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United States Trade Canada

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BUSINESS
March 20, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seventeen-year-old Luis Arostigue visited Mexico a few times and he has retained some stark images of the country. Etched deep are memories of raw sewage and dire poverty. A free-trade pact among the United States, Canada and Mexico could provide jobs for Mexicans and abate the misery of many poor workers, said the senior from Century High School in Santa Ana.
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BUSINESS
August 31, 2001 | From Reuters
The United States and Canada agreed to establish a working group to try to resolve a decades-old dispute between the two countries over softwood lumber trade, a U.S. official said Thursday. The decision to set up the group came out of daylong meetings in Washington on Thursday, said a spokesman for the U.S. trade representative. The spokesman said the two governments would meet again in September. He had no details on the composition of the group or how long its work might take.
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BUSINESS
August 13, 1992 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS and JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
American companies--ranging from international giants such as Procter & Gamble and Hewlett-Packard to a small Santa Monica waste disposal firm--have already begun determining how to capitalize on the proposed North American Free Trade Agreement. "Some companies are getting on the ball and trying to get in before the NAFTA rush begins," said Coleen Lassegard, assistant director of studies and programs at UC San Diego's Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies. "It's a whole new ballgame there."
BUSINESS
August 22, 2001 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canada's top trade official turned up the heat Tuesday in a nasty lumber dispute with the United States, filing a complaint with the World Trade Organization and threatening to curtail U.S. access to his country's energy resources. In a fiery speech to Canadian manufacturers, International Trade Minister Pierre Pettigrew accused U.S. officials of manipulating the trade rules to suit "their own, narrow, privileged actions."
BUSINESS
October 8, 1991 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If a free-trade agreement between the United States and Mexico is ratified, it will bring a wealth of economic benefits to California and Mexico, including a tripling of trade between the two in the 1990s, according to a study released Monday by Bank of America. California will "gain considerably" from such an agreement primarily because Mexico will become more prosperous, the study predicted. "We are quite optimistic about the effects of a free-trade agreement," said Frederick L.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1992 | From Associated Press
The United States and Canada tentatively have ended a beer dispute that had caused diminished sales of U.S. brands in Canada and produced threats of U.S. duties on imported Canadian beer. Under the agreement reached Saturday, the Canadian government--which sets minimum beer prices--would halt practices by June 30 that drive up the price of U.S. beer, said Malcolm McKechnie, spokesman for the Canadian Embassy. Canada will also eliminate other marketing barriers, he said.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2001 | From Reuters
The United States and Canada agreed to establish a working group to try to resolve a decades-old dispute between the two countries over softwood lumber trade, a U.S. official said Thursday. The decision to set up the group came out of daylong meetings in Washington on Thursday, said a spokesman for the U.S. trade representative. The spokesman said the two governments would meet again in September. He had no details on the composition of the group or how long its work might take.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2001 | RICHARD COWAN, REUTERS
The Commerce Department said Friday that it will slap a 19% import duty on billions of dollars worth of softwood lumber from Canada, a decision that prompted a protest from the Canadian government. The wood is used extensively in the construction of houses and home remodeling. American home builders, who want a free flow of cheap lumber, immediately protested the move, saying the duty will mean higher prices on new homes. But U.S.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Canada imposed a $1.58-per-bushel duty on imports of U.S. grain corn destined for provinces west of Ontario, the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency said. The agency said a preliminary investigation showed that U.S. grain corn, used primarily for livestock feed, was sold in Canada at prices that were an average $1.01 per bushel "below profitable levels." The agency said the corn was subsidized by an average of 57 cents per bushel. The U.S.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1997 | (Dow Jones)
