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United States Trade Argentina

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BUSINESS
August 4, 2000 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decision by Sunkist Growers, the country's largest citrus cooperative, to market imported lemons from Argentina has soured relations with many of its 6,500 members in California and Arizona, especially those in Ventura County whose fruit would directly compete with the imports. Sunkist's decision marks the first time the Sherman Oaks-based co-op has ever put its label on foreign fruit.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2001 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County growers are cheering a federal judge's decision to suspend the importation of Argentine citrus into the United States, with some predicting Monday it could lead to a permanent ban. Citing concerns about pests and disease, growers filed suit last year seeking to overturn a decision by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to allow Argentine fruit into the country starting in summer 2000. A U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2000 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two years of debate and protest, Ventura County citrus growers on Thursday called a federal decision to allow Argentine citrus into the United States an outrage, saying they are frustrated by the federal government's failure to heed their concerns. Although the decision was not unexpected--it becomes official when it appears in the Federal Register early next week--ranchers and agriculture officials called the new rule a political move to smooth the way for such U.S.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2000 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decision by Sunkist Growers, the country's largest citrus cooperative, to market imported lemons from Argentina has soured relations with many of its 6,500 members in California and Arizona, especially those in Ventura County whose fruit would directly compete with the imports. Sunkist's decision marks the first time the Sherman Oaks-based co-op has ever put its label on foreign fruit.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Escalating a trade dispute with one of its closest allies in South America, the Clinton administration threatened to impose higher tariffs on $260 million of imports from Argentina unless it does more to protect U.S. drug patents. Acting U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky said the sanctions would go into effect after March 1, after a public comment period to determine which Argentine imports to target.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1996 | From Reuters
The United States on Tuesday targeted four nations for investigations on charges of unfair trade practices and hailed progress with Japan to deregulate its insurance industry. Brazil, Indonesia and Australia face investigations in connection with programs that affect auto makers. Argentina is alleged to have excessively high tariffs on imported textiles, apparel and footwear. At a news conference, acting U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2000 | FRED ALVAREZ
Group cites risk of disease and pests in its effort to have Department of Agriculture reverse new policy. Citrus growers announced Wednesday that they intend to file a lawsuit aimed at overturning a federal decision to allow Argentine citrus to be imported into the United States. The Santa Paula-based U.S. Citrus Science Council, which has spearheaded the fight against the importation of Argentine citrus, notified U.S.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1998
Postponing a potential headache for California citrus growers, the U.S. Department of Agriculture delayed its decision to allow Argentina to export citrus to this country. Earlier this year, agriculture officials recommended allowing imports of some Argentine lemons. The action angered California growers, many of them in Ventura County, who feared not only competition from a lower-cost rival but also the importation of troublesome insect pests that might accompany the fruit. U.S. Sen.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
This summer's drought may be devastating for North American farmers, but it has handed a multibillion-dollar bonanza to grain growers in Argentina and Brazil, generating a glimmer of optimism in an otherwise desperate economic climate. Argentina expects a windfall of up to $2 billion in extra revenue from agricultural exports because of higher prices this year, government officials say. Nearly half the bonus is attributed directly to the drought in the United States and Canada.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2000 | FRED ALVAREZ
Group cites risk of disease and pests in its effort to have Department of Agriculture reverse new policy. Citrus growers announced Wednesday that they intend to file a lawsuit aimed at overturning a federal decision to allow Argentine citrus to be imported into the United States. The Santa Paula-based U.S. Citrus Science Council, which has spearheaded the fight against the importation of Argentine citrus, notified U.S.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2000 | Bloomberg News
California and Arizona citrus growers said they will file a lawsuit against Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman to block imports of lemons, oranges and grapefruits from Argentina because of the threat of disease. The U.S. Citrus Science Council said the suit, to be filed in U.S. District Court this month either in Washington or Fresno, will demand that a new rule permitting imports from Argentina be declared invalid. Last month the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2000 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two years of debate and protest, Ventura County citrus growers on Thursday called a federal decision to allow Argentine citrus into the United States an outrage, saying they are frustrated by the federal government's failure to heed their concerns. Although the decision was not unexpected--it becomes official when it appears in the Federal Register early next week--ranchers and agriculture officials called the new rule a political move to smooth the way for such U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ventura County lemon growers are bracing for bad news from federal regulators who are expected to issue a decision any day on whether to allow the importation of Argentine lemons, a decision that could cut into the market for the region's No. 1 cash crop. But farmers say it is more than an economic issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1999 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California growers showed up in force Monday to assail a plan to allow Argentina to export citrus to the United States, arguing that the proposal could introduce a host of crop-destroying pests and diseases to the nation's $2.5-billion citrus industry. Wearing green-and-white buttons that read "Where's the Science?" and "Practice Safe Citrus!" more than 700 growers, farm workers and elected officials packed the Thousand Oaks Civics Arts Plaza for a public hearing on the U.S.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1998
Postponing a potential headache for California citrus growers, the U.S. Department of Agriculture delayed its decision to allow Argentina to export citrus to this country. Earlier this year, agriculture officials recommended allowing imports of some Argentine lemons. The action angered California growers, many of them in Ventura County, who feared not only competition from a lower-cost rival but also the importation of troublesome insect pests that might accompany the fruit. U.S. Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2001 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County growers are cheering a federal judge's decision to suspend the importation of Argentine citrus into the United States, with some predicting Monday it could lead to a permanent ban. Citing concerns about pests and disease, growers filed suit last year seeking to overturn a decision by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to allow Argentine fruit into the country starting in summer 2000. A U.S.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2000 | Bloomberg News
California and Arizona citrus growers said they will file a lawsuit against Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman to block imports of lemons, oranges and grapefruits from Argentina because of the threat of disease. The U.S. Citrus Science Council said the suit, to be filed in U.S. District Court this month either in Washington or Fresno, will demand that a new rule permitting imports from Argentina be declared invalid. Last month the U.S.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Argentina can begin shipping fresh, chilled or frozen beef to the U.S. market beginning Aug. 25, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said. The ruling clears the way for the first beef imports from Argentina since 1931, when an outbreak of hoof-and-mouth disease halted sales to the United States. The announcement follows a meeting last week between Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman and Argentine Agriculture Secretary Felipe Sola, who has pushed for the step.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Escalating a trade dispute with one of its closest allies in South America, the Clinton administration threatened to impose higher tariffs on $260 million of imports from Argentina unless it does more to protect U.S. drug patents. Acting U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky said the sanctions would go into effect after March 1, after a public comment period to determine which Argentine imports to target.
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