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United States Trade Brazil

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September 15, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A split has developed within the Bush Administration over whether to allow IBM to sell Brazil supercomputer equipment that some experts contend could help Iraq improve its missile technology and develop nuclear weapons, according to government officials. The debate over the pending export is expected to go to the National Security Council at the White House next week. And Congress is about to jump into the fray with the introduction of Senate legislation to block the sale.
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BUSINESS
September 4, 2001 | GILBERT LE GRAS, REUTERS
Brazil, a world leader in food exports, won U.S. support and near unanimous agreement from 16 other major agricultural nations on Monday to insist liberalized farm trade be at the center of any new round of global trade talks. Farms produce the equivalent of about 50% of global economic output. But agriculture is one of the most heavily subsidized and protected sectors in the world.
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BUSINESS
February 24, 2001
* Alliance Imaging Inc., a diagnostic imaging company that was bought by Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co., filed for an initial stock sale to raise as much as $172.5 million. The Anaheim-based company also plans to offer $150 million of senior subordinated notes, according to the filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. More than 90% of Alliance's revenue comes from magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brazilian leaders have hardened their stance on joining a proposed hemispheric free-trade zone, saying they will agree only if the United States opens up its agricultural and steel commodities markets and modifies anti-dumping laws. Their comments over the last week are the latest in a string of Brazilian complaints that U.S. trade policy unfairly keeps the South American nation's orange juice, sugar, tobacco and steel out of the world's richest markets.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1996 | From Reuters
The United States on Tuesday targeted four nations for investigations on charges of unfair trade practices and hailed progress with Japan to deregulate its insurance industry. Brazil, Indonesia and Australia face investigations in connection with programs that affect auto makers. Argentina is alleged to have excessively high tariffs on imported textiles, apparel and footwear. At a news conference, acting U.S.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Brazil Joins Complaint Against U.S.: Brazil joined Venezuela in bringing the case before the World Trade Organization over new U.S. rules on imported gasoline. The WTO's Dispute Settlement Body agreed that the Brazilian complaint will be studied by the same panel set up in April to look into the U.S.-Venezuelan dispute, sources said. Brazil and Venezuela argue that standards established by the U.S.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
ITC Says Some Stainless Steel Imports Hurt U.S.: Stainless steel wire rod imports from Brazil, France and India are injuring or could injure the U.S. market, the International Trade Commission said in a preliminary ruling. The Commerce Department must now rule on whether imports from those countries are being sold on the American market at unfair prices, a practice called dumping. If the department finds dumping and the ITC rules that the imports are conclusively hurting the U.S.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2001
* Alliance Imaging Inc., a diagnostic imaging company that was bought by Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co., filed for an initial stock sale to raise as much as $172.5 million. The Anaheim-based company also plans to offer $150 million of senior subordinated notes, according to the filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. More than 90% of Alliance's revenue comes from magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2000 | From Reuters
Under pressure from U.S. steelmakers and labor unions, President Clinton on Friday imposed punitive tariffs on steel imports in a move that could increase trade tensions between the United States and major steel- producing nations such as Brazil, Japan and South Korea. The White House said the tariffs will apply to imported steel wire rod, which is used to make hangers, cables and fasteners, and imported line pipe.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Brazil agreed to curtail exports to the U.S. of a key steel product used in cars and appliances to avoid tariffs that would have priced its steelmakers out of the U.S. market. The agreement--which U.S. steelmakers denounced as inadequate--calls for Brazil's two largest steel producers to suspend shipments of hot-rolled steel until October, then cut annual exports by 28% for five years. It will also establish minimum prices for the imports. The U.S.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1999 | CHRIS KRAUL and EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Signaling that the domestic steel industry deserves some breathing space from an unprecedented flood of imports, the U.S. Commerce Department on Friday issued a preliminary ruling that Brazil and Japan have dumped hot-rolled steel here and unfairly subsidized prices by up to 70%. The findings could lead to anti-dumping tariffs and penalties as early as mid-June if the Commerce ruling is finalized in late April, as expected, and if the U.S.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1999 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Minnesota farmer Doug Magnus is bracing for trouble when the first shipload of cheap Brazilian soybeans arrives in the United States this spring. Last week's currency collapse has made it cheaper to buy soybeans from Brazil than from him. That's bad news for U.S. farmers, the world's leading soybean producers, who were already sitting on a record crop and rock-bottom prices before their chief competitors saw a 32% plunge in their currency, the real, in the last week.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1998 | Times Wire Services
International lenders Friday officially completed a plan to roll over South Korean short-term debt through March 31, a source close to the talks told Reuters. "It gives us the time to sit down and work out an agreement with the Koreans longer term," the source said. U.S. Deputy Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers had said South Korea needs to strike a deal with international lenders "as rapidly as practicable" to roll over its short-term debt and strengthen investor confidence.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1996 | From Reuters
The United States on Tuesday targeted four nations for investigations on charges of unfair trade practices and hailed progress with Japan to deregulate its insurance industry. Brazil, Indonesia and Australia face investigations in connection with programs that affect auto makers. Argentina is alleged to have excessively high tariffs on imported textiles, apparel and footwear. At a news conference, acting U.S.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joao Batista de Souza doesn't know much about computers, but he knows he needs one. Since he started his video-rental business six months ago in the Sao Paulo suburb of Carapicuiba, his list of customers has grown to about 1,000. "There are a lot of customers and a lot of merchandise to keep track of, and it gets hard," said Souza, 32, as he waited to sign a purchase contract for an AT&T Station 500 personal computer.
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