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NEWS
February 12, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that the nation faces a crisis that could undermine future living standards, President Clinton flatly told an audience of business leaders Thursday that the economic package he plans to offer next week will raise taxes for both individuals and corporations. Clinton has walked around the subject of tax increases rhetorically for weeks.
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NEWS
December 8, 2001 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The post-Sept. 11 truce is over for President Bush's signature domestic achievement: the sweeping tax cut he pushed into law last spring. After weeks of deferential restraint, leading congressional Democrats have renewed efforts to blame the $1.35-trillion tax cut for the slow economy and the disappearing federal budget surplus--an opening salvo in what party strategists say will be a sustained political offensive through the 2002 election.
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NEWS
March 4, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush said Tuesday that he made a mistake in 1990 when he reneged on his campaign promise not to raise taxes and agreed to an increase as part of a compromise with Congress. Speaking to reporters before departing for a brief trip to Illinois, the President said that the decision to retreat from his pledge "probably wasn't worth it," given the "political flak" that has ensued.
BUSINESS
October 12, 2001 | WARREN VIETH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush and Congress, in their zeal to avert a deep recession, are getting ready to approve billions of dollars in new tax breaks. But economists said there's a hitch: Most of the leading proposals won't do much to help the economy, at least not when it needs help most. Although most people are just getting used to the idea of a recession, many economists are convinced the foundation has been laid for a recovery beginning in the first half of 2002.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1993 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton wants to take a bigger tax bite out of major oil and drug companies and collect more revenue from foreign enterprises operating in the United States, while granting tax relief to small businesses and promising larger stock profits for their investors.
BUSINESS
November 14, 1992 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A young Democratic President, troubled by a sluggish economy and a skeptical business community, proposes a new tax incentive designed to boost private sector spending and win the hearts and minds of corporate America. Bill Clinton in 1993? No, it was John F. Kennedy nearly a generation ago.
NEWS
January 26, 2001 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan on Thursday cautiously endorsed the kind of substantial tax cuts advocated by President Bush, saying federal budget surpluses have grown so large that the government must begin shrinking the amount of money it requires Americans to send to Washington.
NEWS
February 6, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton launched a bully-pulpit campaign Wednesday to sell a key element of his second-term agenda: a proposal to create broad new subsidies for middle-class parents worried about rising college costs. Traveling to this city, Clinton turned the spotlight on a state that has done what he hopes to do for the nation by offering the equivalent of a higher-education entitlement for millions of middle-income Americans.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2001 | JAMES FLANIGAN
After all the fuss, what will be the effect of the long-promised, loudly debated tax cut that is about to become law? The tax cut will give an immediate boost to consumer spending, but longer term, it is too small to have a significant effect on the economy. However, as a policy choice--the Bush administration choosing to return surplus revenue to taxpayers in cash rather than in government programs--this tax cut marks the beginning of a decade-long debate over ways to run the U.S. economy.
NEWS
December 16, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than two months behind schedule, the curtain fell on the 106th Congress on Friday as lawmakers resoundingly approved a final budget package that includes major increases in education spending, expanded Medicare payments for health care providers and modest tax breaks for poor communities. President Clinton, who like Congress was bargaining as a lame duck, fought hard to win an 18% boost in education spending for fiscal 2001.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2001 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lower-income families that didn't get a tax rebate check this summer could still get a break from this year's big tax cut, thanks to a recent action by lawmakers. Congress instructed the Internal Revenue Service to make changes in the standard 1040 tax form that will extend the immediate benefit from the new 10% tax bracket further down the economic ladder.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2001 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How do you spell economic relief? T-A-X-C-U-T. At least that's what some in Congress think. Americans could get several tax breaks if lawmakers adopt proposals aimed at reducing the economic fallout from the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. It's impossible to say whether any of the proposals will become law. Under consideration are a cut in capital gains rates; increased write-offs for capital losses; and cuts in payroll taxes, which would give a boost to lower-income taxpayers.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2001 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State and federal tax authorities are giving a break to taxpayers directly affected by last week's terrorist attacks and those whose payments may be late or lost because of mail disruptions. Federal tax filing deadlines of nearly all types have been extended by the Internal Revenue Service to provide relief to taxpayers stymied by delays in mail delivery. Tax returns, payments or tax-election filings that were due Sept. 10 or later can be delayed until Sept.
NEWS
September 11, 2001 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a nervous Congress groped for a remedy for the ailing economy, Senate Republican Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) proposed Monday linking tax cuts for investors--a GOP favorite--with some form of payroll tax relief that has been endorsed by Democrats. Although Democrats reacted coolly to the suggestion, the fact that Lott was open to such an idea provided a measure of how feverish the Republicans' search for an economic stimulus plan has become.
NEWS
August 22, 2001 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
President Bush moved Tuesday to preemptively shape the looming debate over the dwindling federal budget surplus, arguing that it is excessive spending, not his tax cut, that has created the greatest risk of future deficits. Sharpening the argument that is likely to dominate Washington this fall, Bush defended his tax cut as a tonic for the flagging economy and charged that new government spending poses the greatest threat to both economic recovery and the federal budget.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2001 | LIZ PULLIAM WESTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thanks to recent changes in the nation's tax laws, two popular estate-planning techniques could backfire on married couples and grandparents who don't update their wills or living trusts, estate tax experts say. The changes, which were part of the $1.35-trillion tax cut signed by President Bush in June, could result in too much or too little money being left to certain heirs, estate planners said.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1993 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
Christopher E. Zuleski dutifully anted up $523.81 in luxury taxes when he bought his Toyota Land Cruiser last April. Four months later, Zuleski found out that sport utility vehicles like his were exempt from the tax. He's been battling to get a refund ever since. And Zuleski is not alone. Land Cruiser buyers from Los Angeles to New York have about a 50-50 chance of getting hit with the luxury tax, industry insiders say. The reason why--abject confusion--speaks volumes about the complexity of U.
NEWS
May 7, 1990 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Sunday night urged Democratic leaders in Congress to join him in a summit meeting to trim the fiscal 1991 budget deficit. He pledged that nothing--not even the dreaded word "taxes"--would be excluded from the discussions. "No preconditions--everything's on the table," Bush told the Democrats, according to House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel's account of a 1 1/2-hour meeting between the President and the four top congressional leaders at the White House.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The big tax cut passed by Congress in May provides a legion of generous tax breaks for Americans with a specific savings goal in mind, such as education or retirement. But is it too much of a good thing? The menu of tax breaks is so appealing that it may tempt some people to overindulge by plowing more money than they should into 401(k) accounts, 529 college plans and other savings vehicles. Often, mutual funds are the investments of choice for these accounts.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2001 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the more generous and immediate tax breaks included in the big tax package President Bush signed into law last week is a boost in the child tax credit. This credit, for parents with children 16 or younger, increases from $500 to $600 per child this year and eventually will rise to $1,000 per child. But if you're hoping for the full break, your children had better be young.
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