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United States Trade Asia

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BUSINESS
January 1, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 21 heavyweight U.S. corporate executives, traveling with President Bush on a high-profile visit to Asia is an honor and a valuable opportunity to open up markets. But did Bush pick the right people? While most of the executives on Bush's caravan represent industries that complain of being blocked from Asian markets, the entourage is not broad enough, some observers familiar with Asian markets say.
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BUSINESS
March 20, 2001 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The amount of imported cargo handled by the nation's two busiest ports dropped significantly in February, suggesting that the slowing U.S. economy is causing retailers and others to import fewer consumer goods from Asia. Imports handled by the Port of Los Angeles dropped 8% in February, which was the first decrease in year-over-year inbound cargo shipments in nearly two years. Meanwhile, the neighboring Port of Long Beach saw imports drop 13%, the third monthly decline in six months.
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BUSINESS
September 6, 1998 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With demand from Asia sinking, pork is no longer bringing home the bacon for Hoosier farmer Jim Moseley. "The reason we have $28 pigs now," said Moseley, recalling the days of $52 hogs, "is we had built a substantial demand base in Japan and Taiwan. The Asian crisis is hurting us." He has lots of company. The nation's agricultural producers are feeling pinched as a falloff in Asian demand for grains, meats, cotton and produce takes a multibillion-dollar bite out of U.S. farm exports.
NEWS
December 22, 1999 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
One of the ironies of the presidential campaign is that some foreign governments view the cautious vice president, Al Gore, as an unsettling harbinger of change and his challengers as soothing perpetuators of the status quo. A few days ago, a senior Asian diplomat was giving a private rundown of what the four leading candidates might mean for Asia. It went like this: George W. Bush?
NEWS
July 21, 1995 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Japan averted a trade war Thursday night by agreeing to open up new cargo routes for both nations and renegotiate a 43-year-old aviation treaty that promises to dramatically reshape the competition for lucrative transpacific routes. The accord could signal improved U.S.-Japan trade relations, following by only three weeks the settlement of a very bitter and contentious dispute over U.S. access to the Japanese auto market.
NEWS
March 22, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The strongest evidence of damage from the Asian economic crisis emerged last week in the form of a record U.S. trade deficit, but the shipping world didn't need to be told: It has been turned on its head by Asia's woes. Much as U-Haul trailers from Los Angeles stacked up in Seattle during the early 1990s flight from California, thousands of empty shipping containers are piling up at Long Beach, Los Angeles and other West Coast ports because of plummeting Asian demand for U.S.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1999 | CHRIS KRAUL, trade reporter
Julie Meier Wright, the former state secretary of trade and commerce, now chief exec of the San Diego Regional Economic Development Corp., recently led a trade mission to Asia along with Juan Martinez, secretary of economic development for the Mexican state of Baja California. They called on 350 companies to consider the San Diego-Baja region as a site for establishing or expanding U.S. facilities.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1999 | From Reuters
The U.S. trade deficit jumped to a record $25.94 billion in October, as gaps with China and Japan swelled to new highs and oil prices climbed to nearly a three-year peak, the government said Thursday. The unexpected jump in the deficit came two weeks after the collapse of global trade-liberalization talks in Seattle and highlighted the difficulty Washington is having prying open foreign markets as American exports slipped for a second straight month.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1998 | Juan Hovey, Juan Hovey is a freelance writer
If you export American-made goods to the Pacific Rim, you have probably seen your business shrink in recent months as the financial crisis has deepened in Asia. Sooner or later the crisis will ease, of course, but no one busy running a business in the U.S. can do much to speed it along, given the scale and complexity of the financial and political troubles in Japan, South Korea, Indonesia and elsewhere. None of this, however, renders you powerless.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long-predicted flood of imports from Asia has yet to materialize, but U.S. sales to most of that region have taken a serious hit because of Asia's economic crisis and the strong dollar, the latest trade data show. But trade experts say that trying to measure the impact of the Asian financial crisis on an increasingly globally complex U.S. economy is like trying to pinpoint El Nino.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1999 | From Reuters
The U.S. trade deficit jumped to a record $25.94 billion in October, as gaps with China and Japan swelled to new highs and oil prices climbed to nearly a three-year peak, the government said Thursday. The unexpected jump in the deficit came two weeks after the collapse of global trade-liberalization talks in Seattle and highlighted the difficulty Washington is having prying open foreign markets as American exports slipped for a second straight month.