A Canadian government agency has ruled that concrete panels manufactured by Custom Building Products Co. have been dumped on the Canadian market. The agency, Revenue Canada, said the Custom Building panels, which are reinforced with fiberglass mesh and used as a backing board for ceramic tile installation, were sold in Canada at an average of 35% below "fairly traded prices." The investigation was prompted by a complaint from Bed-Roc Industries Co. of Surrey, B.C.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2001 | RICHARD COWAN, REUTERS
The Commerce Department said Friday that it will slap a 19% import duty on billions of dollars worth of softwood lumber from Canada, a decision that prompted a protest from the Canadian government. The wood is used extensively in the construction of houses and home remodeling. American home builders, who want a free flow of cheap lumber, immediately protested the move, saying the duty will mean higher prices on new homes. But U.S.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Bush met Thursday with his Mexican counterpart, Vicente Fox, to discuss temporary visas for Mexican workers and plans for long-range energy development among Mexico, the U.S. and Canada. The meeting was the third for the pair, who talked at the Summit of the Americas in Canada last month and met in Mexico in February. Fox said they discussed long-range plans for the U.S. to import energy from Mexico and Canada, which have large reserves of oil and natural gas.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Canada imposed a $1.58-per-bushel duty on imports of U.S. grain corn destined for provinces west of Ontario, the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency said. The agency said a preliminary investigation showed that U.S. grain corn, used primarily for livestock feed, was sold in Canada at prices that were an average $1.01 per bushel "below profitable levels." The agency said the corn was subsidized by an average of 57 cents per bushel. The U.S.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1999 | JAMES FLANIGAN
For international economic relationships and hemispheric free-trade agreements, Canada has become a pioneer and a model for other nations adapting to the modern, global economy. More than a decade ago, Canada made a courageous decision to seek a free-trade agreement with the United States. The neighboring nations already had the largest trade relationship in the world because Canada bought more U.S. goods and services--$74 billion a year at that time--than Japan or any other country. And the U.
NEWS
February 28, 1999 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The global push toward a "borderless economy," already blamed for the turmoil that has impoverished millions from Seoul to Sao Paulo, is increasingly accused of another sin: undermining the sovereignty of governments. Sweeping free-trade initiatives of the 1990s, such as NAFTA and the World Trade Organization, are coming under attack for handing foreign interests the legal firepower to undercut public policy on economic, health, safety and other issues.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1998 | From Reuters
The Clinton administration said Friday that it is concerned about Canada's farm trade policies, which have caused a fresh border dispute to erupt with northern U.S. states over livestock and grain shipments. "It is time for Canada to take decisive action to level the playing field," said U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky. The U.S. is "highly concerned about Canada's agricultural trade policies," she said.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S., Canada Wrap Up Lumber Accord: U.S. and Canadian negotiators ended a long-running and bitter trade dispute on Tuesday by concluding an agreement slowing Canadian shipments of softwood lumber to the United States. The five-year pact, which was effective Monday, differs significantly from an agreement in principle by the two sides in February.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Canada Allows U.S. Wheat Through St. Lawrence Seaway: Canada had blocked shipments of durum last week, citing concerns about a wheat fungus in the southwestern United States. The ban had closed a major route for U.S. durum exports. Canada will allow U.S. durum to move through the seaway as long as none of the grain is unloaded in Canadian ports, a spokeswoman for the Canadian Embassy said. Other types of wheat will be allowed into Canada after inspection for the fungus, Karnal bunt.
NEWS
September 2, 1998 | MARK FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This town is tired of teetering on the edge of America. Tourists don't visit, logging is down, boat-building is dead, fishing is bad. Even smuggling is harder. With its boarded-up buildings in the heart of downtown, with its double-digit jobless rate that is the worst in the state, Calais sits in the midst of what Mainers call the Appalachia of the Atlantic. Even the local tourism slogan reflects a hangdog mentality: "Washington County--Just off the beaten path."
NEWS
July 19, 1997 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's foreign trade deficit widened in May as Americans, continuing their spending spree during good economic times at home, stepped up their import buying, the government reported Friday. Commerce Department figures showed that, partly because of increased purchases of imported oil and automobiles, the trade deficit soared to $10.2 billion in May--the largest such imbalance in four months. The U.S.
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