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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1993
On Friday, March 20, President Clinton announced his intention to nominate a person to the United States Supreme Court who possesses "a big heart" and experience "in the problems of real people." Like President Clinton, I believe that few other presidential powers affect the American people more, which makes his upcoming decision all the more important. Why then, is he allowing his decision to be affected by such irrelevant qualifications? The duties of our Supreme Court justices are to defend and preserve the U.S. Constitution, and to protect the constitutional and fundamental rights of citizens, states and government.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
December 26, 2013 | By Timothy M. Phelps and David Lauter
WASHINGTON -- It will likely be several days before Utah asks the U.S. Supreme Court to stop same-sex marriages in the state, the Utah attorney general's office said Thursday. The state had been expected to file a petition with the court as early as Thursday in a last-ditch effort to halt the weddings that have occurred since a federal judge struck down the state's ban on such unions last week. But the attorney general's website posted a notice that said outside lawyers need to be consulted before filing.
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OPINION
August 9, 1987
David Savage's article (Aug. 2), reviewing the civil rights record of Judge Robert Bork, President Reagan's nominee to the United States Supreme Court, indicates serious doubts as to whether he should sit on that court. Another major issue which should not be forgotten is Bork's role as solicitor general in the Nixon Administration. History records the salient feature of his career being the incident when he fired Special Prosecutor Archibald Cox on President Nixon's orders, apparently because Cox's investigation was coming uncomfortably close to Nixon.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2007 | David J. Garrow, Special to The Times
YOU know the name "Woodward," as in Bob Woodward, whose insider-based accounts of Washington decision-making have been runaway bestsellers since Richard Nixon's downfall. Well, now you should remember the name Greenburg because ABC News reporter Jan Crawford Greenburg's account of what's been happening at the U.S. Supreme Court in recent years is the richest and most impressive journalistic look at the panel since Woodward co-wrote "The Brethren" in 1979.
NEWS
December 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
Statement Tuesday by Bush's advisor, former Secretary of State James A. Baker III: "I have just spoken to Gov. Bush and Secretary Cheney. They are, of course, very pleased and gratified that seven justices of the United States Supreme Court agreed that there were constitutional problems with the recount ordered by the Florida Supreme Court.
OPINION
September 6, 1987
In the law there exists the centuries old principle of stare decisis . Translated it means let the decision stand. In other words, absent the most compelling set of circumstances and/or irrefutable reasons, an existing legal precedent as expressed in an opinion of a state's supreme court, the United States Supreme Court or a federal appeals court is not to be altered or overturned. This is not to say that rigidity rules; on the contrary, differing case facts and changed statutory applications can and do generate differing conclusions.
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal district judge in Pennsylvania ruled unconstitutional Friday key provisions in that state's controversial abortion control law, setting the stage for a legal battle that could go all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Senior U.S. District Judge Daniel H.
NEWS
December 11, 2000
Excerpts from editorials in U.S. newspapers Sunday on the latest developments in the contested presidential race: San Jose Mercury News We side with the U.S. court's four-judge minority, who would have counted now and ruled later. And we disagree with Florida Chief Justice Charles T. Wells that counting opens the door to constitutional crisis. Seattle Times The Florida Supreme Court had two jobs to do--interpret the election law and provide effective relief.
OPINION
October 25, 1987
The Los Angeles Times carried a story concerning the financial plight of Public Service Co. of New Hampshire (Part I, Oct. 14) and possible bankruptcy. Two examples of bankruptcy were mentioned, a small private utility and the Washington Public Power Supply System. The Supply System has not and has no intention of declaring bankruptcy. A formal executive board resolution to that effect has been adopted. This misconception about the Supply System is undoubtedly due to the highly controversial 1983 Washington State Supreme Court decision declaring the power purchase agreements for our nuclear units Nos. 4 and 5 invalid, thereby eliminating the revenue stream for those projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2003 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals court Tuesday stayed enforcement of its controversial ruling that use of the words "under God" makes the Pledge of Allegiance unconstitutional when recited in public school classrooms. U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Alfred T. Goodwin, a President Richard Nixon appointee, issued a 90-day stay, which allows schoolchildren in nine Western states to continue reciting the pledge, pending a decision by the Supreme Court on whether it will review the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2003 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals court Tuesday stayed enforcement of its controversial ruling that use of the words "under God" makes the Pledge of Allegiance unconstitutional when recited in public school classrooms. U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Alfred T. Goodwin, a President Richard Nixon appointee, issued a 90-day stay, which allows schoolchildren in nine Western states to continue reciting the pledge, pending a decision by the Supreme Court on whether it will review the case.