NEWS
November 29, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring the region's economic crisis over, leaders of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations agreed Sunday to increase cooperation with Japan, China and South Korea and to accelerate moves toward the establishment of a common market, similar to the European Union.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1999 | From Reuters
The U.S. trade deficit swelled to a record $25.2 billion in July as Asian and European goods flooded the U.S. market as never before, the Commerce Department said Tuesday. The surge in the deficit rattled stocks, bonds and the dollar. The trade gap was much wider than the $23.8 billion forecast by Wall Street analysts, and greater than the $24.6-billion deficit in June, which was also a record. Trade imbalances with China, Japan, Western Europe and Canada rose to record highs in July.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1999 | STEPHEN GREGORY
Asia's export juggernaut continued to steam through Southern California in August, pushing levels of inbound cargo at the Port of Los Angeles to a record high for the second straight month. And, in a potentially positive sign for the nation's gaping trade imbalance, export levels at the nation's second-busiest port were higher for the fourth straight month. In August, the port took in 12% more cargo containers than a year ago. Most inbound cargo is finished consumer goods.
NEWS
September 13, 1999 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton vigorously touted trade and tranquillity in Asia on Sunday, urging business executives and the many world leaders gathered here to do their part to promote both. As Clinton praised the benefits of free trade and explored ways to reduce tensions on the Korean peninsula and in the Taiwan Strait, however, the crisis in East Timor loomed over the annual meeting of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1999 | Stephen Gregory
Future trends in trade between the United States and Asia will be among the topics discussed at an import-export forum Tuesday in Los Angeles. Also on the agenda at the Asian Trade Opportunities and Constraints talk will be a discussion on techniques for forging successful relationships and the impact of the Asian economic crisis on trade. Panelists include Jesun Paik of Manufacturers Bank, Jerri Slifer of the U.S.
BUSINESS
July 18, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deepening economic slump in Asia propelled the U.S. foreign trade deficit to another record high in May as hard-hit Asian countries bought fewer U.S. exports and Americans stepped up their purchases of imports, the government reported Friday. The May deficit of $15.8 billion, which exceeded the previous monthly high of $14.3 billion set in April, put the nation on track toward a record of more than $160 billion for the year.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1998 | Reuters
Tyson Foods Inc. said it will record $196 million in fiscal fourth- quarter charges as it streamlines production at its poultry plants and accounts for exposure to troubled Russian and Asian economies, a figure in line with analyst expectations. The Springdale, Ark.-based poultry processor, whose fourth quarter ends Oct. 3, said last month it will close plants, cut its work force and write down goodwill.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1999 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If this is what shipping deregulation is all about, Costa Mesa toy maker and importer Mark Lee will take the good old days of steamship cartels and price-fixing any time. Like every other U.S. merchant who imports from Asia, Lee today begins paying up to 47% more in ocean transportation costs for the Star Trek Collectibles, Amazing Amy dolls and Friend.link toy pagers that he has shipped from China to the West Coast for sale in places such as Wal-Mart, Target and Toys R Us.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1999 | CHRIS KRAUL, trade reporter
Julie Meier Wright, the former state secretary of trade and commerce, now chief exec of the San Diego Regional Economic Development Corp., recently led a trade mission to Asia along with Juan Martinez, secretary of economic development for the Mexican state of Baja California. They called on 350 companies to consider the San Diego-Baja region as a site for establishing or expanding U.S. facilities.
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