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United States Terrorism

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NEWS
March 15, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Making perhaps the most sensitive stop of his Middle East tour, Vice President Dick Cheney on Thursday courted a Yemeni government anxious about taking up a role in the war on terrorism. Meanwhile, new details emerged about U.S. military assistance to the Arabian Peninsula state. The vice president spent less than two hours in Yemen's capital, Sana, talking with President Ali Abdullah Saleh before leaving for Salalah, Oman. Cheney flew on a U.S.
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NEWS
March 15, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Making perhaps the most sensitive stop of his Middle East tour, Vice President Dick Cheney on Thursday courted a Yemeni government anxious about taking up a role in the war on terrorism. Meanwhile, new details emerged about U.S. military assistance to the Arabian Peninsula state. The vice president spent less than two hours in Yemen's capital, Sana, talking with President Ali Abdullah Saleh before leaving for Salalah, Oman. Cheney flew on a U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2001 | EDWARD N. LUTTWAK, Edward N. Luttwak is a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington
After 85 court sessions and nearly $90 million in legal costs, one Libyan underling has been found innocent of the destruction of Pan American Flight 103, and another insignificant underling, Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi, has been found guilty. The other thing that the trial proved was the utter futility of responding to terrorism with the ordinary procedures of criminal justice. Col. Moammar Kadafi, the Libyan ruler, could not even be interrogated, let alone arrested and convicted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2001 | EDWARD N. LUTTWAK, Edward N. Luttwak is a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington
After 85 court sessions and nearly $90 million in legal costs, one Libyan underling has been found innocent of the destruction of Pan American Flight 103, and another insignificant underling, Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi, has been found guilty. The other thing that the trial proved was the utter futility of responding to terrorism with the ordinary procedures of criminal justice. Col. Moammar Kadafi, the Libyan ruler, could not even be interrogated, let alone arrested and convicted.
OPINION
February 10, 2007
Re "How scared should we be, really?" Current, Feb. 4 Francis Fukuyama uses data that seem selected to support his untenable conclusions. The global economy, he said, is "driving ahead full speed." Presumably this is based on each nation's gross domestic product, which indicates how much is spent each year but has almost nothing to do with the health of a nation's economy. As a species, we are consuming the Earth's resources and upsetting the ecosystem much faster than nature can rectify the damage we inflict.
NATIONAL
May 27, 2006 | From the Baltimore Sun
Vice President Dick Cheney, speaking to the first Naval Academy graduates to begin classes after the Sept. 11 attacks, laid out a grim picture Friday of enemies "still desperately trying to hit us again," as he defended President Bush's anti-terrorism policies. Addressing 980 midshipmen on a steamy day, Cheney said terrorists were working to "establish a totalitarian empire."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2001 | ARIANNA HUFFINGTON, Arianna Huffington is a syndicated columnist. E-mail: arianna@ariannaonline.com
The world has changed forever. That's what everyone has been saying since Sept. 11. In many ways, it's obviously true: Who would have thought that opening your mail without a hazmat crew standing by would qualify as risky behavior? But some things, apparently, remain impervious to suicide hijackings, bioterrorism or even patriotism.
NATIONAL
June 24, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A federal judge who used to authorize wiretaps in terrorism and espionage cases criticized President Bush's decision to order warrantless surveillance after the Sept. 11 attacks. Washington District Judge Royce C. Lamberth said Saturday that it was proper for executive-branch agencies to conduct such surveillance, but that the executive should not decide alone whom to spy on in national security cases. The decision should be shared with the judiciary, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2005 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
The man accused of devising a plot to attack military installations and recruiting centers in Los Angeles County pleaded not guilty Monday to federal terrorism charges. Kevin Lamar James entered the plea in U.S. District Court in Santa Ana, where he will be tried along with three co-defendants on charges of planning a jihad against 20 military targets, authorities said.
OPINION
August 26, 2002
In his Aug. 21 commentary, "U.S.-Saudi Rift Rewards Terrorists," Hassan Yassin asserts that Osama bin Laden chose Saudis for 9/11 to create a Saudi-U.S. rift--and ignores the obvious, that he chose them for the same reason that NBA coaches select blacks for their basketball teams. They were his best source. He claims the friendship of many Saudis but discards the fact that their Arabic publications are full of anti-U.S. vitriol. And he is oblivious to what 9/11 families are claiming: that Saudi Arabia is a principal source and conduit of funding for terrorism.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The United States today accused Libya of lying to the world community and said it has photographic evidence that the two MIG jet fighters shot down Wednesday were armed and approaching Navy jets with hostile intent. A Navy intelligence review of videotape shot by one of the F-14 Tomcat jets "tells me that the Libyan ambassador to the U.N. is a liar. That's the first thing it tells me," said Dan Howard, the Pentagon's chief spokesman.
NEWS
July 3, 1985 | United Press International
Britain and the United States agreed today to join in fighting the "evil" of air terrorism by pressing for an international boycott of the Beirut airport. Announcement of the agreement followed a meeting between Vice President George Bush and Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who also suggested that Beirut airport authorities shared complicity with the hijackers of TWA Flight 847.
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