NEWS
December 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
Statement Tuesday by Bush's advisor, former Secretary of State James A. Baker III: "I have just spoken to Gov. Bush and Secretary Cheney. They are, of course, very pleased and gratified that seven justices of the United States Supreme Court agreed that there were constitutional problems with the recount ordered by the Florida Supreme Court.
NEWS
December 11, 2000
Excerpts from editorials in U.S. newspapers Sunday on the latest developments in the contested presidential race: San Jose Mercury News We side with the U.S. court's four-judge minority, who would have counted now and ruled later. And we disagree with Florida Chief Justice Charles T. Wells that counting opens the door to constitutional crisis. Seattle Times The Florida Supreme Court had two jobs to do--interpret the election law and provide effective relief.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
The Supreme Court refused to derail a California lawsuit accusing a cigarette maker of using Joe Camel, a suave cartoon character, to entice children to smoke. The court, acting without comment Monday, turned away arguments by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. that federal law preempts any such proceeding in a California state court. "We are not surprised; neither are we disappointed," said company spokeswoman Peggy Carter after learning of the court's action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1993
On Friday, March 20, President Clinton announced his intention to nominate a person to the United States Supreme Court who possesses "a big heart" and experience "in the problems of real people." Like President Clinton, I believe that few other presidential powers affect the American people more, which makes his upcoming decision all the more important. Why then, is he allowing his decision to be affected by such irrelevant qualifications? The duties of our Supreme Court justices are to defend and preserve the U.S. Constitution, and to protect the constitutional and fundamental rights of citizens, states and government.
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal district judge in Pennsylvania ruled unconstitutional Friday key provisions in that state's controversial abortion control law, setting the stage for a legal battle that could go all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Senior U.S. District Judge Daniel H.
NATIONAL
December 26, 2013 | By Timothy M. Phelps and David Lauter
WASHINGTON -- It will likely be several days before Utah asks the U.S. Supreme Court to stop same-sex marriages in the state, the Utah attorney general's office said Thursday. The state had been expected to file a petition with the court as early as Thursday in a last-ditch effort to halt the weddings that have occurred since a federal judge struck down the state's ban on such unions last week. But the attorney general's website posted a notice that said outside lawyers need to be consulted before filing.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
The Supreme Court refused to derail a California lawsuit accusing a cigarette maker of using Joe Camel, a suave cartoon character, to entice children to smoke. The court, acting without comment Monday, turned away arguments by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. that federal law preempts any such proceeding in a California state court. "We are not surprised; neither are we disappointed," said company spokeswoman Peggy Carter after learning of the court's action.
OPINION
October 25, 1987
The Los Angeles Times carried a story concerning the financial plight of Public Service Co. of New Hampshire (Part I, Oct. 14) and possible bankruptcy. Two examples of bankruptcy were mentioned, a small private utility and the Washington Public Power Supply System. The Supply System has not and has no intention of declaring bankruptcy. A formal executive board resolution to that effect has been adopted. This misconception about the Supply System is undoubtedly due to the highly controversial 1983 Washington State Supreme Court decision declaring the power purchase agreements for our nuclear units Nos. 4 and 5 invalid, thereby eliminating the revenue stream for those projects.
OPINION
September 6, 1987
In the law there exists the centuries old principle of stare decisis . Translated it means let the decision stand. In other words, absent the most compelling set of circumstances and/or irrefutable reasons, an existing legal precedent as expressed in an opinion of a state's supreme court, the United States Supreme Court or a federal appeals court is not to be altered or overturned. This is not to say that rigidity rules; on the contrary, differing case facts and changed statutory applications can and do generate differing conclusions.
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