Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Territories And Possessions
IN THE NEWS

United States Territories And Possessions

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elizam Escobar has spent 19 years in what he calls the "living death" of prison, locked away for his part in a clandestine Puerto Rican independence group the U.S. government once branded as terrorists. Now the opportunity for freedom presents itself, in the form of a single sheet of paper, an offer of clemency with conditions from President Clinton.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 6, 2000 |
Tens of thousands of people marched in Puerto Rico's capital Sunday to celebrate their U.S. citizenship in an attempt to counter a recent outpouring of nationalism on the Caribbean island. The march was organized by the New Progressive Party, which favors statehood for Puerto Rico, a U.S. commonwealth. NPP officials fear that recent demonstrations against the U.S. Navy over the Vieques bombing range sent the message that Puerto Ricans did not want to remain part of the United States.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A political arrangement that would bring the remote Western Pacific archipelago of Palau more self-government and nearly $500 million in U.S. aid was headed for defeat at the hands of voters. Early returns from Tuesday's balloting showed that about half of the Palauans who voted supported a Compact of Free Association and subsidiary agreements with the United States, but the results were falling short of the required 75%. Final results were not expected until Friday.
NEWS
September 12, 1999 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vilified in the United States as unrepentant terrorists, but revered by many in this Caribbean island as patriots, a group of Puerto Rican nationalists freed from prison by President Clinton was welcomed here Saturday as heroes. Local officials lionized them as saviors of Puerto Rican honor. Airport security guards posed for pictures with four of the activists, who just hours earlier had been locked up in federal penitentiaries. Children presented them with kisses and bouquets of flowers.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | From United Press International
A group of unidentified individuals broke into a U.S. Air Force Base on Sunday and set a National Guard A-7 combat jet on fire, causing $100,000 damage to the aircraft, officials said. The fire caused no injuries at the base next to the capital's Luis Munoz Marin International Airport. No group immediately claimed responsibility for the incident, and police said authorities were continuing their investigation.
NEWS
March 6, 2000 |
Tens of thousands of people marched in Puerto Rico's capital Sunday to celebrate their U.S. citizenship in an attempt to counter a recent outpouring of nationalism on the Caribbean island. The march was organized by the New Progressive Party, which favors statehood for Puerto Rico, a U.S. commonwealth. NPP officials fear that recent demonstrations against the U.S. Navy over the Vieques bombing range sent the message that Puerto Ricans did not want to remain part of the United States.
NEWS
September 2, 1999 | From Associated Press
A House committee subpoenaed all administration records Wednesday related to President Clinton's decision to offer clemency to 16 Puerto Rican militants. Subpoenas issued by Rep. Dan Burton's Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, which were obtained by the Associated Press, seek records from the White House, the Justice Department and the Bureau of Prisons. Sen. Orrin G.
NEWS
September 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Sixteen Puerto Ricans jailed on sedition and weapons convictions will hold a conference call Wednesday to decide whether to accept President Clinton's offer of clemency, supporters in San Juan said. The Puerto Rican Pro Human Rights Committee, which has led efforts to free the activists, said the prisoners would probably announce their decision before the deadline of 5 p.m. Friday.
NEWS
March 5, 1998 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One hundred years after Puerto Rico was seized by the United States, the House, by the narrowest of margins, voted Wednesday night to allow the Caribbean island to choose to become the 51st state, remain a commonwealth or split off as an independent nation.
NEWS
December 9, 1992 | from The Washington Post
House Democrats decided Tuesday to give Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.) and representatives of four U.S. territories a vote on the House floor starting in January. The action, which came in a closed-door session, would give Norton and the other representatives the right to vote on virtually every substantive issue before the full House.
NEWS
September 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Sixteen Puerto Ricans jailed on sedition and weapons convictions will hold a conference call Wednesday to decide whether to accept President Clinton's offer of clemency, supporters in San Juan said. The Puerto Rican Pro Human Rights Committee, which has led efforts to free the activists, said the prisoners would probably announce their decision before the deadline of 5 p.m. Friday.
NEWS
September 2, 1999 | From Associated Press
A House committee subpoenaed all administration records Wednesday related to President Clinton's decision to offer clemency to 16 Puerto Rican militants. Subpoenas issued by Rep. Dan Burton's Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, which were obtained by the Associated Press, seek records from the White House, the Justice Department and the Bureau of Prisons. Sen. Orrin G.
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elizam Escobar has spent 19 years in what he calls the "living death" of prison, locked away for his part in a clandestine Puerto Rican independence group the U.S. government once branded as terrorists. Now the opportunity for freedom presents itself, in the form of a single sheet of paper, an offer of clemency with conditions from President Clinton.
NEWS
December 14, 1998 | From Associated Press
Supporters of making Puerto Rico the 51st U.S. state refused to concede defeat after a referendum Sunday was won by backers of the Caribbean island's existing commonwealth ties to the United States. Final results showed that 50.2% voted for the "none of the above" option adopted by the commonwealth party, while statehood had 46.5%. In a similar nonbinding referendum in 1993, commonwealth status beat out statehood by 49% to 46%.
NEWS
July 26, 1998 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For much of the last 100 years, attention paid to this U.S. territory far out in the Caribbean Sea has reflected the island's share of the Earth: It's minuscule. Yet, 3.8 million U.S. citizens are crowded onto this tropical isle--and more than half of them are dissatisfied and clamoring for change.
NEWS
March 5, 1998 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One hundred years after Puerto Rico was seized by the United States, the House, by the narrowest of margins, voted Wednesday night to allow the Caribbean island to choose to become the 51st state, remain a commonwealth or split off as an independent nation.
NEWS
January 6, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS and WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The largest and most diverse class of freshman lawmakers since World War II took the oath of office Tuesday as the 103rd Congress convened amid pomp and ceremony and pledges by Democrats and Republicans to end 12 years of government gridlock. The festive mood quickly struck a sour note, however, when the House plunged into its first substantive debate of the year over rival Democratic and Republican proposals for changes in the rules governing the way members work.
NEWS
January 3, 1993 | Associated Press
Pedro Rossello was sworn in Saturday as governor of the biggest overseas U.S. territory, pledging to fight for a new star on the United States flag: Puerto Rico's. "From now on, we'll go search for a star . . . a star we deserve, a star that is rightfully ours . . . earned with blood and justice," he said, referring to efforts for statehood for Puerto Rico. "It can be done," the governor told about 10,000 people gathered in front of San Juan's seaside Capitol.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1997 | D'JAMILA SALEM-FITZGERALD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking aim at a little-known legal loophole, domestic unions are pressing Congress to force the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands to adopt the federal minimum wage and comply with other U.S. labor laws. Joined by Rep. George Miller (D-Martinez), labor leaders on Thursday called for passage of legislation designed to improve working conditions on the Marianas, a U.S. territory in the western Pacific that is the site of several garment manufacturing operations.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|