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United States Trade Africa

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NEWS
April 15, 2000 | From Reuters
The White House on Friday backed a congressional compromise that would extend new trade privileges to Africa, the Caribbean and Central America, saying it would give an economic boost to the world's poorest nations. "This bill is a solid compromise effort that will create a framework for expanding economic growth and opportunity in both regions," U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky said in a statement. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.
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BUSINESS
May 5, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House passed legislation Thursday easing trade barriers for impoverished nations in Africa, Central America and the Caribbean, a vote some advocates cheered as a favorable prelude to congressional action on the pending China trade bill. The passage, by a 309 to 110 margin, culminated months of negotiations to iron out differences between competing bills passed last year by the House and the Senate.
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BUSINESS
May 5, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House passed legislation Thursday easing trade barriers for impoverished nations in Africa, Central America and the Caribbean, a vote some advocates cheered as a favorable prelude to congressional action on the pending China trade bill. The passage, by a 309 to 110 margin, culminated months of negotiations to iron out differences between competing bills passed last year by the House and the Senate.
NEWS
April 15, 2000 | From Reuters
The White House on Friday backed a congressional compromise that would extend new trade privileges to Africa, the Caribbean and Central America, saying it would give an economic boost to the world's poorest nations. "This bill is a solid compromise effort that will create a framework for expanding economic growth and opportunity in both regions," U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky said in a statement. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.
NEWS
March 12, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House passed controversial trade legislation Wednesday designed to aid poor countries in sub-Saharan Africa, despite vigorous opposition from some American blacks and liberals who fear that it would threaten low-wage jobs in the United States. The measure, approved 233-186, would grant full access to U.S. markets--free of most import quotas or duties--to those sub-Saharan African countries that are deemed to be moving toward democracy and free-market economies.
NEWS
July 17, 1999 | From Associated Press
Legislation to extend a broad range of trade preferences to Africa, allowing many of its products to be imported duty-free, won House approval Friday. The legislation, designed to spur economic growth and private investment in 48 sub-Saharan countries, was approved, 234 to 163. The House passed nearly identical legislation last year, but it died in the Senate, partly due to concerns that it could hurt American textile workers. This year, sponsors are more optimistic about Senate passage.
NEWS
February 4, 1999 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few issues make for such odd alliances in Congress as free trade. So it wasn't that startling Wednesday when Rep. Ed Royce, a conservative Republican from Fullerton, and Rep. Charles B. Rangel, a liberal New York Democrat, stood shoulder to shoulder here to pledge anew their support for legislation to strengthen trade with Africa. Royce talked up a policy of engagement with a continent often marginalized from the global economy.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California companies looking for alternatives to Asia's troubled economies should consider pursuing the nearly $2 billion worth of aerospace contracts coming up in Africa and the Middle East, according to the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. In spite of its mammoth size and potential market of 650 million people, Africa has not been a major target for U.S. companies. In 1997, their exports to Africa came to $6.4 billion, or less than 1% of foreign sales.
NEWS
July 17, 1999 | From Associated Press
Legislation to extend a broad range of trade preferences to Africa, allowing many of its products to be imported duty-free, won House approval Friday. The legislation, designed to spur economic growth and private investment in 48 sub-Saharan countries, was approved, 234 to 163. The House passed nearly identical legislation last year, but it died in the Senate, partly due to concerns that it could hurt American textile workers. This year, sponsors are more optimistic about Senate passage.
NEWS
February 4, 1999 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few issues make for such odd alliances in Congress as free trade. So it wasn't that startling Wednesday when Rep. Ed Royce, a conservative Republican from Fullerton, and Rep. Charles B. Rangel, a liberal New York Democrat, stood shoulder to shoulder here to pledge anew their support for legislation to strengthen trade with Africa. Royce talked up a policy of engagement with a continent often marginalized from the global economy.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California companies looking for alternatives to Asia's troubled economies should consider pursuing the nearly $2 billion worth of aerospace contracts coming up in Africa and the Middle East, according to the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. In spite of its mammoth size and potential market of 650 million people, Africa has not been a major target for U.S. companies. In 1997, their exports to Africa came to $6.4 billion, or less than 1% of foreign sales.
NEWS
March 12, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House passed controversial trade legislation Wednesday designed to aid poor countries in sub-Saharan Africa, despite vigorous opposition from some American blacks and liberals who fear that it would threaten low-wage jobs in the United States. The measure, approved 233-186, would grant full access to U.S. markets--free of most import quotas or duties--to those sub-Saharan African countries that are deemed to be moving toward democracy and free-market economies.
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