation campaign--apparently these don't qualify as action.
NEWS
April 21, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A private Catholic university in Texas has agreed to pay $2.4 million to settle a federal lawsuit involving Latino housekeepers who contended that they were ordered to speak only English, were called "dumb Mexicans" and were physically abused by their supervisor. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission represented the 18 former housekeepers in the suit against the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2001 | STEVE CHAWKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition of environmental groups has sued the U.S. Forest Service over its management of three rivers in Los Padres National Forest, contending that plans to preserve the wilderness waterways are six years overdue. Portions of Sespe Creek and the Big Sur and Sisquoc rivers were placed under the protection of the federal Wild and Scenic Rivers Act in 1992.
NEWS
February 24, 2001 | From the Washington Post
A federal appeals court Friday found the U.S. government has mismanaged and neglected trust funds kept on behalf of Native Americans for more than a century, clearing the way for Indians to seek as much as $10 billion they say is rightfully theirs. Upholding a lower court ruling, a three-judge appellate panel declared that record-keeping has been so poor that government officials cannot say for certain how many Indians have trust fund accounts or how much money is in them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1987 | JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writer
Eighteen civilian firefighters barred from working at an Air Force plant in Palmdale for allegedly using drugs and alcohol on the job have won a 45-month fight to regain their security clearances so they can return to work, their attorney said Wednesday.
NEWS
April 4, 1987 | RONALD L. SOBLE and VICTOR HULL, Times Staff Writers
A coalition of civil rights groups filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles on Friday designed to declare unconstitutional parts of the 35-year-old McCarran-Walter immigration law and to block the deportation of eight immigrants whom the government alleges belong to a Marxist Palestinian group. Arguments on the lawsuit were scheduled to be heard before U.S. District Judge Stephen V.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
A federal appeals court struck down Friday a $909-million award won by Golden State Bancorp Inc. in a breach-of-contract suit against the federal government, saying the award overcompensated the San Francisco-based thrift for a 1989 accounting rule change. The 3-0 opinion sends the case back to a trial judge for a new damage calculation that still could mean hundreds of millions of dollars. Further appeals are likely.
NEWS
January 19, 2001 | From Associated Press
The family of an 11-year-old Modesto boy killed during an early-morning drug raid has filed a federal lawsuit in Fresno, seeking unspecified monetary damages. The city of Modesto; SWAT officer David Hawn, who fired the shot that killed the boy; and two other officers, detectives Art Garza and Craig Grogan, are named as defendants in the lawsuit filed Wednesday. The Sept. 13 raid on Alberto Sepulveda's home was part of a countywide effort involving federal, state and local police agencies.
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